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CITY TRIBUNE

Slash attack in Ballybane leaves man in hospital

Francis Farragher

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – Gardaí are investigating the motivation for an attack on a young man in the Ballybane area on Sunday evening last – he suffered ‘slash’ wounds to his neck and upper back.

The incident occurred at Béal Srutha – not far from the Gala Convenience Store – at around 7.40pm on Sunday evening when the victim is understood to have been caught unawares by his assailant. Shortly after, the Gardaí and emergency services were called to the scene.

It is understood that the victim – who is aged around the 30 mark – was rushed by ambulance to University Hospital Galway where he received emergency treatment for cuts to his neck and back. His injuries are not thought to be life threatening.

The injuries suffered by the victim are thought to have been inflicted by a slash hook or machete – his assailant made off on foot. It is thought that only one person may have been involved in the assault.
This is a preview only. To read the rest of this article, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. Buy a digital edition of this week’s paper here, or download the app for Android or iPhone.

CITY TRIBUNE

New Covid-19 assessment clinic at Merlin Park

Enda Cunningham

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The HSE is opening a new assessment clinic at Merlin Park Hospital this week for Covid-19 patients who are showing mild symptoms.

The Community Assessment Hub is for patients who are confirmed Covid-19 positive and who require face-to-face clinical assessment.

Appointments for the seven day service (8am-8pm) are through GP referral only and walk-ins are not permitted.

A HSE spokesperson said the idea behind the hub is to keep mildly symptomatic patients away from the acute hospital system.

“The aim of the hubs is to divert mildly symptomatic patients who require medical assessment away from the acute hospital system by providing a facility in the community where patients can be seen, and clinically assessed by a team of nurses, doctors and physiotherapists,” the spokesperson said.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Redundancies are not on the cards for Galway City Council workers

Dara Bradley

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Redundancies at Galway City Council as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic have been ruled out by Chief Executive Brendan McGrath.

The local authority has imposed a temporary ban on recruitment, but is not planning to lay off any of its 520-strong workforce.

Mr McGrath said that down the road, if this crisis continues for a prolonged period, replacing staff who retire may not be possible. But for now, Council workers are ‘flat out’ maintaining essential services across a range of departments.

“No, we’re not planning that (lay offs). We will endeavour to keep our workforce fully employed. We’ve built up our team since the recession, a lot of our team and the additional bodies we’ve taken on are related to specific projects, for which there was various forms of grant aid available so I think we’d be confident that we will try to be able to retain the entire staff resource,” he said.

Nearly 150 members of staff have been set up to work from home, thanks to the ICT Department at City Hall.

Outdoor staff, and other office staff who must be at City Hall, are observing social distancing guidelines. Offices that used to be packed with people now have one or two workers, spaced in accordance with the guidelines.

As with the private sector, there have been changes to the ‘normal’ working week for Council staff, and some have been redeployed to other areas.

The Council has a statutory obligation to maintain essential services.

“Essential services are anything to do with homelessness; urgent housing repairs like plumbing and electrical; work on houses that were nearly complete to bring back into beneficial use and to bring back into use for self-isolation; public lighting is essential; burst water mains; maintaining traffic lights for road safety; and anything to do with water supply and waste water and treating effluent,” said Mr McGrath.

Street cleaning is classed as ‘necessary but not absolutely essential’, and is a slightly lower category than ‘essential services’.

The rota for street cleaning has been cut back to a number of times a week rather than every day, and this reflects the quieter streets due to people staying at home.

The city’s burial grounds are closed, but graves still need to be opened, and the Planning Department continues to operate.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Cancer patients will have surgeries in private hospitals

Dara Bradley

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Galway Clinic marks its tenth year as a Best Managed company in 2018.

Cancer specialists in Galway are reviewing their patient lists identifying cases that need to be prioritised for urgent surgery and biopsies.

Saolta University Health Care Group, which includes UHG and Merlin Park, has moved to reassure the public that ‘time-sensitive’ cancer cases will get the treatment they need, despite the Covid-19 crisis.

Pat Nash, Chief Clinical Director with the Saolta Group, and consultant cardiologist at UHG, said talks have taken place with Galway Clinic and Bon Secours with a view to cancer surgeries of public patients proceeding at the private hospitals.

“There are many types of cancer, some of which are very time-dependant in that they need intervention very quickly to prevent any bad outcome, whereas others, the immediacy of the time isn’t necessarily going to impact on the long-term outcome.

“I can assure you, that all cases are being reviewed by consultants. Those who need treatment that is time-sensitive, where any delay could impact on outcome, will get treatment.

“Each consultant is reviewing their list and ensuring that any urgent surgery, up until now was accommodated in UHG, but we will be looking to do surgery within Galway Clinic and Bon Secours where we will have capacity and where we can start more or less immediately,” he said.

Meanwhile, cancer patients residing in a residential facility close to UHG while receiving treatment have been relocated to the Harbour Hotel to make way for those battling the Covid-19 pandemic instead.

Cancer Care West offered their 33-bedroom Inis Aoibhinn facility on hospital grounds to University Hospital Galway, which is gearing up capacity to deal with the predicted influx of patients over the coming weeks.

The Harbour Hotel in turn offered its premises free of charge to the charity to accommodate patients from across the region during their treatment.

Richard Flaherty, CEO of Cancer Care West, said staff and 28 residents had relocated to the Harbour Hotel on Monday after the hospital accepted the offer.

It will be used to accommodate staff or patients who need to be isolated close to a medical setting.

“We will continue to provide nursing care and support services onsite at the hotel to our patients.

“We also have arranged transport for the patients to and from treatment as they cannot walk as easily as before to the hospital,” he explained.

“It’s quite a logistical challenge for us, but we knew strategically how important Inis Aoibhinn would be.

“We have to pay for catering and transport but we are particularly grateful to John Lally and his team at the Harbour Hotel for their exceptional generosity for facilitating us at this difficult time.

“As an organisation we are committed to assisting in any way we can the HSE in the fight against Covid-19.”

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