Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

A Different View

Single letter can make one ‘L’ of a difference

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Galway milliners Emily-Jean O’ Byrne, Majella Dalton and Caithriona King (right) with Catwalk model Katie Geoghegan at the launch of the First Furlong at The Ardilaun Hotel, which takes place on Tuesday, July 28,to kickstart the Galway Races. This charity lunch, races and entertainment extravaganza is in aid of Breast Cancer Research.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The press release announced the launch of ‘a new men’s collection with its signature scent’ – which is fine if you know the difference between the definition of expensive scent and stored fodder.

Because those who know their fragrances will know that sillage is the word that describes the degree to which a perfume’s fragrance lingers in the air when worn – as in, “neither scent has a very strong sillage”.

Take out one letter ‘l’ on the other hand and you’re dealing with a very different smell entirely – that of fermented fodder spread across the land, a substance we know as silage.

And while it’s a smell that I strangely enjoy for some reason, I wouldn’t bet on Brown Thomas positioning a sales counter inside the front door to promote Dignified, the new signature scent by House of Silage.

Yet House of Sillage is a self-proclaimed leading name in the world of Haute Parfumerie, based at Newport Beach in California where one presumes there’s very little smell of silage.

Dignified may well do what the promotional material suggests – provoke envy and admiration, a new class of man who cares deeply to distinguish his life and the story behind it.

The scent of silage, on the other hand, is more likely to clear a substantial space around you when you drop into the pub for a pint after a hard day spreading it all over your land.

The additional ‘l’ that separates sillage from silage – not to mention the variation in aroma – should ensure nobody gets one mixed up with the other.

But sometimes you need to be very careful when choosing your brand name – and sometimes you cannot anticipate how time may give your product a very different meaning.

Take the Belgian chocolate company, famous for its pralines since 1923, which decided to change the brand name in 2013.

A year later came the implosion in Iraq – which somehow gave a whole new meaning to newly relaunched Isis Chocolates.

Chocolates for terrorists may be a niche market in some part of the world, but it wouldn’t do anything for your branding in the west – hence another name change to Libeert, the surname of the company owners.

Sometimes it’s just language that lets you down; Poo Poo smoothies may be all the rage in China, but won’t work here – unless they link up with House of Silage perhaps.

Ditto, Pee Cola in Ghana, which actually means very good cola in their language but is unlikely to appeal to the discerning tourist.

‘Barf’ means ‘snow’ in Iran – so Barf detergent didn’t seem like a bad idea; ‘fart’ means ‘lucky’ in Polish, which makes Fart Bar easier to digest. And ‘fart’ means ‘speed’ in Swedish, which is why they didn’t think it a strange name for a car magazine until they saw the tourists laughing at them.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

How will we acclimatise as we ease out of Covid?

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Back in the world before Covid, a mention of Corona either brought to mind a beer or a rock band – but, as we ease our way out of dire straits (another rock band, as luck would have it), we might require a different kind of acclimatisation.

Because what will the evening be like when no more deaths are flashed up as a statistic on the Six-One News?

Who will the world turn to if we have no more Fergal or George or Zara giving out the daily update in a funereal tone?

What will happen to all the people who used to go to the Department of Health press conference at tea-time in the same way the rest of us once headed for the pub?

Like Pavlov’s Dog, we’ve come to expect an evening illness update, taking consolation in it being two less than yesterday or taking fright if it’s two more.

Nobody told us who these poor people were, unless the local paper carried a tribute a week later – for the number crunchers and bean counters and prophets of doom, they were today’s statistics, to be flashed up for a few seconds every night.

And we took these figures as we got them, never questioning if a person died from Covid or with Covid; if they were described as having ‘underlying conditions’, we seemed to accept that as a very broad church.

We listened intently as Fergal or George or Zara told us what the mean age was, breathing a small sigh of relief if it remained a good distance into the future from our own age now.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Home ownership should be a prerogative – not a pipedream

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Half of our 18 to 34-year-olds fear they won’t be able to buy a home in next ten years, according to a new survey. That’s not the shock – it’s the fact that half of them think they actually will.

Because the truth is that owning your own home hasn’t been as much of a pipedream since the days of feudal landlords; indeed many of them will find it a job and a half to even come up with the rent.

And that’s a sign of just how critical our housing crisis has become in the space of a single generation.

We thought that things were bad in the eighties when unemployment levels were way ahead of our pre-Covid figures; when the boat and the plane were the best 0or maybe only – chance for many to secure a job far from home.

But for those who were working, owning a home wasn’t a farfetched concept at all, because there were plenty of starter homes being built and the cost of them still bore some relation to your income.

There was a time before that, when the bank had a simple equation to decide the size of the mortgage they’d give you. It was two and a half times the combined salary for those buying the house – in other words, yours alone if you were a sole purchaser, or double that if it was yourself and your partner.

On top of that, there was no point turning up in the first place unless you had a ten per cent deposit – so it was a straight-forward calculation to find out what you could afford. And house prices, for the most part, kept within that equation.

Of course there were always homes you coveted and couldn’t afford, but you could still buy a roof over your head for a price that only took 20 years to pay back.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Giving it all away can bring you the greatest wealth of all

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It must be the nicest thing that anyone could say about a friend on their passing, and the novelist Jilly Cooper wrote it about the former Sunday Times editor Harold Evans on his death last year.

“Harry died on Thursday at 5am (UK time), his heart perhaps only failing because he gave so much of it away.”

Because when all is said and done, your list of achievements – academic, sporting or stellar career – should pale into insignificance beside the way you treated your family, friends and colleagues.

We too often judge a person’s success or failure by the jobs they’ve held, the money they’ve made, the titles they hold – when the truth is none of that should determine your achievements as a person.

Even billionaires can grow to realise that eventually; just look at Bill and Melinda Gates – although recent events might make this a different picture in the future.

The former Apple golden couple have given close to $50 billion to charitable causes, including the eponymously named Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, since 1994.

In 2019 alone, the couple donated $589 million to charity, making them the seventh most philanthropic people that year. Whether they now give separately or collectively might be the question – but it seems most unlikely that they won’t give at all.

They’re alone in this world of billionaire philanthropists either; Elon Musk, founder of Tesla and one of the richest people in the world, has pledged $100m in prize money for technology that would best capture planet-heating carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

And Jeff Bezos, the Amazon founder who tops the global rich list, has vowed to give out $10bn to worthy climate initiatives.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending