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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway in Days Gone By

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Flooding is not a new phenomenon. Our photo shows Dock Road in Galway under water in February 1977.

1915

New sports ground

At the meeting of Galway Urban Council, a letter was read from Mr. Thornton, Secretary of the Galway West Board of the G.A.A., urging on the Council the desirability of establishing a property sports ground at South Park.

Mr. J. Griffin said he understood in Dublin at the last match, there was a thousand pounds taken. If they could see their way to make the field right, it would be a great advantage.

Docks war bonus

On Friday night last, a deputation of the National union of Dock Labourers, Galway branch, met the employers to discuss the crux which had arisen at the docks. After the pros and cons of the question had been debated, it was decided to give the permanent men 2s. a week of a war bonus, the casuals to work at the old rate. This the men agreed to.

A few days subsequently, another crux arose which has not yet been settled. In the official intimation of the terms to the men, it was stated that the war bonus would be discontinued if there was any breach of agreement. The men, rightly or wrongly, thought they saw in this a loophole left open to the employers to seize the first opportunity to withdraw the bonus.

1940

Mental hospital cost

Dr. Joseph Kearney, the Commissioner administering the affair of the Ballinasloe Mental Hospital, adopted an estimate for 1941-42 at the meeting of the hospital for £133,738, or an increased demand over last year of over £23,000.

It was a startling increase and demand to make on the ratepayers of County Galway and Roscommon, he said, but it was due to the increased costs and Castlerea, and increased costs of all necessities in all department in the institution.

Appeal for volunteers

A strong appeal to the young men in Headford and district to join the L.S.F. was made by representatives of different political parties speaking after an L.S.F. parade through the town.

District Leader Margetts said the L.S.F. was formed for the defence of the country. It was not formed from any material point of view, or for any political purpose, but simply for the defence of the country should the necessity arise during the present world crisis.

He had seen the horrors of war in other countries and how terrible they were for men, women and children and this Local Security Force has been formed here to ensure that similar horrors would not be brought to our own island.

They had the best manhood in the country in the L.S.F., but there were many more equally good who had not yet joined up. Headford had distinguished itself in the past in the fight for freedom and to protect their women and children, their homes and their property.

He appealed to all able-bodied young men in the parish to join the L.S.F. and thus assist in safeguarding all they held dear for the glory and honour of Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Angela O'Keefe, Chairwoman of Music for Galway, pictured with a £16,000 Steinway grand piano just after it was delivered to University College Galway, ahead of its assembly in the Aula Maxima. Music for Galway fundraised to buy the piano which had to be transported from London after its purchase.

1922

Tackling drink

The International Congress on Prohibition sitting in Brussels reports that the liquor problem is substantially the same everywhere. In Ireland at present alcoholism has for us a tragic interest.

At no period in Irish history has there been so great a consumption of alcoholic liquors. Prohibition, even if it were practicable, would not solve the problem. America has taught us that lesson.

Scarcely a week passes that the American hospital registers do not record the death from alcoholic poisoning on a scale unprecedented before the country went “dry”.

The drink problem will never be successfully tackled in Ireland until such time as the public cooperate with the authorities in a rigid enforcement of the licensing laws and the drunkard is regarded as a pariah in a respectable community.

In this connection the announcement made at the last Galway parish court that persons found guilty of illicit distillation will be sent to jail without the option of a fine will be welcomed.

This is a step in the right direction and should act as a deterrent to people at present engaged in a traffic which is slowly poisoning the lives, in the moral as well as the physical sense, of large numbers of our people in outlying portions of the country.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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