The tough Galway hurler who stood up to Christy Ring

Date Published: 24-Jan-2013

FORMER Galway hurler Ned Quinn may be due to celebrate his 90th birthday in May, but his humour and mind is as sharp as ever. Yes, the good days bleed into the bad – and vice versa – but the essence of the Ardrahan man burns brighter than ever.

In the foyer of Kilcolgan Nursing Home, Ned, accompanied by his daughter Irene, sits patiently waiting. He says he is only 5ft10” but he has the aura of man of far greater stature. He later explains that he did a bit of boxing in his youth and, looking at him, it does answer a few questions.

On this day, Ned’s health is betwixt and between but, even so, his humour is truly captivating and, before the interview concludes, he chuckles: “What kind of a cash prize did they give you to talk to me? Ah, I am only joking.”

The answer furnished was quite simple, if not a little on the manipulative side. “They told me you would tell me the truth about Christy Ring?” Ned relaxes with a wry smile.

Do you remember it Ned? “I think I do.”

 

Where you involved? “Maybe a little.” He pauses. “We won’t go back on it.”

Folklore has it that, after Galway’s defeat to Cork in the 1953 All-Ireland final, there was a couple of dust-ups between the respective players back at the Gresham Hotel. The first happened in the aftermath of the game that evening before Ring was left on the seat of his pants in another ‘frank’ exchange the following morning. That was the point Ned was understood to have entered the ‘debate’.

In many respects, it all stemmed from Galway’s disappointment and frustration. Earlier in the day, they were defeated 3-3 to 0-8 by the Leesiders and it still irks the former half-back that they put more scores on the board but lost the game.

“We had no luck on the day,” says the 89-year-old, who alludes to a high profile incident in which Galway defender and captain Mickey Burke was taken out of the game . . . allegedly, by Ring. “He (Ring) got away with murder on the field,” says Ned. “I mean, sure he could knock down anyone he wanted and get away with it.”

Ned believes that, because Ring was such a legend, he was given more leeway by referees and officials. “He was a crowd favourite . . . even with the great Tipp team that time, he could do what he liked with them. And he did do what he liked with them. He would give you a sup of the hurl any way he could – just as he was passing you out. Ah, he could handle himself.”

You get a sense that Ned has come to appreciate that and when it later comes to citing his greatest hurlers of all time, Ring tops the list. No wonder then the Galway game-plan going into that All-Ireland in ’53 was to keep the ball away from him but that was easier said than done.

At any rate, Ned says Galway’s luck was just not in that afternoon. “Every team needs a bit of luck on the day. The first goal was a kind of mystery goal. It went out beside his (goalkeeper Sean Duggan’s) ear and straight into the goal. Then the other two should have been cleared in time.

“I was playing in the half-back line when Burke was knocked down. Ring laid him out. Burke had to go off, he was badly hurt. Teeth or stitches. I was sent out on Ring then and I wasn’t going to stand for the same treatment, no, no. I was ready for him. Of course, we had a few words.”

Ned, who was on the Galway minor squad of 1941 but did not make his senior debut for Galway against Laois until 1949, played against Cork just once after that and he says it was “a cynical game”. He notes, though, that the 1953 final was certainly a missed opportunity to take the Liam McCarthy Cup back West.

That said, the father-of-two – Ena is his other daughter – did enjoy his days in the maroon and white, just as he did in the colours of his native Ardrahan, with whom he appeared in three county finals, winning just the one against favourites Loughrea in 1949.

That 1-9 to 2-2 county final win, played in front of a record hurling final crowd, was Ardrahan’s first senior championship victory in over 40 years and it was built on a rock-solid defence, marshalled by centre-half back Ned. Other prominent figures were Miko McInerney, Colm Corless, Paddy Hoarty, Simon Moylan, Bill Joe Coen, Sean Bermingham and Lowry Murray.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.