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A Different View

When it comes to talk it’s all in the way you tell ‘em

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Mopping up the water from the windows of the announcer's cabin during the heavy rainfall before the start of the Intermediate Camogie final replay between Oranmore Maree and Eyrecourt at St Brendan's Park, Loughrea, on Sunday. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There’s a story often told from some time back of a night that Castleblaney’s man mountain Big Tom McBride and his band turned up for a dance at a venue in New York – only to find the room packed to the rafters with disorientated drug addicts.

The problem, of course, lay with the posters advertising this event as starring a band called Big Tom and the Mainliners – leading the addled addicts to believe that this was a giant needle fest in the heart of the Big Apple.

Four Roads to Glenamaddy is all good well but these guys were hoping for a higher destination with a much shorter, if more hazardous, journey to get there.

Country music was the backdrop to another name game around that same time, when the player they called the Black Flash, Laurie Cunningham, was setting the old English First Division alight.

Back in 1977, he left his first club Leyton Orient for the city lights of West Bromwich Albion, then managed by one half of Ireland’s latest dancing sensations, Johnny Giles.

This was long before Johnny sold his soul for thirty pieces of chocolate; back then he was gainfully deployed trying to put together the footballing equivalent of the Ford plant in Daghenham by surrounding himself with a collection of old Irish pros at the club.

Galway’s old manager Paddy Mulligan was among them as were Mick Martin and the man who still holds the record for Irish international away trips, Ray Treacy – most of the trips, it has to be said, were undertaken as a travel agent.

But Ray was never slow with a word in any company and when Gilesy introduced their new superstar left winger to the rest of the players, Ray told him he was a great admirer of his talent.

“I have all your albums at home,” he told the bemused Black Flash, before revealing that his favourite recording of all had to be the anthemic ballad, Lovely Leitrim.

Ray was talking of Larry Cunningham, of course, the man from North Longford whose gravelly tones will also always be associated with those Forty Shades of Green.

But for the rest of his WBA career, Laurie was known as Lovely Leitrim by a squad where only the Irish lads had a clue what the joke was.

It’s not known if he carried his nickname with him to Real Madrid or any of his other eight subsequent clubs before he was killed, at the tender age of 33, in a car crash in Spain outside his adopted home in Madrid.

The point of all this is simple – a name in one part of the world can have an entirely different connotation in another. And conversely a pun, a phrase or an acronym in one place may mean absolutely nothing – or something highly offensive – somewhere else.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Phone zombies add additional degree of difficulty for walkers

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There was a time that students communicated with home about once every blue moon – and only then if they’d ran out of money. There was no real point in writing or phoning home for any other reason.

But now it appears they can’t be out of contact for more than a minute – or at least that’s how it looks if you try to negotiate a way through the hoards of them that stride four-abreast down the street, not one of them looking in the direction their feet are taking them.

They are on their phones, communicating with someone although probably not home – because they give off an intensity and urgency that suggests this messaging couldn’t possibly have waiting until they reached their destination.

Either that or they have become so dependent on Sat Nav that they fear they wouldn’t find their way to college without Google Maps – and so they walk, head down, staring at the screen, oblivious to other pedestrians or even telegraph poles.

And as you dodge around them, you wonder what’s so important that it won’t wait until they’re sitting down somewhere; have they a shares portfolio that has taken a hammering on the morning’s trading?

More likely, they’re watching TikTok or videos on YouTube, while wandering in public spaces like the last of the headless zombies.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Twenty one years after the day the world stood still in horror

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s hard to believe that this week marked 21 years since we were stopped in our tracks at the sight of two planes exploding at full speed into the sides of the Twin Towers – not alone taking down part of New York’s iconic skyline but rocking our world to its core.

We may have missed the first plane, but every one of us can remember exactly where we were as the second plane followed suit, careering through the smoke of the first crash to explode in front of the eyes of the world.

It was so shocking it was difficult to even take in; the first incident might have been a tragedy caused by pilot error or illness – but there was no mistaking the deliberate intent when the same act of terrorism was repeated just 17 minutes later.

And this time the terrorists had the eyes of the world on their act, because we’d tuned into the live pictures of the smoke billowing from the North Tower – to see the hijackers crash UA Flight 175 into floors 75 to 85 of the South Tower, killing everyone on board and hundreds inside the building.

I was working in the Irish Star at the time, where we had one television halfway down the newsroom. With the time difference between Dublin and New York, it was just coming up to 2pm, when the management team met to discuss the news stories for next day’s paper.

It didn’t take a brainstorming session to work out what would fill the paper, and the global news agenda, the next day – except it was already impossible to annunciate just what had happened live on every television station on the planet.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Memories of floppy disks – once the future but now firmly the past

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Dave O'Connell
Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

While watching an old crime drama on the telly recently, the sight of two detectives storing their evidence on a floppy disk brought back memories of a time when we thought our first or second-generation computers were at the cutting edge – little knowing that, within years, the floppy would be as obsolete at the typewriter.

The irony of course is that they weren’t floppy at all because they were housed in a hard plastic case, but without doubt they were gamechangers; a small square not much bigger than a playing card and yet it could store the contents of a large office cabinet on it, with room to spare.

And even if technology has since advanced so far that we’d store all of that and more on the pinhead of a needle, that’s just evolution. The floppy disk was the trigger for a revolution.

We’d never lose another story we’d written; we could store contact numbers (in a time when Data Protection wasn’t even a twinkle in some Ombudsman’s eye), transfer information from one computer to another – and just marvel at how far the world had come in our lifetime.

The computers themselves were also wonders to behold; an electronic screen with a little green cursor pulsating like a beating heart, allowing you to go backwards as well as forwards and clear up your spelling mistakes without the aid of Tippex.

Newsrooms used to be cacophonies of clacking typewriters and ringing phones – reporters slamming the carriage return like they had a vendetta against it and those traditional devices of communication ringing away, possibly because the intended recipient was away in a pub.

Within a generation, the newsroom became almost as quiet as a library as reporters gently tapped computer keys, and they no longer had to rely on desk phones because their lives were liberated by the arrival of the mobile.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

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