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Galway Bay FM News Archives

With the start of summer, there came ‘the call of the wild’

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Date Published: 09-Jun-2011

How is it that I keep on running into people in shops who tell me there is a long-range forceast that June and July will break all records for sunshine and temperatures . . . but I can’t quite track down the origin of the reports.

While I have nothing but respect for some postman who apparently predicted those past two Winters with frost that killed hedges and trees all over the place, I tend to go with ‘science’ and the forecasts which can point to something other than the way the birds are behaving.

We had a touch of Summer at the weekend, but there was a time when the end of May and beginning of June were sure to mean that, suddenly, I felt the call of the wild . . . we might be heading into the Summer holidays, but I couldn’t wait for all that.

Maybe it’s a bit fanciful to believe that, like the dog in Jack London’s marvellous book The Call Of The Wild, I had some kind of ancient yen to be out in the countryside and it would not be denied . . . especially when it came to Summer, good weather, and endless hours of dreaming.

If there were Irish mitching championships, there is little doubt that I could have represented my country. For, when I was just 10 years old, I was the most incorrigible truant . . . and I think the only one ever to have the cops out searching for him!

I was in Fourth Class in primary school at the time. I simply hated school, I was terrified of the wallopings with the leather which were liberally dished-out, maybe I was a bit lazy, and ‘doing my own thing’ wandering abroad had become my way of life.

Endless days stretched before me of chasing that single indifferent brown trout that seemed to inhabit the river at the bottom of Tuam Racecourse. Or with a jampot, I went fishing for ‘pinkeens’ or ‘jarogs’, which I brought home in jamjars.

Then there were the endless hours sitting on the riverbank reading, or marvelling at the tracery of the sheeptracks which criss-crossed the fields.

Had I been of a poetic leaning, perhaps I might have been a bit of a Wordsworth, but, for me, the joy of the days spent wandering was the pleasure of doing just that – wandering. I kept my ear cocked for the ‘town clock’ so that I would have some idea of when to appear back at home again, but, for the rest, I was a free spirit.

 

Like all ‘school days’, I do not remember a single wet day! In the morning I packed my schoolbag with The Readers Digest, which was my staple diet when it arrived in the post once a month, or I nicked a copy of Great Expectations or Oliver Twist from the sittingroom ‘collection’.

I don’t remember that I particularly cared for Dickens – there were too many descriptive passages for my liking – but I read the books like adventure novels to be enjoyed, and lightly skipped over the lengthier descriptive passages to get back into the storyline once more.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway Bay FM News Archives

Galway ‘Park and Ride’ could become permanent

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Date Published: 07-May-2013

A park ‘n’ ride scheme from Carnmore into Galway city could become a permanent service if there is public demand.

That’s according to the Chief Executive of Galway Chamber of Commerce, Michael Coyle.

The pilot scheme will begin at 7.20 next Monday morning, May 13th.

Motorists will be able to park cars at the airport carpark in Carnmore and avail of a bus transfer to Forster Street in the city.

Buses will depart every 20 minutes at peak times and every 30 minutes at offpeak times throughout the day, at a cost of 2 euro per journey.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Tuam awaits UK hay import as overnight rainfall adds to fodder crisis

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Date Published: 09-May-2013

Tuam is now awaiting a third import of hay from the UK as overnight rainfall has increased pressure on farmers struggling to source fodder.

A total of ten loads are expected at Connacht Gold stores throughout the West with a load expected at the Airglooney outlet this evening or tomorrow.

Farmers throughout the county have been struggling to cope with the animal feed shortage and a below than normal grass growth due to unseasonal weather conditions.

Overnight rainfall in the Galway area has also added to the problem making ground conditions in many areas are quite poor.

Joe Waldron, Agricultual Advisor with Connacht Gold says farmers in short supply can contact the Airglooney outlet on 093 – 24101.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Transport Minister urges end to Bus Eireann strike action

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Date Published: 12-May-2013

The Transport Minister is urging drivers at Bus Éireann to engage in talks with management, in an effort to bring their strike action to an end.

There were no Bus Éireann services operating out of Galway today as a result of nationwide strike action by staff affiliated with the national bus and rail union.

Up to 20 Bus Éireann drivers are continuing to picket outside the bus depot at the docks in the city this evening.

Drivers from other unions have decided not to cross the picket line and go into work today – causing the disruption to be even worse.

Bus drivers are protesting against five million euro worth of cuts to their overtime and premium pay – cuts which Bus Eireann says are vital to ensure the future viability of the company.

The majority of services nationwide are disrupted, and the union say strike action will continue until management are willing to go back into negotiations.

However, it’s not expected to affect school services next week.

Galway bay fm news understands that around 70 percent, or over 100 Galway bus Eireann drivers are affiliated with the NBRU.

 

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