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A Different View

When it comes to talk it’s all in the way you tell ‘em

Dave O'Connell

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Mopping up the water from the windows of the announcer's cabin during the heavy rainfall before the start of the Intermediate Camogie final replay between Oranmore Maree and Eyrecourt at St Brendan's Park, Loughrea, on Sunday. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There’s a story often told from some time back of a night that Castleblaney’s man mountain Big Tom McBride and his band turned up for a dance at a venue in New York – only to find the room packed to the rafters with disorientated drug addicts.

The problem, of course, lay with the posters advertising this event as starring a band called Big Tom and the Mainliners – leading the addled addicts to believe that this was a giant needle fest in the heart of the Big Apple.

Four Roads to Glenamaddy is all good well but these guys were hoping for a higher destination with a much shorter, if more hazardous, journey to get there.

Country music was the backdrop to another name game around that same time, when the player they called the Black Flash, Laurie Cunningham, was setting the old English First Division alight.

Back in 1977, he left his first club Leyton Orient for the city lights of West Bromwich Albion, then managed by one half of Ireland’s latest dancing sensations, Johnny Giles.

This was long before Johnny sold his soul for thirty pieces of chocolate; back then he was gainfully deployed trying to put together the footballing equivalent of the Ford plant in Daghenham by surrounding himself with a collection of old Irish pros at the club.

Galway’s old manager Paddy Mulligan was among them as were Mick Martin and the man who still holds the record for Irish international away trips, Ray Treacy – most of the trips, it has to be said, were undertaken as a travel agent.

But Ray was never slow with a word in any company and when Gilesy introduced their new superstar left winger to the rest of the players, Ray told him he was a great admirer of his talent.

“I have all your albums at home,” he told the bemused Black Flash, before revealing that his favourite recording of all had to be the anthemic ballad, Lovely Leitrim.

Ray was talking of Larry Cunningham, of course, the man from North Longford whose gravelly tones will also always be associated with those Forty Shades of Green.

But for the rest of his WBA career, Laurie was known as Lovely Leitrim by a squad where only the Irish lads had a clue what the joke was.

It’s not known if he carried his nickname with him to Real Madrid or any of his other eight subsequent clubs before he was killed, at the tender age of 33, in a car crash in Spain outside his adopted home in Madrid.

The point of all this is simple – a name in one part of the world can have an entirely different connotation in another. And conversely a pun, a phrase or an acronym in one place may mean absolutely nothing – or something highly offensive – somewhere else.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Exam points are not the only measure of education success

Dave O'Connell

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

By now, the next batch of around 60,000 students set for third-level education are over a week into the Leaving Cert – the exam that will determine what course they attain a place in for the new academic year.

Their success – added to the performances of their class-mates – will determine their alma mater’s position in what are commonly known as the school league tables.

This is a calculation of how successful a secondary school is, based entirely on the number of its Leaving Certs it gets into third-level education.

In turn – based on this – parents will choose where to send their little bundles of joy when the time comes for them to make the transition from primary to second-level.

And it’s such an arbitrary method of determining the relative success or failure of a centre of education, because it leaves so much out of the equation.

Firstly, it means performance is entirely based on the numbers who go on to third-level, ignoring those who gain apprenticeships or go straight into the workplace.

Admittedly, that’s not a large cohort these days because Careers Guidance seems to begin and end with helping you to choose the right course, not the right career.

But more fundamentally, getting a good student to pass his or her exams and gain a place in college isn’t the ultimate test of a teacher; getting a student who is struggling with reading or writing to a level where they comfortably do both is a far better achievement for any teacher.

Bringing a student who is in danger of failing mathematics, for example, to a position where they pass their exams – but more importantly understand how it works – should be recognised in any measure of performance.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

How will we acclimatise as we ease out of Covid?

Dave O'Connell

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Back in the world before Covid, a mention of Corona either brought to mind a beer or a rock band – but, as we ease our way out of dire straits (another rock band, as luck would have it), we might require a different kind of acclimatisation.

Because what will the evening be like when no more deaths are flashed up as a statistic on the Six-One News?

Who will the world turn to if we have no more Fergal or George or Zara giving out the daily update in a funereal tone?

What will happen to all the people who used to go to the Department of Health press conference at tea-time in the same way the rest of us once headed for the pub?

Like Pavlov’s Dog, we’ve come to expect an evening illness update, taking consolation in it being two less than yesterday or taking fright if it’s two more.

Nobody told us who these poor people were, unless the local paper carried a tribute a week later – for the number crunchers and bean counters and prophets of doom, they were today’s statistics, to be flashed up for a few seconds every night.

And we took these figures as we got them, never questioning if a person died from Covid or with Covid; if they were described as having ‘underlying conditions’, we seemed to accept that as a very broad church.

We listened intently as Fergal or George or Zara told us what the mean age was, breathing a small sigh of relief if it remained a good distance into the future from our own age now.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Home ownership should be a prerogative – not a pipedream

Dave O'Connell

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Half of our 18 to 34-year-olds fear they won’t be able to buy a home in next ten years, according to a new survey. That’s not the shock – it’s the fact that half of them think they actually will.

Because the truth is that owning your own home hasn’t been as much of a pipedream since the days of feudal landlords; indeed many of them will find it a job and a half to even come up with the rent.

And that’s a sign of just how critical our housing crisis has become in the space of a single generation.

We thought that things were bad in the eighties when unemployment levels were way ahead of our pre-Covid figures; when the boat and the plane were the best 0or maybe only – chance for many to secure a job far from home.

But for those who were working, owning a home wasn’t a farfetched concept at all, because there were plenty of starter homes being built and the cost of them still bore some relation to your income.

There was a time before that, when the bank had a simple equation to decide the size of the mortgage they’d give you. It was two and a half times the combined salary for those buying the house – in other words, yours alone if you were a sole purchaser, or double that if it was yourself and your partner.

On top of that, there was no point turning up in the first place unless you had a ten per cent deposit – so it was a straight-forward calculation to find out what you could afford. And house prices, for the most part, kept within that equation.

Of course there were always homes you coveted and couldn’t afford, but you could still buy a roof over your head for a price that only took 20 years to pay back.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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