Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

A Different View

Who turned St. Patrick’s Day into sodom and begorrah?

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Judge Geoffrey Browne pictured with members of An Garda Siochana from the Tuam District on his final appearance at the local court. Also pictured are court staff Patti Mulkerrin, Geraldine Courtney and Breda Byron along with Inspector Damien Flanagan, Superintendent Pat McHugh, Superintendent Marie Skehill.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

A little green used to suffice – a small sprig of shamrock pinned to your collar – before we decided that size was everything and St Patrick’s Day wasn’t the national holiday unless we were well and truly totally green from head to toe, inside and out.

Now the accoutrements for your Paddy’s Day parade are more of the comic book variety, the sort of clothes you wouldn’t clean the car with outside of March 17.

Like leprechaun hats – big floppy towers of green with turfs of iridescent orange from the sides to show you’re Irish in a ‘John Hinde postcard meets Disneyland’ kind of way. Also worn by Irish soccer fans standing in front of you at matches, singing Ole Ole which ensuring that you’d have a better view behind a steel stand pillar.

Or leprechaun beards – long shaggy lengths of carrot orange hanging from your face like you’ve accidently taken a large chunk out of a dodgy carpet and you’re now desperately trying to swallow it.

‘Kiss Mr I’m Irish’ tee-shirts – a tacky green tee-shirt designed to make you incredibly attractive to the opposite sex when, without it, the tide wouldn’t take you out.

Or green beer – you wouldn’t touch it at any other time of the year and even on March 17 it looks like something that something which someone else had already imbibed and decided it didn’t sit well with the digestive system.

And then tee-shirts that proclaim you’re a champion drinker of beer – because women just fall for that attribute in a prospective partner every single time.

Yes, when once we wore a little twist of shamrock and perhaps even a little green badge, now we’re greener than Eamon Ryan and John Gormley put together.

We certainly know how to mark the feast day of our patron saint – by drowning ourselves in a vat of green beer in his honour.

This year Mr Tayto is getting a green white and gold suit to replace his red one as part of a St Patrick’s Day promotion, while the Dublin parade is sponsored by Fyffes – a move entirely in keeping with the notion of a Banana Republic.

No doubt our newly empowered Taoiseach Enda Kenny will be dropping off at the White House with the traditional bowl of shamrock for President Obama – something Barak must have first mistaken for a crystal container of clover or weeds.

That said, his fellow Americans know how to embrace the spirit of the Oirish, by turning the Hudson green and parading all things Irish – except gay people obviously – up and down Seventh Avenue.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

It’s alright to admit life and work can bore you to tears

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

In all fairness, who hasn’t, on occasion, found their life or their work utterly, mind-numbingly boring? Who wouldn’t have willingly stuck needles in their eyes just to inject a bit of a buzz into the monotony?

Good for you if the answer is ‘not me’ – but for those who admit that they’re sometimes bored out of their trees, meet your new role model; Frenchman Frédéric Desnard, who sued his employers….for being bored.

Not just that – he sued them, and walked away with €50,000 in compensation.

Frédéric worked as a manager at a perfume manufacturer at the Paris-based perfume company Interparfum, but he told the court he had been asked to do between 20 and 40 minutes’ work a day in return for his €80,000 annual salary.

For the other 99.9 per cent of the population, that’s a dream job right there, once you could cope with the smell – but Frédéric knew there was more to life than seven solitary hours a day spent twiddling his thumbs.

The 48-year-old used the word ‘placardiser’ to describe what had happened to him; in literal English that means ‘to be put in a cupboard’ – or ‘to be put aside’.

And where others might have claimed they were suffering from burn-out, Frédéric had been destroyed by extreme ‘bore-out’.

To be fair, Frédéric was a man of rare principle; he told the court he was employed as a manager, but was soon relegated to four years of menial tasks which left him ‘depressed and ashamed’.

He gave the court some examples of the type of ‘boring’ jobs he was given, like configuring the CEO’s tablet and escorting tradesmen at his boss’s home.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Using proper punctuation is not aggressive – full stop

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

In fairness, text messaging was never designed for us oldies; we’re of a time when poor handwriting got you a whack across the knuckles – and woe betide you if you left out the full stop.

It was the late, great Con Houlihan who famously said that a man who could misuse an apostrophe was capable of anything – and he didn’t mean it in a good way.

How he’d hold his head in his hands if he were still around for the world of texting; actually, that’s not a great analogy, because Con had a habit of covering his face with his hands all the time anyway.

But for Con – who never typed and whose handwriting was a spidery scrawl where each A4 page usually fitted no more than three sentences – punctuation was everything.

His halcyon days were in the Evening Press where, by common consensus, his work was so erudite and original that a swathe of readers bought the paper to just enjoy his column alone.

Later on, after the demise of the Press, he moved to the Sunday World and later the Irish Star, where he brought the same scholarly discipline to his every piece.

Con never darkened the door of the Star but instead his column – a raft of loose pages – would be dropped in by hand, then typeset and redelivered to him for proofing and approval.

And if a comma was lost or added, a semi-colon found where he insisted a colon should be, Con would spot it quicker than a cat would spot a mouse – and he’d pounce with even greater speed and purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Turf love provides the smell of the summer on candle front

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The big seller locally in the world of candles this year doesn’t have essence of lavender or vanilla or eucalyptus infused to its wick to engage your scent. No – this year the scent of choice is that aroma of pure Irish turf.

And for around €12 – or the price of a bag or two of the real stuff – you get a small candle in something the size of an old tobacco tin, which, when lit, radiates the smell of a turf fire.

All of which is wonderful and evocative and a memory of halcyon days at home – or alternatively the very smell that you’ve spent half your life trying to get out of your nostrils.

I’m sure it’s big in America – where actual turf is probably harder to find than gold – or in high-rise apartment blocks where you can marry the scent of the candle with a video of a real fire on your wall-mounted, flat-screen television to give you an artificial yet authentic taste of home.

There was a time when candles just smelled of candles, before they were nothing at all if they weren’t laced with the essence of this, that or the other.

There was a time when candles were almost exclusively for church use, because our forebears had discovered the joys of electric light. And given that rural electrification is still in living memory for some, using candles by night when you had lights burning bright might be seen as lacking a modern outlook.

Of course, everything turns full circle; just as the notion of having exposed floorboards – when you could have Lino – would have once been seen as an indication that you didn’t have the cash to fully furnish your house.

But now, sanded floorboards are back and so too are candles, only now they come with so many scents and smells that you’re either spoiled for choice or tied up in knots.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending