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Substantial increase in number of homes being built in Galway this year

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Substantial increase in number of homes being built in Galway this year

The number of homes being built across Galway city and county so far this year has already exceeded 2023’s end of year total.

Work has begun on building 1,109 homes across Galway city and county in the first four months of this year.


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While by the END of 2023, 1,172 construction commencement notices had been received by both local authorities.

Nationally, work has begun on the building of over 30 thousand new homes in the first 4 months of this year.

Brian Hayes Chief Executive of the BPFI says almost half of the new homes being built are apartments.

The post Substantial increase in number of homes being built in Galway this year appeared first on Galway Bay FM.

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Top names feature in Town Hall’s new season

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Top names feature in Town Hall’s new season Top names feature in Town Hall’s new season

Comedian, actor, author and presenter Graham Norton, actress Marie Mullen and mentalist and magician Keith Barry are among the big names from Irish theatre and entertainment who feature in the Town Hall’s Summer/Autumn line up.

Theatre highlights in July include Druid Theatre Company with its production of Samuel Beckett’s Endgame, directed by Garry Hynes and starring Mullen alongside Bosco Hogan, Aaron Monaghan and Rory Nolan.

The Landmark/Galway International Arts Festival world premiere of Mark O Rowe’s play a which features many of Ireland’s finest actors including Cathy Belton, Catherine Walker and Robert Sheehan, will also be staged for the Festival.

Druid return in September with a new production of The House by Tom Murphy, directed by Garry Hynes, while Decadent bring their anticipated production of the Brian Friel classic Molly Sweeney, directed by Andrew Flynn.

July kicks off with the 36th Galway Film Fleadh featuring the best of new Irish cinema (with 100+ screenings, including the critically acclaimed opening film Kneecap), alongside award-winning films from around the world.

The Town Hall Summer/Autumn schedule features two musicals. Twin Productions present Disney’s Beauty and The Beast for all the family, and the Morgan Brothers will stage the world premiere of The Lack of Laura by Kurt Rosenberg.

An eclectic music programme includes an anniversary performance of the acclaimed Bird On The Wire featuring the songs of Leonard Cohen, and flamenco sounds and dance from Daniel Martinez.

There will be book, spoken-word and podcast events from Graham Norton, David Mc Williams and Nial Bressie Breslin, and comedy from Serena Terry, Kyla Cobbler and Garron Noone. eclectic Little Cinema/Galway City of Film will present a series of eclectic films and the Architecture on the Edge Festival will also be presented at the venue.

Information about the Summer/Autumn programme – including details of Galway Film Fleadh and Arts Festival events – is published in the Town Hall’s latest brochure, which is now available to download at www.tht.ie or from the venue, 091 569777.

Tickets for all Town Hall and Black Box performances, screenings from July to September are now on sale.

Pictured: Graham Norton

 

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Tom gets to truth of life with one-man show about lying

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Tom gets to truth of life with one-man show about lying Tom gets to truth of life with one-man show about lying

“It’s not a play about blaming parents. It’s a love letter to them for their openness and honesty, for helping me to let go,”

So says Dubliner Tom Moran about his one-man show, Tom Moran is a Big Fat Filthy Disgusting Liar, which comes to Druid’s Mick Lally Theatre this Friday and Saturday night, June 21 and 22.

The current version of this memorably titled piece premiered in the Peacock stage of the Abbey Theatre last month and comes to Galway at the end of an island-wide tour.

Its first ever outing was at the 2022 Dublin Fringe Festival when it won the Fishamble New Writing Award and also had a successful run at the Edinburgh Theatre Festival. It has since been given a different ending because, as Tom says, “life is different. I am a year older than when I first did it and this is a more honest ending for now”.

This one-hour show has a three-act structure as he delves into his past, exploring the memory of a youthful lie. And this self-proclaimed people-pleaser and expert in empathy who struggles with the truth, goes on to explore the nature and impact of lying, so that he can untangle his current life.

“The first act is about childhood and an amazing lie I told as a child, the second is how that child grew into a man and how he lied to hide his emotions,” Tom explains,

By that, he means “not being true to yourself or in relationships, not trusting who you are in the world”.

The third part is about going back to childhood to fix that inability to be honest with himself.

He did that with his parents, “in a therapy setting where we sat down and had a conversation about childhood”, and they helped him refine the vague memories he had of certain events.

“Even if you can’t remember, the body keeps the score,” says Tom of childhood experiences. That’s what’s at the heart of this show which originally started life as a novel before he realised that a theatre structure suited it better.

He distils the story of his life to date “through the lens of lying”, but offering “a very honest analysis of childhood and how it affects the person you grow into”.

The Abbey Theatre’s Artistic Director Caitríona McLaughlin feels its important to tour this show.

“Tom succeeds in creating  great drama by employing humour and a keen dramatic intelligence to talking openly and honestly about his shame”, according to Caitríona who  believes the play “highlights a significant moment of change in Irish behaviour and in our culture”.

And audiences have been responding to it brilliantly, saysTom.

“Sometimes they laugh and sometimes they are affronted by ideas in the play and don’t like me much at the start. But even thought it’s structured to within an inch of its life, I leave space for a conversation with me and an audience. No other art form does that.”

Tom is learning that “every audience sees something new in it and so I’m still learning about the play”.

He loves that every night is different because of the audience response, he adds, “whether they are leaning into the comedy or if they are happy to go with the serious”.

And there are serious moments in this piece, where he explores issues such as trauma, addiction and body shame, “but as a professional writer you can go further with the darkness if you sprinkle a bit of light as well”, says Tom.

Tom Moran is a Big Fat Filthy Disgusting Liar is at Druid’s Mick Lally Theatre this Friday and Saturday at 8pm nightly. Tickets €22 / €20 concession at www.druid.ie.

Pictured: Tom Moran

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Blackrock Tower ‘mistake’ puts divers over the edge

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Blackrock Tower ‘mistake’ puts divers over the edge Blackrock Tower ‘mistake’ puts divers over the edge

Regular swimmers in Salthill expressed concerns this week that barriers installed on the Blackrock Diving Tower were ‘the beginning of the end’ for the almost 70-year-old iconic amenity.

This comes after a ‘health and safety’ intervention from Galway City Council resulted in the blocking of all exits off the middle section of the tower last week.

Over the weekend, divers were stunned to find the second level of the tower rendered useless as new barriers were erected closing off all access points.

Area councillors were contacted by outraged divers and, having not been informed of the move in advance, they were later informed that the works had been “done on safety grounds”.

In an email to councillors, seen by the Galway City Tribune, it was set out that just two access points were due to be closed off, while two others had been blocked ‘by mistake’.

“Galway City Council had a contractor in to close off two of the access points on the middle platform of the tower. These are the jumping points directly below the jumping points on the top platform.

“There were issues with people jumping off the middle and top platforms at these locations at the same time, putting themselves at risk of landing on top of each other.

“The contractor mistakenly closed off all points on the middle platform. Once we were made aware of this, Galway City Council organised the removal of two of the barriers that were put in incorrectly.”

The “mistakenly” placed barriers, which were measured and made to size, have since been removed.

Local Councillor Clodagh Higgins (FG) said no information about these plans had been given to local representatives in advance of the move, nor had regular swimmers been told about the works.

Pictured: One of the new barriers erected at the middle level of the Blackrock Tower.

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United doing better than expected ahead of clash with table toppers Shelbourne

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

United doing better than expected ahead of clash with table toppers Shelbourne United doing better than expected ahead of clash with table toppers Shelbourne

A lot of the Galway United squad were swapping the training ground for the beach this week, and they will do so quietly satisfied at an impressive return from the first-half of the club’s first season back in the top flight in seven years.

With the league on a midseason break until Friday next, June 28, a number of United players were heading home from Eamonn Deacy Park last Friday to pack their bags for a trip to the airport the following day, and it is a break that assistant manager, Ollie Horgan, says they fully deserve.

“They certainly do, they have to have that break, have time with their families and friends, that is hugely important. They have been at it non-stop since January and they’ll be at it from tomorrow week [which is this coming Saturday] each and every day until whenever it is in November that we finish,” Horgan said in light of the 3-0 win over Drogheda United last Friday.

Some players, like Conor McCormack, were heading away for a few days with family. Others had a more, shall we say, ‘lively’ break planned: Garry Buckley was heading to Benidorm for his stag party, ahead of his wedding in November.

They will have embarked on whatever kind of trip they had planned in good form thanks to last Friday’s win. United had suffered back-to-back defeats going into the game, and with a visit to league leaders Shelbourne their first call of port when action resumes, it was important they didn’t slip-up against Drogheda.

Far from it: they put in their most impressive display of the season when brushing aside the challenge of the Louth club to leave them on 30 points from their first 20 games of the season, closer to the top of the table than the basement battle which many had tipped them to be involved in.

Pictured: Galway United’s Stephen Walsh celebrates scoring his first goal against Drogheda with teammates Conor McCormack, Ed McCarthy and David Hurley during Thursday’s Premier Division clash at Eamonn Deacy Park. Photo: Iain McDonald.

 

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Galway must be on red alert for key tie

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

Galway must be on red alert for key tie Galway must be on red alert for key tie

THERE is little point in building Monaghan up to something they are not, but their challenge in Saturday’s All-Ireland Preliminary quarter-final at Pearse Stadium (4pm) shouldn’t be dismissed out of hand.

And judging from the loose talk around Galway this week, the Tribesmen’s passage to the last eight of the championship is seen almost as a done deal. It’s a dangerous backdrop to the fixture.

Apart from Galway having to lift themselves after gifting Armagh a draw at Markievicz Park last Sunday – an outcome which denied them a direct route to the quarter-finals – there is no doubt that Monaghan have turned a corner.

After a terrific victory over Dublin at Croke Park in the National League in late January, Monaghan’s form fell off a cliff, failing to win another game in Division 1 and ending up being relegated.

It brought an end to a decade-long stay in the top-flight for the Farney men who had been living dangerously in relation to their league status over the previous five years, including when relegating Galway in 2021 thanks to a Jack McCarron point in the dying throes of extra-time.

Following their league relegation, Monaghan’s confidence wouldn’t have been great for the Ulster championship, and it was hardly a big surprise when they fell to neighbours Cavan (3-12 to 1-12) in a preliminary round fixture.

Worse was to follow against Kerry in Killarney in their opening round-robin tie of the All-Ireland series. Monaghan only managed two points in the first-half and eventually fell to a heavy 0-24 to 1-11 defeat.

They looked like a team on borrowed time in the championship but rallied to force a draw with Louth in their next outing – a result which ended an eight-match losing run – before a relatively comfortable success over an admittedly average Meath team at the weekend.

Significantly, their manager Vinny Corey said afterwards that it was Monaghan’s first taste of knock-out football this year and it helped to focus them. Remember too, they reached last year’s All-Ireland semi-finals when suffering an honourable loss to Dublin (1-17 to 0-13).

Corey, the former Monaghan defender, also said: “On this day two weeks, there’s going to be just four teams left in the championship – it’s what you do in the next two weeks that counts. And other teams haven’t played a knock championship match yet. We have. We’ve played out first and we won. So, we’ll take that and move on.”

Pictured: Galway manager Padraic Joyce, selector John Concannon and coach Cian O’Neill have a final briefing before their clash with Armagh at Markievicz Park on Sunday. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile.

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€45m transformation of Dexcom Stadium back on schedule after Covid setback

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

€45m transformation of Dexcom Stadium back on schedule after Covid setback €45m transformation of Dexcom Stadium back on schedule after Covid setback

By Brendan Carroll

Connacht Rugby are seeking more time to complete the €45m redevelopment of their Dexcom Stadium home, formerly the Sportsground.

Planning permission for the transformation of the venue, which will expand its crowd capacity to 12,000, was granted by Galway City Council in May 2019 – but that is due to officially expire in a few weeks’ time.

However, the advent of the Covid 19 pandemic and global supply disruption made it impossible to meet the original timescale for completing the development.

Now, Connacht Rugby have applied for an extension of time on that permission, up to a maximum of three years – though they expect that the work will be completed by December next year.

Work has begun in earnest, and is on schedule, on a project that will radically change a venue which has been at the heart of sport in Galway for almost a century.

The Clan Terrace – known as the Clan Stand by supporters, but in reality a covered terrace – was demolished a number of weeks ago after the team’s last home game of the season in May, with the existing clubhouse also going.

A new North Stand will be built on the site over four levels, by contractors Conack Construction, with bars, shops and catering facilities, and a crowd capacity of around 7,000.

There will be a standing terrace at the front for 1,900, then 4,000 seats at the next level, while on the upper level there will be corporate facilities catering for around 900, which will double as a conference and hospitality venue.

Construction also began in March on a new state-of-the-art High Performance Centre, on the site of the old side-pitch at the ground. Built alongside the existing gym, it will be the home of day-to-day operations at the club, with dressing rooms, physio areas, two canteens, and office space for pro team management and admin staff.

Pictured: How the completed North Stand will look.

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‘Mickey Mouse’ Mathias sticks it to online bullies

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

‘Mickey Mouse’ Mathias sticks it to online bullies ‘Mickey Mouse’ Mathias sticks it to online bullies

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Joyce Mathias, Green Party candidate in City East, suffered online trolling during the recent Local Election campaign.

The abuse was mostly to do with her skin colour – she’s a Black woman originally from Nigeria – and her distinctive hair.

Children were drawn to her hair, she said. “Kids love me, they were telling their parents to vote for me,” Joyce said.

But it brought bile out in online trolls and from those on the far right, who labelled her Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse and worse.

Mathias did not let the bullies win, though. And she beat them at their own game, with the help of her daughter.

Kelly (21) designed a t-shirt for her mother, which included Mathias’ face, and distinctive hair, alongside the Disney cartoon characters Mickey, Minnie and Daffy Duck.

She posted it to Twitter, two fingers to her detractors.

“I didn’t care about the bullying. It’s something I have learned not to affect me. They think they are upsetting me with Minnie Mouse and Mickey Mouse and my hair. It’s actually a trademark for me. When they say ‘Hi Minnie or Mickey Mouse’ I just smile back. You’ve got to give it back to the bullies,” she told us.

Though she did not take a seat, Mathias was pleased with 287 first preference votes in her first election.

Will she be back in 2029? “Five years is too far – I’ll take one day at a time,” she said.

Pictured: Joyce Mathias with her Mickey Mouse t-shirt. ‘You’ve got to give it back to the bullies.’

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50 refugees for hostel in city centre

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From this week's Galway City Tribune

From this week's Galway City Tribune

50 refugees for hostel in city centre 50 refugees for hostel in city centre

A tourist hostel in Galway City centre is to be used to accommodate 50 refugees.

The International Protection applicants will be accommodated in 15 ensuite bedrooms of the Savoy Hostel on Eglinton Street, opposite the main city post office.

The Department of Children, Equality, Disability, Integration and Youth also confirmed that Waterloo House, a former B&B in Clifden, will provide 58 beds for people seeking refuge in Ireland in two phases.

In both cases, the Department said the accommodation “will be for families of international protection applicants”.

Maplestar Limited own the Savoy Hostel and have been providing accommodation to IPAS “for over 20 years at a number of centres under contract to the Department”.

Maplestar was the provider of the Eglinton Direct Provision centre in Salthill. According to Dáil records, it was also providing emergency accommodation last year at the Sentinel Building in Ballymun, Dublin.

According to its 2022 financial statement, the parent company of Maplestar Ltd was Foxfield Inns, owned by members of the well-known Galway Flannery family.

Pictured: The Savoy Hostel on Eglinton Street, which will house 50 International Protection applicants.

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