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Bradley Bytes

Republican Tom admires Lizzy’s two fingered salute to Europe

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These elderly cousins couldn't slip in for a quiet pint on pension day without Tomas Ó Curraoin (inset) protesting about it.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Republican Sinn Féin Galway County Councillor Tomas Ó Curraoin could hardly ever be accused of being at one with Great Britain.

But when it came to the Brexit referendum, the 32-county Republic man thinks the Brits got it right.

The Barna-based elected representative, who’s not shy when it comes to speaking his mind, told a recent Council meeting that Connemara depends on the N59 for tourism.

During a debate about the upgrade of the road, which is being stalled by red-tape, the bould Tom said the road is in a dangerous state and was a health and safety risk.

Then he started talking like a True Blue Tory about an Irish Brexit.

“If I had my way, we would leave Europe. We never died of hunger before 1972 but at the moment we have no say in the running of our own State. We have to stand up against them,” thundered Tom, who obviously has more in common with the imperialists across the water than he’d like us to think.

Tom was one of the few local politicians who travelled to Dublin and protested the visit of Queen Elizabeth to Ireland five years ago.

But, we suspect if Lovely Lizzy followed in the footsteps of Prince Charles and arrived at NUI Galway next week, he’d be one of the first to congratulate her and her subjects for ‘standing up’ to Europe.

An Bhreatain abú, Tom!

Cathal’s 100-years-old family closet

On the subject of republicanism and monarchy, the 1916 celebrations of the Rising and the Great War have shown how history is never black and white.

The celebrations have thrown-up complex, often uncomfortable, stories about our past.

Sinn Féin Galway City Councillor, Cathal Ó Conchúir’s family links to 100 years ago is a microcosm of the broader dichotomies of republicanism and nationhood and war in society a century ago.

All of his father’s family fought in the War of Independence and were on the Republican side in the Civil War that followed the Easter Rising.

And yet on his mother’s side, his great-grandfather died fighting for ‘king and country’ with the Royal Lancashire Fusiliers in July 1916 at the Battle of the Somme. He is buried at Flanders, and yes – Republican Cathal has visited.

The Civil War split families; so too did the contrasting sides who were pro-1916 Rebels, and those who fought with the British in World War I.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

CITY TRIBUNE

City Council’s contempt for the public it serves

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A City Council picture showing an aerial view of work on the new pedestrian bridge. The local authority has not covered itself in glory when it comes to informing the public about road closures to facilitate the project.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Galway City Council appears to just do what it wants when it wants.

Last Friday, it officially closed a road at Newtownsmyth. It will be closed until October 28.

The closure, which was to commence last Friday, September 23, was to facilitate construction works on the new bridge at Salmon Weir for pedestrians and cycling.

It is essential work and the closure is necessary for health and safety purposes.

The City Council, as is only right and proper, advertised the closure in advance, online and in a free-sheet newspaper. So far, so good.

Except, as anyone who knows Newtownsmyth is aware, that road has been closed for weeks and even months prior to the September 23 official closure start date.

Trying to find the City Council’s closure order, and public notice, for closing the road at Newtownsmyth prior to September 23 has proved as difficult as sourcing the Third secret of Fatima.

Requests to City Hall’s communications department to confirm whether the Council had a legitimate closure order prior to September 23 have not shone any light on the subject.

And so, in the absence of an adequate response, is it reasonable to conclude that the Council did not have permission to close Newtownsmyth prior to September 23?

And if that’s the case, can the Council now just go around closing roads willy-nilly, without notice and without allowing input from residents and users of the road?

Maybe it was a mistake. If it was, why not say so? The Galway public is forgiving. Maybe they had gone through proper procedure, but why not just show us the notice if that’s the case?

For too long now, though, City Councillors have been treated with contempt by the unelected executive at City Hall and the suspicion is this closure without notice was just another manifestation of that contempt spreading to the public too.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Snubs show City Council protocol has gone to pot!

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City Hall failed to inform Cllr Donal Lyons that a Minister and Junior Minister were coming to his Knocknacarra kingdom to turn the sod on a housing development. None of the other councillors were informed about the event or invited to it either.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

City Hall has gone to pot with protocol. It continues to ignore elected representatives of Galway City Council when it comes to issuing invites to events, and is treating lay members of Strategic Policy Committees with disdain, too.

Councillor Donal Lyons (Ind) raised the touchy subject of councillors not receiving invites to ministerial envelope-openings around the city.

The King of Knocknacarra recalled at the latest Council meeting, how City Hall failed to invite local representatives to the turning of the sod on the Salmon Weir pedestrian bridge earlier this year.

That omission, reported in Bradley Bytes, put Councillor Frank Fahy’s nose out of joint and led to a grovelling apology from Chief Executive Brendan McGrath. The head honcho said it would not happen again. It did, though.

At the September meeting last week, Cllr Lyons suggested little had been learned from the experience.

A Minister and Junior Minister had been in Galway recently, to turn the sod on a housing development in his Knocknacarra kingdom and nobody thought to tell him, or the Mayor of Galway, or any other councillor for that matter. “It’s not a gripe,” he said, “but it has happened before.”

Cllr Colette Connolly (Ind) also hit out at the lack of invites and breach of protocol. She said that since Covid, local representatives were not getting “any notifications”.

For it to happen once or twice is a mistake. This is beginning to look like a pattern, though. And it has led many to wonder whether there is an unofficial policy in Galway City Council of treating the elected representatives of the people with disdain, by ignoring long-established protocol regarding invites to events and openings.

Standards are slipping, that’s for sure. But it’s not just elected members feeling left out.

Long-time City Council agitator, Derrick Hambleton of An Taisce revealed at last week’s Cost of Living Coalition Galway meeting in the Western Hotel how a lack of courtesy from City Hall was not confined to elected representatives.

Hambleton, a planning expert who annoys officialdom no end, is a member of the Council’s Planning Strategic Policy Committee.

It was due to meet in the past fortnight but didn’t and nobody informed him and a colleague as to why it didn’t.

“We were supposed to have a meeting last week. We weren’t told it was cancelled; we weren’t even informed. It just didn’t happen. We ask questions, we start rows. It’s a waste of time – I’ve been wasting my time for the last twenty years,” Derrick told the Prospect Hill meeting.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Councillors conspicuously absent from cost of living ‘crisis’ meeting

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

About 60 people attended the Western Hotel on Monday night, for a public meeting about the cost of living and housing crises facing Galway.

Organised by left-leaning lobbyists, Cost of Living Coalition Galway, it lasted about 90-minutes.

Conspicuous by their absence were almost all of Galway’s elected representatives.

Sinn Féin TD in the Galway West constituency, Mairéad Farrell, was a guest speaker and was there for two-thirds of it, before skipping off to another engagement.

But no other Oireachtas representative (TD or Senator) showed up, although Leas-Cheann Comhairle Catherine Connolly (Ind) was listed in literature as supporting the campaign.

According to one of the organisers, Adrian Curran, a local rep for People Before Profit, all of Galway’s TDs were contacted about the event, which was used to rally support for a cost-of-living demonstration in Dublin on Saturday, September 24, three days before the Budget.

None of the 18 Galway City councillors showed up either.

Lorraine Lally, volunteer with Galway branch of Access for All, who chaired the meeting, said she didn’t want to name names.

But she said a number of councillors politely made their excuses – there was a City Council meeting they had to attend from early afternoon on Monday, and some had been working prior to the Council meeting. Another event on top of that would’ve been too taxing, they said.

The Mayor of Galway, Clodagh Higgins (FG) told Lally that she had a prior engagement – honouring the All-Ireland winning Galway Intermediate camogie team with a reception at City Hall.

Curran wasn’t so kind. He told the meeting he contacted all city councillors but only one replied. That was the Green Party’s Niall Murphy who, Curran claimed, had informed him he wouldn’t attend because he didn’t support the coalition’s aims.

In his absence, Murphy missed many insults from the floor, including that the Greens were Thatcherites. Councillor Niall McNelis’ ears must have been burning, too – attendees labelled Labour more right-wing now than the main parties they had coalesced with, Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil, who predictably also got lambasted.

The Cost-of-Living Coalition Galway, which has the support of students’ unions and some trade unions, is planning more events, which councillors cannot ignore forever.

As Farrell and the Socialist Party’s Conor Burke revealed, the group wants communities to replicate the water charges rebellion, and ‘rise up’ to demand action on cutting the cost of living.

(Photo by Joe O’Shaughnessy: Mairéad Farrell (SF) was a guest speaker at a public meeting on the cost-of-living and housing crises, at the Western Hotel on Monday. She was the only Oireachtas member to attend. City councillors, also invited, were absent too. Adrian Curran of People before Profit is beside her).

This is a shortened preview version of this column. For more Bradley Bytes, see the September 16 edition of the Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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