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A Different View

Show some real resolve with New Year promises

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The 54th Infantry Group, made up mainly of troops from Dun Ui Maoliosa in Renmore and led by Lt Col Mary Carroll from Oranmore, pictured serving with the UN in the Golan Heights over the Christmas period.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

New Year, New You – or so they say. But unless you’ve access to your own cosmetic surgeon, the chances are it will be hard to tell the difference between the new one and the current model.

Some of us put pressure on ourselves at the turn of every year to lose weight, ease up on the drink, stop smoking, eat more vegetables, walk to work – in essence all of the things you’ve spent a lifetime avoiding like the plague.

But suddenly the old calendar is heading for the bin and you’re going to face 2017 and make it the year that everything changes forever.

If it lasts until February, you’ve done superbly well – but only if you’ve had the brain to choose just one area of your life to focus on.

Taking on too much is a recipe for disaster – what would make you think that all of the bad habits of a lifetime could somehow be expunged in one fell swoop?

It’s actually fairly easy to make a good start at giving up stuff; the cost of Christmas means you have no money for going anywhere in January anyway, so it’s a question of battening down the hatches until the first salary cheque arrives.

Then your progress can be maintained by the fact that the bills start to arrive towards the end of the month, and the minimum payment on the credit card accounts for the vast bulk of that month’s spare cash.

So you’re heading into February still off the drink – and then you get your head back above water, you meet one of the lads in town on a Friday night….and your resolve is gone the way of the Christmas spirit so that you’re back to square one.

To be honest, I’ve never made a New Year’s Resolution – in fact, never even contemplated one.

Equally, I’ve never quit anything for November and it’s a long time since I last gave up sweets and chocolate for Lent.

The irony is that these days, weeks can go by without a night out and in hindsight I realise that I’ve ‘done’ November on Lent – only in September or October.

But I didn’t actually give up the drink; I just never bothered going out to imbibe.

Researchers at the American University of Scranton found that three-quarters of people managed to keep their New Year’s Resolutions – for the first week.

You can of course go for something more nebulous – best of all is striving for a greater work/life balance because some people can interpret that as no work and loads of life.

Becoming more organised – what does that even imply? Learning something new; if only that resolutions aren’t your thing after all.

Be a better person? Is that an admission that the old you wasn’t up to much – and who’s actually monitoring your progress to a better you?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Problems with calves and other bizarre sports injuries

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

One of the Armenian players to suffer heartbreak against Ireland recently nearly didn’t make it to Lansdowne Road at all because, according to the commentator, he ‘had a problem with a calf’.

And you immediately thought it was one of those romantic sporting stories where the plucky part-timers and massive underdogs have postmen and milkmen and farmers in their ranks.

Then you copped on and realised it was not so much a farm animal that was bothering him as the rear of his leg.

Because the last time a fella missed a match over a problem with an actual calf was probably a Junior B clash on West Clare, a county where they once famously – according to Marty Morrissey anyway – failed to milk a cow for a week after a Munster Football Final win.

We’re all experts on sporting injuries these days – from David Beckham’s broken metatarsal in the run-up to the 2002 World Cup through to Wayne Rooney’s similarly bad break four years later when he suffered a fracture of the fourth Metatarsal as well as one of the Tarsal bones of the foot.

You’d have thought those bones went out with the dinosaurs.

There was a time when a mere broken foot wouldn’t have kept a footballer out of action; think about to the German-born Manchester City goalkeeper of the distant past, Bert Trautmann, who once won the FA Cup after playing most of the game with an actual broken neck.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Always someone waiting to be the new kid in town

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The person who invented the flip phone probably thought that they were made up for life – and they possibly were because they’d have made a lot of money in a short space of time, but if they spent it as though this was a bottomless pit, it might not have been enough to last a lifetime.

We’d come from a time when the cutting edge of communication technology was a mobile device that was literally as big as a brick – so a little fold-away phone that doubled in size when you opened it out, or one of those where the mouthpiece slid from the back of the main phone, made us feel like things would never be the same again.

And then you discover that’s only the start of it; long before the iPhone came along with the whole world stored in the palm of your hand or an Android device allowed you to access all you’d ever need to know at the flick of a thumb, the flip phone was the dog’s proverbials.

But then so too were Amstrad computers, the budget option that made Alan Sugar a very rich man – wealthy enough to buy Tottenham Hotspur and discover that football is a way of leaking cash as quickly as computers might generate it.

Go back through recent history and you’ll find it’s littered with breakthroughs that seemed to take the world to a place that could never be bettered – only to find themselves on the technological scrapheap before the decade was out.

Telex machines, faxes, tape recorders, electronic organisers, camcorders, video players, floppy disks – all developments that looked set to make our world forever only to discover they were just another stepping stone on the way to hi-tech heaven.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Connacht Tribune

Phone zombies add additional degree of difficulty for walkers

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There was a time that students communicated with home about once every blue moon – and only then if they’d ran out of money. There was no real point in writing or phoning home for any other reason.

But now it appears they can’t be out of contact for more than a minute – or at least that’s how it looks if you try to negotiate a way through the hoards of them that stride four-abreast down the street, not one of them looking in the direction their feet are taking them.

They are on their phones, communicating with someone although probably not home – because they give off an intensity and urgency that suggests this messaging couldn’t possibly have waiting until they reached their destination.

Either that or they have become so dependent on Sat Nav that they fear they wouldn’t find their way to college without Google Maps – and so they walk, head down, staring at the screen, oblivious to other pedestrians or even telegraph poles.

And as you dodge around them, you wonder what’s so important that it won’t wait until they’re sitting down somewhere; have they a shares portfolio that has taken a hammering on the morning’s trading?

More likely, they’re watching TikTok or videos on YouTube, while wandering in public spaces like the last of the headless zombies.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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