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A Different View

Stark reality of ageing process is in the jeans

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Galway native, Senator Billy Lawless, was among the honourees at the Irish Echo’s eighth annual Golden Bridges Conference in Boston, where he accepted his award from Anna Ní Ghallchóir, Chairperson of Údarás na Gaeltachta, one of the sponsors of the awards which were also attended by Minister for the Diaspora Joe McHugh and the Mayor of Boston Martin Walsh.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Apparently, some international survey decided that the maximum age for a man wearing jeans is 53 – which gives me almost exactly a year to break the habit.

Beyond the magic age of 53, according to this survey carried out by the parcel delivery service CollectPlus, denim just suggests an old man trying to cling onto his youth.

The female equivalent is apparently leather trousers – where the age for a man wearing leather trousers is arguably 22, unless he’s in a rock band or is a member of a secret club that meets in a dark dungeon.

It’s true that jeans don’t so much cling to the curves in your fifties, as emphasise the onset of furniture disease, that phenomenon when your chest slips into your drawers.

Part of the problem with wearing jeans at any age is that lack of fit – because for every pair that cling to Carol Vorderman like a TD to their expenses, there’s a thousand that fit like a rat in an empty sack.

But this is true across the generations – because almost a quarter of the participants in this survey admitted they have yet to find their perfect pair, and another 29 percent gave up the quest completely.

Not surprisingly then, once someone finds themselves the perfect pair, they hang onto them forever . . . or at least for up to five years — and five per cent won’t shop for a new pair for up to ten years.

By which stage there are probably people steering well clear of them in a social setting.

And even though a pair of denims are often a multiple in price of a pair of dress pants, two-thirds of respondents feel it’s still unacceptable to wear them to social events like a night at the theatre or a dinner party.

And just five per cent said they would wear jeans to a job interview – presumably if they plan to work for Levis.

But then again, when did your jeans show you in a positive light? Weren’t they always worn for comfort?

For those who wear suits or even smart casual during the week, jeans denote the weekend. It doesn’t matter than they don’t flatter you; they just mean that you don’t have to go to work.

And if they hang a little loose around the nether regions, isn’t that all the rage these days anyway?

After all, you see teenagers with more of their backsides above the waistline than below – there’s enough room to fit a small kitchen into the crotch.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Connacht Tribune

Always someone waiting to be the new kid in town

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The person who invented the flip phone probably thought that they were made up for life – and they possibly were because they’d have made a lot of money in a short space of time, but if they spent it as though this was a bottomless pit, it might not have been enough to last a lifetime.

We’d come from a time when the cutting edge of communication technology was a mobile device that was literally as big as a brick – so a little fold-away phone that doubled in size when you opened it out, or one of those where the mouthpiece slid from the back of the main phone, made us feel like things would never be the same again.

And then you discover that’s only the start of it; long before the iPhone came along with the whole world stored in the palm of your hand or an Android device allowed you to access all you’d ever need to know at the flick of a thumb, the flip phone was the dog’s proverbials.

But then so too were Amstrad computers, the budget option that made Alan Sugar a very rich man – wealthy enough to buy Tottenham Hotspur and discover that football is a way of leaking cash as quickly as computers might generate it.

Go back through recent history and you’ll find it’s littered with breakthroughs that seemed to take the world to a place that could never be bettered – only to find themselves on the technological scrapheap before the decade was out.

Telex machines, faxes, tape recorders, electronic organisers, camcorders, video players, floppy disks – all developments that looked set to make our world forever only to discover they were just another stepping stone on the way to hi-tech heaven.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Phone zombies add additional degree of difficulty for walkers

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There was a time that students communicated with home about once every blue moon – and only then if they’d ran out of money. There was no real point in writing or phoning home for any other reason.

But now it appears they can’t be out of contact for more than a minute – or at least that’s how it looks if you try to negotiate a way through the hoards of them that stride four-abreast down the street, not one of them looking in the direction their feet are taking them.

They are on their phones, communicating with someone although probably not home – because they give off an intensity and urgency that suggests this messaging couldn’t possibly have waiting until they reached their destination.

Either that or they have become so dependent on Sat Nav that they fear they wouldn’t find their way to college without Google Maps – and so they walk, head down, staring at the screen, oblivious to other pedestrians or even telegraph poles.

And as you dodge around them, you wonder what’s so important that it won’t wait until they’re sitting down somewhere; have they a shares portfolio that has taken a hammering on the morning’s trading?

More likely, they’re watching TikTok or videos on YouTube, while wandering in public spaces like the last of the headless zombies.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Twenty one years after the day the world stood still in horror

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s hard to believe that this week marked 21 years since we were stopped in our tracks at the sight of two planes exploding at full speed into the sides of the Twin Towers – not alone taking down part of New York’s iconic skyline but rocking our world to its core.

We may have missed the first plane, but every one of us can remember exactly where we were as the second plane followed suit, careering through the smoke of the first crash to explode in front of the eyes of the world.

It was so shocking it was difficult to even take in; the first incident might have been a tragedy caused by pilot error or illness – but there was no mistaking the deliberate intent when the same act of terrorism was repeated just 17 minutes later.

And this time the terrorists had the eyes of the world on their act, because we’d tuned into the live pictures of the smoke billowing from the North Tower – to see the hijackers crash UA Flight 175 into floors 75 to 85 of the South Tower, killing everyone on board and hundreds inside the building.

I was working in the Irish Star at the time, where we had one television halfway down the newsroom. With the time difference between Dublin and New York, it was just coming up to 2pm, when the management team met to discuss the news stories for next day’s paper.

It didn’t take a brainstorming session to work out what would fill the paper, and the global news agenda, the next day – except it was already impossible to annunciate just what had happened live on every television station on the planet.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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