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€3m for Galway City Ring Road in 2024 roads funding budget

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

€3m for Galway City Ring Road in 2024 roads funding budget €3m for Galway City Ring Road in 2024 roads funding budget

The Galway City Ring Road – currently held up because of a judicial review – has been allocated €3 million in the Government’s National Roads funding budget for 2024, it was confirmed this week.

Minister of State and Government Chief Whip, Deputy Hildegarde Naughton said that the €3 million allocation for the Galway Ring Road – made to Galway County Council – would be used ‘to progress the scheme through planning’.

The project – with an estimated cost of between €500m and €1 billion (Dept of Public Exependiture) – has been dogged by delays for the past 24-years since it formed part of the Galway Transportation and Planning Study back in 1999.

In January, 2023, the High Court quashed the approval decision for the project made by An Bord Pleanála in December, 2021 – following that court decision, Galway City Council, the County Council and Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) reaffirmed their commitment to the ring road.

Last September, the ‘Prospects 23/24’ report published by the Dept of Public Expenditure, ‘envisaged’ construction work on the ring road to start in 2026 with a completion date in 2029, stating that the project ‘is an integral part of the county’s infrastructure strategy’.

A figure of €1.3 million has been allocated this year by TII to two city roads projects – the N83 Tuam Road Payment Scheme (€900,000) and €400,000 for improvement works on N6 Bóthar na dTreabh route.
This is a shortened preview version of this story. To read the rest of the article, see the February 23 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can support our journalism and buy a digital edition HERE.

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Mixed bag from Connacht enough to take the spoils

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Mixed bag from Connacht enough to take the spoils Mixed bag from Connacht enough to take the spoils

Cardiff 12

Connacht 16

By JOHN FALLON

CONNACHT coach Pete Wilkins has been around rugby long enough to know the ledger usually gets balanced throughout a long season so having been caught at the death when playing well against the likes of Edinburgh and Leinster earlier in the campaign, it was refreshing for his side to carve out a win when playing poorly at the Arms Park on Saturday.

Cardiff played with 14 men for most of the game and were down to 13 either side of the break, but Connacht laboured to put them away in heavy rain and a 12,000 strong home crowd, before the impact of their stronger bench secured a second URC win in a row and leaves them poised to repeat last season’s late run to the knockout stages.

Four of their next five fixtures are against teams currently below them in the league, but Wilkins knows they have plenty of homework to do from their first win in Cardiff in seven years if they are to push for a knockout place again.

“I think it will take a lot of analysis and the reason for that is that almost every element of our game from our kicking game to our set-piece, to our attack and to our defence, had some really positive moments, particularly in the second half,” said Wilkins.

“There was some quality especially considering the conditions we were playing in and the pressure Cardiff were putting us under.

“But there were also some very poor moments where we needed to be better and where we didn’t deliver in those game areas. One of the first things we talked about in the dressing room was the intensity of our defence, five metres out, ten metres out from our own line, compared to what we were like in the first half compared to how we came out at the start of the second half.

Pictured: Connacht’s Peter Dooley who scored their only try in Saturday’s hard-earned victory over Cardiff at the Arms Park. Inset: out half JJ Hanrahan who landed three penalties.

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Galway City sports clubs join forces for ‘Period Positive’ initiative

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Galway City sports clubs join forces for ‘Period Positive’ initiative Galway City sports clubs join forces for ‘Period Positive’ initiative

A unique partnership between five Galway sports clubs aims to remove one of the reasons that girls are dropping out of sport in such large numbers once they transfer to secondary school.

One in five girls quit sport when they leave primary school – four times more than the boys, a difference that was exacerbated during the Covid years when fun competitions or blitzes appealing to the less competitive had to be sidelined.

Embarrassment over leaking during a period and not having sanitary pads or tampons is cited as one factors in those drop-out rates around the age of puberty. The fact that there are no facilities to dispose of period products also leads to them being flushed down the toilet causing a major headache for sports clubs maintaining clubhouses due to blockages.

Five clubs in the city will now offer girls free period products from each coach and all clubhouse toilets will have wall dispensers providing eco-friendly Fab Little Bags, disposal bags to ensure easy, discreet, and responsible disposal of used products. Girls will know that the sanitary products are contained in a bag beside the first aid kit, and they are free to go and take one as necessary, explains Martina Dolan, who is leading the initiative on behalf of the Liam Mellows Camogie Club.

“It’s something really simple but it’s an acknowledgment to kids that we’re aware of what they’re going through once a month and that it is as natural and reaching for something in the first aid kit, so there’s no stigma, it’s a pledge from us to them that they aren’t going to get caught short,” explains the underage coach.

“Sometimes it’s good for a coach to know when a girl has a period because it does affect their training, their energy, it might explain a lack of enthusiasm, so we can keep it on our radar.”

They hope to secure sponsorship from local businesses to pay for each kit bag, which cost €28, as well as the refills and have one available for every team head coach. The project is all about keeping girls in sport for that crucial age between 12 and 15.

(Photo by Don Soules: members of the Liam Mellows Camogie Club, who won the Connacht title last year).
This is a shortened preview version of this story. To read the rest of the article, see the February 23 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can support our journalism and buy a digital edition HERE.

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Supporting Entertainment

Acting Out visiting with Quare Tales and workshop to support AMACH!

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Acting Out visiting with Quare Tales and workshop to support AMACH! Acting Out visiting with Quare Tales and workshop to support AMACH!

Acting Out, Dublin’s award-winning, LGBTQ+ theatre group is coming to Galway this Saturday night, February 24.

The group will be at the city’s Nuns’ Island Theatre at 7.30pm with its new show, Quare Tales, which will also be a fundraiser for local community group AMACH! LGBT Galway.

AMACH! is celebrating the opening of the new Teach Solais LGBT+ Resource Centre at the city’s Courthouse Square.

Following a callout for new ten-minute plays last October and having received over 100 entries, Acting Out chose eight plays with LGBTQ+ themes for Quare Tales.

“We were surprised by the number of entries, which came from all over the world,” says Producer Sean Denyer. And the group deliberately chose shorter works.

“We wanted to encourage new writers – a full-length play can be a difficult prospect when you are starting off, so one that lasts only 10 minutes is a good place to start.”

The plays span comedy, drama, sci-fi and horror.

“There’s something for everyone,” says Artistic Director, Howard Lodge, “Some of the pieces are very funny and others are thoughtful and dark. If you don’t enjoy one, you are probably going to enjoy the next.

The evening will also host the premiere of Sean Denyer’s own short drama, Ghost Bitch, which won the Scripts Festival Prize for Best Short Play.

Funding from Department of Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth LGBT+ Visibility Fund has allowed the group to bring the show to Galway, as well as performing it in Dublin, Sean explains.

“We have had a great experience in the past, taking shows to places such as Birr and Cork and Manorhamilton, places that do not often get to see theatre with queer lives at its centre. It’s been great to partner with AMACH LGBT Galway on this, and to hopefully raise some much-needed cash for their brilliant work.”

Artistic Director Howard will be facilitating a drama workshop at Teach Solais LGBT+ Resource Centre this Saturday from 11am-1pm.

It’s the first of many events planned for the new community space.

Olly McDermott-Foley, from the board of AMACH! LGBT is delighted to welcome Acting Out to Galway.

“It’s great to have LGBTQ+ events like this for the community in the West of Ireland. We are so thankful to Acting Out for supporting us in a fundraising capacity and are delighted to host the workshop in our new centre on Courthouse Square.”

A jury will award the winning new play with a €100 prize and there will also be a prize voted on by the audience.

Tickets for the show Quare Tales, at Nuns’ Island Theatre at 7.30pm this Saturday are available at https://www.galwayartscentre.ie and cost €12/5.

Booking for the performance workshop taking place at Teach Solais on Saturday from 11am-1pm is at Eventbrite.ie, and is €5 or by donation.

 

 

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Supporting Entertainment

Live music adds to one-woman show that explores loneliness and sanity

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Live music adds to one-woman show that explores loneliness and sanity Live music adds to one-woman show that explores loneliness and sanity

The Hare, a play by Clare Monnelly and Bob Kelly, featuring actor Úna Ní Bhriain and musician Steve Wickham of the Waterboys, will visit Galway from next Thursday, February 29, to Saturday, March 2, as part of a nationwide 10-venue tour.

The one-woman play, with live music composed and performed live by Steve Wickham, is being presented by Once Off Productions.

It’s about a young woman in rural Ireland and how she deals with being isolated by her friends, while also exploring how best to navigate staying sane – examining if she’ll yield to her innate wildness or deal head-on with a supposedly civilised world that rejects her.

This unnamed, troubled person (Ní Bhriain) has never known her father – although his presence looms large in her life – and her mother is confined to bed.

Lonely and living at the edge of the world, the young woman is ridiculed by her peers and is unable to fit in. So, she creates her own world and lives as best she can. She sees other people, but keeps them at a distance. The Hare is set on a day where a letter arrives, offering her the possibility of a life away from this place and these people.

The play, directed by Bob Kelly, premiered at last year’s Cairde Arts Festival in Sligo, going on to play Cork Arts Theatre and the Pavilion Theatre, Dún Laoghaire.

Clare Monnelly’s first play, Charlie’s a Clepto, was nominated for two Irish Times Theatre Awards and the Stewart Parker New Playwright Bursary. Her second, minefield, premiered at the 2019 Dublin Fringe Festival and received three Fringe nominations. Also an actor, Clare has worked with Druid, the Gate, the Abbey and Decadent and has been nominated for an Irish Times Best Actress award.

Director Bob Kelly is also an actor and playwright who has written for Landmark Productions (a musical adaptation of Pat McCabe’s Breakfast on Pluto, which got a rehearsed reading in Galway at the 2019 Arts Festival) and for Sligo’s Blue Raincoat (Tintown). His most recent writing project is a new staging of Pat McCabe’s  The Butcher Boy.

The Hare will be at Druid’s Mick Lally Theatre from February 29 t 2 at 8pm nightly.

Tickets are €20, from 091 568660, at the box office, or online at themicklallytheatre.ticketsolve.com.

Pictured: Úna Ní Bhriain and Steve Wickham in The Hare.

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Galway League back in FAI Youth Inter-League decider

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Galway League back in FAI Youth Inter-League decider Galway League back in FAI Youth Inter-League decider

Soccer Wrap with Mike Rafferty

The Galway League are back in the FAI Youth Inter-League final for a third successive year, and they will take on DDSL in the decider in Athlone Town Stadium tomorrow (2pm).

The management team of Ollie Neary, Damien Brennan, and Tom Lally have seen their side overcome some stiff opposition on the way to the final and while they displayed a tendency to concede goals in previous games, they showed a greater ability to score them.

They defeated the Mayo League by 10-6 on aggregate over two legs, winning the home game 7-3 in Eamonn Deacy Park with Evan Moran, Colm Whelan and Scott Dillon all scoring twice, as Harry Mitchell added the last.

With all the hard work done they shared the spoils in the second leg in Castlebar as Scott Dillon notched a hat trick in a 3-3 draw.

Matters were equally competitive in the semi-final where they required extra time to see off Inishowen 4-3 in a game played in Sligo. On this occasion, Moran and Daragh Cleary both struck twice for the Galway League.

In the decider they will face a DDSL side who defeated Waterford by 3-0 in their semi-final and are managed by Vinny Perth and Barry Ferguson.

Squad: Alan Zimmerman, Senan Treacy, Eddie Silke, Ryan McPhilips, Jack Dunleavy, James Murphy (all Colga); Luc McHugh, Jack Carroll, Scott Dillon, and Liam Murphy (Knocknacarra); Dara McGrath, Daniel Quinn, Jack Ryan, and Evan Moran (Mervue United); Conor Daly, Colm Whelan, Daragh Cleary, and Adam Lavelle (all Maree-Oranmore); Ben McDonnell and Jack Nolan (Salthill Devon); Luke Wyre (Hibernians); Harry Mitchell (Colemanstown United); and Hugh McDonald (Athenry).

Pictured: Knocknacarra FC goalkeeper Adam Wiytch comes to punch clear as David Tarpey of Mervue United B jumps to meet a cross in the Division One clash between the sides at Fahy’s Fiield last weekend. Photos: Joe O’Shaughnessy.

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Journalist Justine to share insights at book festival

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Journalist Justine to share insights at book festival Journalist Justine to share insights at book festival

One of Ireland’s top journalists, Justine McCarthy, will take part in a symposium as part of the Ennis Book Club Festival on Sunday, March 3, alongside lecturer, commentator and housing expert, Dr Rory Hearne.

The topic, Breaking the cycle of poverty: A Crisis of Imagination, might seem like a depressing subject for the last morning of the three-day festival but it is a fact that discussions among book club members often wander to current affairs and everyday worries – and the Ennis festival has its origins in a local book club.

Justine McCarthy, currently a weekly columnist with The Irish Times, has had her eye on these matters since she left college 40 years ago to start her journalistic career at the Irish Independent.

In the four decades since, her work has been recognised, not just within the trade but by organisations working to make Ireland a better place and by readers.

A selection of Justine’s finest writings features in her latest book, An Eye on Ireland: New and Selected Journalism, which is a journey through social change in Ireland.

As it happens, Justine and I were not only in college together learning our journalistic skills but we shared a house in Kimmage. We were the ‘country girls’ on our two-year course in the Rathmines College of Commerce and our house soon became a hub for other students in our year. With only 20 altogether in our class and most of them still living at home with their families, our house was a popular place.

Our other housemates were Anne Flaherty, whose father Frank was a Claddagh man running a business in Ennis, Marese McDonagh from Sligo, and Mary Wilson from Tipperary.

All of us remain friends to this day and we attended Justine’s book launch in Dublin where one of her former editors, Vincent Browne, did the honours.

Justine is one of the sweetest, most compassionate people I have ever known, who wears her heart on her sleeve and writes her truth as she sees it. That integrity and her formidable intelligence have made her one of Ireland’s most sincere and insightful columnists.

The foreword to her new collection is written by fellow journalist and political columnist Miriam Lord and is followed by  candid introduction by Justine herself. In this new piece of writing, she describes her childhood in Bandon, West Cork, her time in college and her subsequent journeys to the four corners of Ireland covering the country’s biggest and darkest news stories.

Pictured: Justine McCarthy:  Her new book features a column she wrote for The Sunday Tribune about the trial of Galwayman Gerald Barry for the murder of Swiss student Manuela Riedo.  PHOTO: WILLIE DILLON.

 

 

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No word from Galway hurling mentors over state of play for long trek to Antrim

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

No word from Galway hurling mentors over state of play for long trek to Antrim No word from Galway hurling mentors over state of play for long trek to Antrim

NOT a dicky bird from the Galway hurling camp this week despite repeated attempts to contact members of the team management ahead of Sunday’s long trek to Belfast.

It leaves us in the dark about who is available for the clash with Antrim at Corrigan Park (1pm) where Galway will be expected to bounce back from their defeat to Tipperary in Thurles last Sunday week.

For the record, no effort was made to liaise with Henry Shefflin given the courtesy he continually shows to the media pack after matches, but surely there is an obligation on other mentors to keep the Galway hurling public informed to a certain degree of what is going on.

What we do know is that Cathal Mannion, Brian Concannon, Declan McLoughlin and Kevin Cooney, who is out for the entirety of Galway’s league and championship campaigns with a bad hamstring injury which required surgery, remain on the casualty list.

With the Fitzgibbon Cup concluded – and more disappointment for University of Galway – it means that management’s hands at least won’t be tied in terms of ruling out players due to fatigue.

Galway were something of a disappointment against Tipp. True, there was no shortage of effort in twice rallying from significant deficits, but the centre of their defence was exposed, while a few of the team’s light-framed players suffered in the physical stakes.

Goalkeeper Darach Fahy, his brother Cianan, Tom Monaghan (first-half), Conor Cooney, who landed five points from play, and Conor Whelan were most prominent for the Tribesmen although Seán Linnane added some badly needed fire after being introduced.

You’d imagine that Gearóid McInerney and Daithí Burke will be restored to the heart of the Galway backline, while Sunday might also be an ideal opportunity to include the fit-again David Burke in midfield. Furthermore, is his St Thomas’ clubmate Cian Mahony worth a look at in defence?

The reality is that Galway are continuing to operate with largely the same personnel since this management took over in the winter of 2021. Few new players have broken into the first fifteen despite many getting the opportunity to impress. There are heaps of decent hurlers in the county, but most are at the same level.

Pictured: Galway’s Gearóid McInerney tussling for possession with Antrim’s Conor Johnston during last year’s Leinster Championship clash at Pearse Stadium.

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Galway United seeking first victory over Dundalk at Oriel Park in two decades

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Galway United seeking first victory over Dundalk at Oriel Park in two decades Galway United seeking first victory over Dundalk at Oriel Park in two decades

GALWAY Unted will look to end a 20-year wait for a win at Oriel Park when they head to the decrepit Louth venue this Friday (7.45pm) to take on a side who will still be smarting from their FAI Cup humiliation at the hands of the Tribesmen last season.

For a club with a string of rotten records, United’s record in Oriel Park is the most rotten of all: just three wins in 40 visits, the most recent being back in April 2004 when goals from Colin Fortune, Dave Goldbey, and John Russell sealed a 3-1 win.

There was also a 3-0 win ‘away’ to Dundalk the following season, but that victory came in Gortakeegan, the home ground of then league side, Monaghan United, as the grass pitch at Oriel Park was being replaced with an astro-turf surface at the time.

The entire venue needs replacing at this stage: the ramshackle nature of the venue was summed-up in preseason when new owner, Brian Ainscough, visited the ground for the first time and his appointed seat in the stand snapped as he went to sit down.

It was a metaphor that looked like being applicable to the team as well: the most recent side to win the Premier Division title (2019) other than Shamrock Rovers, Dundalk finished fifth and outside the European places last season, and were hockeyed 4-0 by United in their FAI Cup quarter-final clash in Eamonn Deacy Park in September.

It looked to be another nail in the coffin of the managerial career of Galway City native, Stephen O’Donnell; and when the club’s all-time leading scorers, another Galwegian – Loughrea’s own Pat Hoban – left to join Derry City in the off-season, O’Donnell looked to be on borrowed time.

But just like when Mark Twain confirmed to a writer from the New York Journal that reports of his death were an exaggeration, O’Donnell’s apparent demise as Dundalk manager has also apparently been prematurely declared, with the former Galway United captain still very much in charge of a side that opened their campaign with a 1-1 draw away to a Shamrock Rovers outfit chasing a fifth title on the spin.

“Dundalk got a great result [on Friday], we know it is going to be difficult up in Oriel Park, but it is great to be in it, it is great to be talking about Dundalk in Oriel Park and Pats in Terryland than where we were for the last six years,” said Galway United assistant manager, Ollie Horgan.

Pictured: Galway United’s Regan Donelon launching an attack against Carl Axel Sjoberg of St Patrick’s Athletic during Friday’s Premier Division tie at Eamonn Deasy Park. Photo: Joe O’Shaughnessy.

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