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Galway Bay FM News Archives

War in a peaceful setting . . . the battle of the strawberries

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Date Published: 23-Jun-2011

It’s the most peaceful scene you could imagine – our quiet, suburban back garden. Indeed anytime we get a few days when you might get out of that wind that seems to blow just about every day, I sit out and read a paper.

But it has turned into a battleground. You see I have a taste for fresh strawberries . . . but so have the slugs who seem to hide away in the undergrowth until my guard is down.

The war was finally declared when one of them cheekily stole the very first berry of the crop, one which I had been watching fatten and ripen for a few days and had been tempted to guzzle on at least one occasion.

Now, don’t get this wrong. I’m not some fanatic gardener who has been angered. I am ashamed to say that my gardening efforts come to precisely nil – but I do like to sit out on a sunny day, I have been known to take a drink in a sort of deck chair which was bought in a local shop some years ago, and I am, above all, partial to fresh strawberries.

Of course I know that you can get Irish strawberries in the supermarket for ridiculous figures like €6 for two punnets. You can buy them from youngsters on the roadsides, and maybe even a few spuds along with them.

The difference in this case is that these would be OUR strawberries, cultivated by another’s hand, but happily gobbled by yours truly.

The strawberries had been a little slow in coming on – my theory is because of the unseasonable cold of the wind betimes. But Wimbledon was about to start, the temptation to look at the strawberry bed was strong and there was one delicious looking berry that had grown plump and needed maybe one more day’s ripening.

Imagine my horror the following morning when I approached the strawberry bed only to find that, during the night, ‘Mister Slug’ had devoured precisely half of my prize strawberry. Instant ‘war’ was declared.

But my problem is that my sworn enemy is nocturnal and, dammit, I’m not prepared to sit up all night watching out for him. I’m not prepared to put out those slug killers, which are hardly guaranteed to improve the flavour of my strawberries, so I have had to take to the pre-emptive strike, by taking the berries and ripening them inside, if necessary.

It brings back memories of a much sophisticated ‘war’ which my late father fought every year as the time came up for the Tuam Agricultural Show and he prepared produce of all shapes and sizes for competition and the spuds, tomatoes, carrots, parsnips, vegetable marrows, were cosseted like children in the week coming up to the big day of competition.

My dad was in the employ

of the Bon Secours Sisters who ran the Children’s Home, and among a million other duties that came with being the man in charge of umpteen things from maintenance to gardening, the head gardener post became pivotal in the run up to the Tuam Agricultural Show.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway Bay FM News Archives

Galway ‘Park and Ride’ could become permanent

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Date Published: 07-May-2013

A park ‘n’ ride scheme from Carnmore into Galway city could become a permanent service if there is public demand.

That’s according to the Chief Executive of Galway Chamber of Commerce, Michael Coyle.

The pilot scheme will begin at 7.20 next Monday morning, May 13th.

Motorists will be able to park cars at the airport carpark in Carnmore and avail of a bus transfer to Forster Street in the city.

Buses will depart every 20 minutes at peak times and every 30 minutes at offpeak times throughout the day, at a cost of 2 euro per journey.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Tuam awaits UK hay import as overnight rainfall adds to fodder crisis

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Date Published: 09-May-2013

Tuam is now awaiting a third import of hay from the UK as overnight rainfall has increased pressure on farmers struggling to source fodder.

A total of ten loads are expected at Connacht Gold stores throughout the West with a load expected at the Airglooney outlet this evening or tomorrow.

Farmers throughout the county have been struggling to cope with the animal feed shortage and a below than normal grass growth due to unseasonal weather conditions.

Overnight rainfall in the Galway area has also added to the problem making ground conditions in many areas are quite poor.

Joe Waldron, Agricultual Advisor with Connacht Gold says farmers in short supply can contact the Airglooney outlet on 093 – 24101.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Transport Minister urges end to Bus Eireann strike action

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Date Published: 12-May-2013

The Transport Minister is urging drivers at Bus Éireann to engage in talks with management, in an effort to bring their strike action to an end.

There were no Bus Éireann services operating out of Galway today as a result of nationwide strike action by staff affiliated with the national bus and rail union.

Up to 20 Bus Éireann drivers are continuing to picket outside the bus depot at the docks in the city this evening.

Drivers from other unions have decided not to cross the picket line and go into work today – causing the disruption to be even worse.

Bus drivers are protesting against five million euro worth of cuts to their overtime and premium pay – cuts which Bus Eireann says are vital to ensure the future viability of the company.

The majority of services nationwide are disrupted, and the union say strike action will continue until management are willing to go back into negotiations.

However, it’s not expected to affect school services next week.

Galway bay fm news understands that around 70 percent, or over 100 Galway bus Eireann drivers are affiliated with the NBRU.

 

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