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A Different View

Selling your soul for thirty pieces of chicken

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Croi Award winners at this year’s Irish Medical Times Healthcare Awards (from left) Croi Dietician Claire Kerins, CEO Neil Johnson and Croi Prevention Nurse Lead Irene Gibson. Croi won the ‘Best Student Project of the Year Award’ for its Restaurant Healthy Menu Labelling project which was written up as part of a post graduate degree undertaken by one of Croi’s cardiac dieticians Claire Kerins. And the charity was runner-up in the ‘Best Public Health Initiative of the Year’ for its Pulse Check and Pulse Awareness Programme which ran throughout the west of Ireland this year.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Given that the league itself once carried the words Kentucky Fried Chicken in its title, nobody should be too surprised to find that there’s a League of Ireland team which plays its home game at a place called Hunky Dory Park.

The irony is that everything is far from Hunky Dory for Drogheda United even if the sponsorship presumably comes in the guise of crisp ten euro notes.

There must be something in the air in that part of the world, because Longford Town are at Flancare Park and Monaghan Town are at Century Homes Park – and the GAA is putting a toe into this water as well.

Cavan sold its soul to a building suppliers and renamed their famous old ground as Kingspan Breffni Park, Mayo added Elvery’s onto the top line of their county ground at McHale Park – and of course the FAI and IRFU dropped Lansdowne Road and all of its history like a hot potato for an insurance pay-out.

But they’re not the only clubs to sell their name for a few pieces of silver – and if anything, when it comes to cashing in our chips (or crisps), we’re well behind the best of them.

Take David Beckham’s old LA Galaxy team, home these days to Robbie Keane, who now play at the StubHub Center – and that’s actually a step up from their old branding of Home Depot Center, which sounded like you could do your DIY shopping during a break in play.

And – not for the first time, when it comes to matters of subtlety or taste – the USA knows no bounds with its stadium branding.

The home ground of FC Dallas is Pizza Hut Park (affectionately known to one and all as the Oven); their MLS rivals, the Colorado Rapids, play at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, and the Phoenix Coyotes ice hockey team hang at the Jobing.com Arena.

The hockey hard men of the Nashville Predators must have been delighted when their venue was renamed the Bridgestone Arena – not that there was anything wrong with the Gaylord Entertainment Center either.

And the rest of the world isn’t behind the door either, if there’s a few bob to be had from a name change – just as long as the income outweighs the embarrassment.

German club FC Nurenberg play at Easy Credit Stadion – and there’s a team in Austria who would clearly sell their soul for cash. At least that’s what calling your team Cashpoint SC Rheindorf Altach and playing at the Cashpoint Arena would suggest.

Closer to home, York City play at KitKat Crescent – if it doesn’t have a bar, that would take the biscuit – and English Unibond League club Witton Albion are at the Bargain Booze Stadium, which presumably eases the pain of heavy home defeats.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Sporting rivalry doesn’t have to mean segregated supporters

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Three sporting teams whose boundaries come up to the back door of each other’s patch were all in action at the one venue – two of them against each other – at the weekend.

If it was the Premiership, it wouldn’t – and couldn’t – have happened because there would be carnage either inside or outside the ground . . .or both.

But this was Pearse Stadium and the county senior football championship, an afternoon’s entertainment that might not have been on Sky Sports’ radar, but which was no less crucial for those with a vested interest all the same.

First up, Oughterard were up against their nearest neighbours Killannin for a semi-final place, while the other leg of this local stool saw reigning champions Moycullen successfully put their crown on the line against Tuam Stars.

It goes without saying that the crowd was in the high hundreds or low thousands; this wasn’t Old Trafford or Anfield with 60,000 or 70,000 fans congregating from all corners of the globe, never mind the country.

So it wasn’t Celtic and Rangers or City against United; it was neighbours and families and friends intermingled all in one place, albeit wearing different colours.

And even allowing for the intensity of local rivalries, the ties that bind are infinitely stronger than the boundaries that divide.

Half the Killannin team went to school in Oughterard. The Monaghans, who line out for Oughterard, are sons of Terence who was steeped in Moycullen football before moving parish.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Homework only goes to prove parents haven’t all the answers

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Anyone fortunate enough to be a parent will always remember the moment when their child transitioned from unqualified hero worship to thinking that ma and da, if not quite clowns, at least possessed feet of clay.

And that moment often coincided with the time you could no longer make head nor tail of their homework.

You were grand with addition and subtraction, even multiplication and basic division – but when theorems or algebra or physics or foreign languages came into the equation, suddenly your infallible status took a nosedive straight into the nearest bin.

The consolation is that we are not alone – because most parents admit they’ve forgotten even the basics from their schooldays, leaving them cruelly exposed when the teenagers come looking for help.

A recent UK survey asked 1,500 parents aged over 30 what they had forgotten from their schooldays.

Top of the list was algebra – forgotten by half of them – followed by trigonometry and Pythagoras’s Theorem. About a third of respondents could no longer remember how to do long division – or name ten or more elements from the periodic table.

A quarter didn’t know the difference between an isosceles and a scalene triangle, and almost a fifth had forgotten how to use a protractor. Most of those probably thought a compass was for pricking the back of the student sitting in front of you.

Other classroom classics now lost in the sands of time included a failure to recognise cloud formations, identifying an oxbow lake, remembering quotes from Shakespeare, or explaining the difference between volts and amps.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Everybody knows a Dave – but it still don’t make a storm

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s been a tough week for Ireland’s Daves and Davids – ever since we found out just how close we were to having our own storm, only to have it snatched away from us by a public vote that inexplicably went for Dudley instead.

It doesn’t matter than Dudley hardly even sounds like a gust of wind, let alone a gale force storm; it just conjures up an image of a drunken Dudley Moore in Arthur, meandering all over the place – more of a danger to himself than the roof of your house is.

The only consolation is that, if it wasn’t Dudley, it still wouldn’t have been Dave – because in compiling the shortlist, our own Queen of the Weather Forecast, Evelyn Cusack, made a stronger case for Storm Diarmuid, ahead of Dave, David and even Dafydd.

The Brits were keen on Storm Dave, but part of the reason that there is an annual debate among the Met Offices is to ensure a disparate selection, with something for each of the participating nationalities.

That’s why we got Barra, Pól, Seán and Méabh, and the Welsh got Arwen and possibly Gladys, and the Dutch got Vergil and Willemien, with a couple of crossover names like Jack and Kim and Ruby in there for good measure.

But when it came to Storm D, our Met Éireann boss wouldn’t even entertain Dermot as a compromise over Diarmuid, according to the correspondence on this year’s storm-naming process, as revealed under Freedom of Information this week.

Ultimately, it didn’t matter in the end because the people decided anyway. They were given a choice of Duncan, Dudley and Dafydd. . .and Dudley was the winner, perhaps – the commentators think – because of Dudley Dursley, erstwhile star of Harry Potter. As opposed to Dudley Moore.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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