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CITY TRIBUNE

Shortage of swim coaches a big disability for promising athletes

Stephen Glennon

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Members of Galway Speeders who have been selected to represent Ireland at the IWAS International World Games in Athlone from June 30 to July 6. From left: Mark Henderson (Table Tennis), Caoimhe Folan (Table Tennis), Alicia Winter (Table Tennis), Sinead Keon (Athletics) and Shane Curran (Athletics). Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Talking Sport with Stephen Glennon

Five members of Galway Speeders, the group which promotes sports for children and young adults with a physical disability, will compete in the IWAS (International Wheelchair & Amputee Sports) World Games when they take place in Athlone next week.

Mark Henderson, Caoimhe Folan, Alicia Winter, Sinead Keon and Shane Curran will all be involved in the Games, which run from Saturday, June 30 to Friday, July 6. Their chosen sports are athletics and table tennis.

“There is a team of 20 representing Ireland at the Games,” outlines Galway Speeders Secretary, Delia Boyce, “and out of that 20, five come from Galway City and its surrounds and they are all involved in our club.”

Although Galway Speeders, a multi-sports club founded in 2011 to provide for children and teenagers, participate in an array of activities, these Games only cover a select few such as athletics, table tennis and swimming. “We would have had a team from Galway in the swimming but, unfortunately, we had no coach,” continues Boyce.

Well-known local swim coach, founder of Octopus Swimming Club and volunteer Mary Arrigan-Langan has generously facilitated the club many times, but what the club would love is to put a programme in place for those in Galway Speeders who would love to pursue the sport more vigorously.

“Until recently, we kind of started going once a week with Galway Swimming Club so we are hoping to develop that and get someone who will work with the children. That is all Galway Speeders can do. We need to move on now but, at the moment, we feel we are banging our head against the wall.

“So, we want to get [swim] coaches because we want them [members] in the water morning, noon and night if they choose to go along that path. So, we are pursuing it but it isn’t that easy as you can appreciate,” says Boyce, who notes she has seen the benefits of swimming first-hand through her own daughter and Galway Speeders member, Alicia.

“When she gets into the water, it’s the freedom. It benefits her because she is just coming back from surgery. Listen, they are not all going to be going to the Olympics, it is nothing like that, but you would like to give them the opportunity to be the best they can be.”

While the dearth of swim coaches may be an issue, they do boast of great coaches in the other disciplines. No more so than in table tennis where Rena McCarron Rooney, who represented Ireland at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London and later at the 2014 World Championships in Beijing, is one of the head coaches alongside her husband, Ronan.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

 

 

CITY TRIBUNE

WATCH: The Olivers to the rescue … again!

Enda Cunningham

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Father and son rescue team Patrick and Morgan Oliver were back in action in Salthill this morning, when they helped a swimmer who got into difficulty.

A member of the public raised the alarm at around 10.30am and the Coastguard sought the assistance of Galway Lifeboat who launched from Galway Docks.

Two members of the lifeboat shore crew made their way to the promenade to assist in the rescue.

Patrick and Morgan Oliver were fishing off Salthill at the time and spotted the man taking refuge on Palmers Rock about 200 metres from Salthill shore. They took him on board their fishing boat and brought him back to Galway Docks. Galway Lifeboat in the meantime was stood down. 

The man was taken into the Lifeboat station where he received treatment for symptoms of hypothermia until an ambulance arrived.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Assurances given on progress of road, bridge and bus projects

Francis Farragher

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – It will take time and a lot of money, but the city’s network of major transport projects will proceed on schedule – that was the assurance given this week to councillors by City Council Chief Executive, Brendan McGrath.

Councillors had expressed concerns at their meeting on Monday about the slow rate of progress being made with major capital projects including two new pedestrian bridges over the River Corrib.

However, Brendan McGrath told the meeting that the timelines for the range of capital transport projects – while challenging – were reasonable, pragmatic and achievable.

“All of the projects are moving forward but we must adhere to all the procedures and the different stages that have to be complied with: we have no choice in that,” said Brendan McGrath.

Senior City Council Engineer, Uinsinn Finn, in reply to a number of queries about potential new bus routes, said that while the Council worked closely with Bus Éireann and the bus companies, the local authority didn’t decide on the routes.

Earlier in the meeting, Cllr Peter Keane (FF), asked ‘how it could take 63 months’ to deliver a pedestrian/cycle bridge over the Corrib even though the piers (old Corrib Railway Line) were already in place for the project.

“How can it take over five years to put a bridge like this over the Corrib,” he asked, after hearing that this €11 million Greenways-linked project would not be completed until 2026.

There is a snappier timescale for the Salmon Weir Pedestrian/Cycle Bridge – to be located adjacent to the existing structure on the southern side – with planning consent expected by next Summer and a completion date set for the end of 2022.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Council removes ‘shop local’ signage despite agreement with Latin Quarter

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – Signage promoting a ‘eat, drink and shop local’ campaign, erected by a local business group, was removed by the Galway City Council – despite an understanding that permission had been granted.

The bilingual signage was placed on a number of solar compactor bins and bollard-control boxes in the city centre by the Latin Quarter business group, in an attempt to promote local businesses grappling with the effects of Covid-19.

A source in the group told the Galway City Tribune that the signage cost around €3,500 and that permission to erect it had been given by a ‘senior Council official’.

The signs were put up in mid-October but only lasted around two weeks when City Hall’s Environment Department had them removed, claiming that they had not been consulted.

“There was clearly a breakdown in communications in City Hall because we had permission from a senior official to proceed, and then the Environment Department took issue with the signs and insisted that they had to be removed,” said the source.

A Council spokesperson said they were currently in discussions with the Latin Quarter to provide promotional material and added “there’s been no falling out here”.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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