Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Lifestyle

Rosy outlook as garden festival grows better by year

Published

on

Daniel Guinnane and Jonathan Gunning clowning aound at Claregalway Castle for the launch of the Galway Garden Festival.

Lifestyle – Judy Murphy meets Eamonn O’Donoghue, castle renovator and garden festival founder

The group of men moving in various directions around the garden of Claregalway Castle exude a sense of purpose– some are sweeping and shovelling, one is carrying a candelabra and another is ferrying tables and chairs into a room off the main tower.

Inside another building, a woman is busy washing floors. She lifts her head in greeting as we enter, then returns to her work.

There’s an air of industry about the place and well there might be as the Castle is getting set to host Galway’s annual Garden Festival, held in aid of the Christian Blind Mission and the Galway Simon Community.

The Festival takes place this weekend and while the main focus is on gardening, this is also a family event with music, theatre performance and revelry for all ages. New events this year include a period-costume competition on Sunday.

The castle’s owner, Eamonn O’Donoghue looks after the entertainment aspect of the Festival, his sister Pádraigín, who lives in Cork and is a keen gardener, is responsible for the green-fingered section of the programme.

A series of talks will take place over the weekend and these kick off at 12.30pm this Saturday with organic gardener, vegetable expert and author, Klaus Laitenberger, who will give an overview of what’s involved in organic gardening. Later, Michael Kelly of the Grow it Yourself gardening movement will share his expertise.

“He is an amazing example of how someone who was a successful businessman reinvented himself as a vegetable gardener and made self-reliance a success story,” says Pádraigín of Michael Kelly.

Also speaking will be London based GP and herbalist Dr Dermot O’Flynn, who will talk on Common Herbs in General Practice.

This year’s Festival is dealing with issues of sustainability and climate change and, on Saturday evening, Met Éireann’s Deputy Head of Forecasting, Evelyn Cusack will speak on this as it relates to the West of Ireland.

While the message might be sombre, Evelyn Cusack is such a powerhouse of energy that there will be a definite high in the area following her talk, says Pádraigín.

Sunday’s speakers include gardener and author Fionnoula Fallon who will mark the year that’s in it by discussing Memorial Gardens of World War I

She will be followed by Oliver Schurmann of Dublin’s Mount Venus Nursery, which has won gold medals at Hampton Court Flower Show and at Bloom.

The talks, which have become a popular aspect of the Festival, are free but the capacity is limited so early booking is advised, says Eamonn.

He and Pádraigín hatched the idea of a Garden Festival a few years ago when Claregalway Castle, which Eamonn had bought as a ruin with the aim of restoring it, was still “a building site”.

The event was to be a fundraising venture for the Christian Blind Mission, a charity that’s not very well known in Ireland but which is close to Eamonn’s heart. This international group works to improve life for people in the developing world who are affected by extreme poverty and disability, whatever form that disability takes.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Published

on

Mayor of Galway, Cllr Michael Smyth, turning the first sod of the new £86,000 community centre at Shantalla on August 6, 1971

1921

Treatment of women

At the meeting of the Galway Board of Guardians on Wednesday, Mr. Pk. Thornton in the chair, a discussion took place regarding the admission of women with illegitimate children.

Mr. Cooke said that it was one of those questions which the Dáil Éireann was trying to solve. The assistant clerk said that Galway was only a small place in comparison to other places.

A member said that these people were coming in month after month, and it was perfectly scandalous.

Mrs. Young said that the practice should be stopped as in England. The assistant clerk said that they had laws of their own in England in regard to this matter. Mrs. Young said that it was a matter that the guardians should go into.

Clerk: So these women assist in washing and scrubbing, Mr. O’Toole?

Master: Yes, they do.

Mrs. Young: Until you tackle the thing, you can never make much headway. The nuns were terrified by some of them who absolutely refused to work.

Mr. Cooke: They should be cleared out.

Chairman: It is not fair for any able-bodied woman to be in the workhouse at the ratepayers’ expense.

The clerk said that this question was one of the most difficult which had confronted Dáil Éireann, and they were looking the matter up.

Profiteering black spot

Galway is the blackest spot in Ireland for profiteering. It is maintaining its inglorious record in extortion – a record that all but killed the race meeting some years ago and diverted the stream of visitors from the town for nearly a decade.

If this flagrant profiteering continues, it will have the result of reducing the city ultimately to poverty, whilst the few grow rich. The economic balance must be maintained. Elsewhere desperate efforts are being made to maintain it.

Prices must come back. Labour in Galway has done absolutely nothing to bring them back, because Labour in Galway appears to be less intelligently led than elsewhere. Yet unemployment is rife amongst us, poverty is already knocking consistently at the door of not a few, wages are falling and must fall.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Overcoming obstacles thrown up by pandemic

Published

on

Founder of Stepping Stones low-cost counselling clinic, Chelsie Daly. Her book is called Covid-19 and Ever Changing Life.

Fashion, beauty and lifestyle with Denise McNamara

Many workers have returned to the office this week for the first time since Covid-19 flattened our population.  Of course there will be those rejoicing at the prospect of getting out of the house, milling with other humans and being able to grab a coffee that’s not from your own kettle.

But no doubt it is a daunting prospect for a sizeable proportion of the workforce.

After so long isolated from friends, family and regular routine, returning to an enclosed space with others who are not obliged to be vaccinated can be frightening.

As psychotherapist Chelsie Daly explains, many of us who never struggled with our mental health continue to experience feelings that are difficult to process.

“I have found that Covid-19 has affected everyone of us. I have noticed an increase in anxiety among my clients due to the ever-changing reality of the past year and a half. It was difficult to adapt to lockdown and once we learned how to do that we are returning to life as it was before, which has also increased anxiety in many of us,” she reflects.

Chelsie, 26, set up a low-cost counselling service in Glenrock Business Park in Galway City called Stepping Stones in 2018. It started as an outlet to share information and meeting peers for coffee and walks. While completing her masters in 2019 it grew into a practice with five therapists, offering sessions costing €40.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Country Living

We should never have doubted Orwell in his ‘1984’ predictions

Published

on

Country Living with Francis Farragher

AS old fogeys go, I am, up to a certain point, reasonably comfortable with the basics (well the ‘very basics’) of technology. I work on a Dell computer, I have an iPhone, I like looking up weather charts on the different sites, but I’m still a little perplexed with the notion that almost every move I make can be watched by someone out there in the ether.

A friend of mine, who changed his phone relatively recently, could show me his movements on a particular day from a couple of years back, and I have always wondered why some advertisements which might be of special interest to me keep appearing on my screen when I’m looking up something.

I also remember being quite ashamed back the years to admitting that I was the owner of a mobile phone. Somehow, it seemed to indicate that I had risen above my station in life, so it was only used on very limited occasions, and hardly at all in public.

That old Fordson Major of a phone that I first owned did though, here and there, have its uses. There was a day down by the river when I needed someone to plug out the electric fence at the home base, and there was just unbounded joy at being able to ring from the waterside, get through, and be able to work away without having to walk back to complete that chore.

In fairness to the old Nokia (or was it a Motorola?), she was quite a trusted friend. On one occasion, it fell from the tractor, split into a number of different pieces, but still worked again when all the bits were put together. It didn’t really matter that in half the places I went to, there was either zero coverage or the feeling that the person at the other end of the line was millions of miles away, which I think has led to a habit that I’ve never quite kicked, namely that of shouting into the phone.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending