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A Different View

When did we just become another era in history ?

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The recent 100,000 Steps for Cormac – in memory of Cormac Connolly, who died after a courageous battle with cancer – succeeded in its target of raising €100,000 for Pieta House. Pictured at the handover of a cheque for almost €102,000 are Cormac’s family and event organisers (front – from left) Joe Burke, Deirdre Costello, Kieran O'Brien from Pieta House, Cormac’s mother Mary Connolly, Ellen Connolly, Donna Burke and Johnnie Togher from Pieta House, with (back) Martin Connolly, Sean Connolly, Mícheál Connolly, Joe Connolly, Cormac’s father Murt Connolly and James Connolly.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It wasn’t so much that the English Heritage Council conferred a Grade II listing on a concrete skateboard park last week – it was the corollary that 1978 is now officially ancient history.

Because that’s when the Rom in east London, the first skatepark in Europe to get listed status, was developed.

So if it is now a protected structure because of its historical value, it is fair to assume that 1978 – the year that gave us Grease, Meat Loaf, Argentina winning the World Cup; a year after Teenage Kicks – is now just a footnote in history as well.

Before 1978, we had only one television channel – and then RTE2 arrived in a blaze of glory and with a line-up of stars that included Terry Wogan, Val Doonican, Gemma Craven and Maureen Potter, Ronnie Barker and Liberace.

Back in 1978, the Pope didn’t even know where Ballybrit was – not least because the Pope at the start of 1978 was Paul VI and the next fellow, John Paul I, lasted just 33 days, which is around the same length now as a Leeds United manager.

Admittedly when you write it down, it can seem like a while ago for sure – but you don’t want to see your most memorable years boxed off into the dim and distant past.

It was bad enough dozing off in the middle of the news and waking up halfway through Reeling in the Years and now knowing they’d changed the programme.

But now your yesterdays – your prime, your halcyon days, your seminal moments – are officially confined to the history books.

And of course deep down we knew this already – we know it when we look at Johnny Giles, for one.

We remember the midfield general with the curly hair, who could turn on a sixpence; and now when he’s analysing a World Cup match he looks like he should have a blanket for his knees before he doses off.

And as we explain to the kids that he used to be able to turn on a sixpence, we also have to tell them what a sixpence was.

But we still see him and Chippy Brady in those green jerseys before sponsorship, playing at Dalymount Park before they moved to a ground named after an insurance company.

We could name the Argentina team that won that World Cup – Kempes, Passarella, Ardiles, Luque, Tarantini and Jimmy Magee’s favourite, Daniel Bertoni – but we couldn’t tell you two of them now after Messi and de Maria.

We know we’re still clinging to the wreckage when our new albums for Christmas are all remasters of bands from the eighties – Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Queen, AC/DC, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen and the Who, to name but a few.

And then, again – to further underline the generation gap – we probably have to explain what an album is.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Sporting rivalry doesn’t have to mean segregated supporters

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Three sporting teams whose boundaries come up to the back door of each other’s patch were all in action at the one venue – two of them against each other – at the weekend.

If it was the Premiership, it wouldn’t – and couldn’t – have happened because there would be carnage either inside or outside the ground . . .or both.

But this was Pearse Stadium and the county senior football championship, an afternoon’s entertainment that might not have been on Sky Sports’ radar, but which was no less crucial for those with a vested interest all the same.

First up, Oughterard were up against their nearest neighbours Killannin for a semi-final place, while the other leg of this local stool saw reigning champions Moycullen successfully put their crown on the line against Tuam Stars.

It goes without saying that the crowd was in the high hundreds or low thousands; this wasn’t Old Trafford or Anfield with 60,000 or 70,000 fans congregating from all corners of the globe, never mind the country.

So it wasn’t Celtic and Rangers or City against United; it was neighbours and families and friends intermingled all in one place, albeit wearing different colours.

And even allowing for the intensity of local rivalries, the ties that bind are infinitely stronger than the boundaries that divide.

Half the Killannin team went to school in Oughterard. The Monaghans, who line out for Oughterard, are sons of Terence who was steeped in Moycullen football before moving parish.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Homework only goes to prove parents haven’t all the answers

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Anyone fortunate enough to be a parent will always remember the moment when their child transitioned from unqualified hero worship to thinking that ma and da, if not quite clowns, at least possessed feet of clay.

And that moment often coincided with the time you could no longer make head nor tail of their homework.

You were grand with addition and subtraction, even multiplication and basic division – but when theorems or algebra or physics or foreign languages came into the equation, suddenly your infallible status took a nosedive straight into the nearest bin.

The consolation is that we are not alone – because most parents admit they’ve forgotten even the basics from their schooldays, leaving them cruelly exposed when the teenagers come looking for help.

A recent UK survey asked 1,500 parents aged over 30 what they had forgotten from their schooldays.

Top of the list was algebra – forgotten by half of them – followed by trigonometry and Pythagoras’s Theorem. About a third of respondents could no longer remember how to do long division – or name ten or more elements from the periodic table.

A quarter didn’t know the difference between an isosceles and a scalene triangle, and almost a fifth had forgotten how to use a protractor. Most of those probably thought a compass was for pricking the back of the student sitting in front of you.

Other classroom classics now lost in the sands of time included a failure to recognise cloud formations, identifying an oxbow lake, remembering quotes from Shakespeare, or explaining the difference between volts and amps.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Everybody knows a Dave – but it still don’t make a storm

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s been a tough week for Ireland’s Daves and Davids – ever since we found out just how close we were to having our own storm, only to have it snatched away from us by a public vote that inexplicably went for Dudley instead.

It doesn’t matter than Dudley hardly even sounds like a gust of wind, let alone a gale force storm; it just conjures up an image of a drunken Dudley Moore in Arthur, meandering all over the place – more of a danger to himself than the roof of your house is.

The only consolation is that, if it wasn’t Dudley, it still wouldn’t have been Dave – because in compiling the shortlist, our own Queen of the Weather Forecast, Evelyn Cusack, made a stronger case for Storm Diarmuid, ahead of Dave, David and even Dafydd.

The Brits were keen on Storm Dave, but part of the reason that there is an annual debate among the Met Offices is to ensure a disparate selection, with something for each of the participating nationalities.

That’s why we got Barra, Pól, Seán and Méabh, and the Welsh got Arwen and possibly Gladys, and the Dutch got Vergil and Willemien, with a couple of crossover names like Jack and Kim and Ruby in there for good measure.

But when it came to Storm D, our Met Éireann boss wouldn’t even entertain Dermot as a compromise over Diarmuid, according to the correspondence on this year’s storm-naming process, as revealed under Freedom of Information this week.

Ultimately, it didn’t matter in the end because the people decided anyway. They were given a choice of Duncan, Dudley and Dafydd. . .and Dudley was the winner, perhaps – the commentators think – because of Dudley Dursley, erstwhile star of Harry Potter. As opposed to Dudley Moore.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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