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Publican prosecuted for allowing smoking

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A lit cigarette on a ledge inside a Loughrea bar during a HSE inspection led to the publican being prosecuted and fined for allowing smoking in a specified place on the premises.

Michael Dempsey of Aggie Madden’s Bar, Main Street, Loughrea, and his bar tender, Carmel Guinen, both pleaded not guilty to Section 47 of the Tobacco Act on December 9 last year.

Peter Gaffey, Environmental Health Officer with the HSE, told the Court there was a strong smell of cigarette smoke as he went through the front door of the bar and that he spotted a lit cigarette on a ledge between the pool table area and a stairs leading down to toilets and a rear exit entrance.

Downstairs, there was construction going on and he also noticed a cigarette butt on the floor of the men’s toilet, which also smelled of smoke.

He inspected the premises again on Monday evening, September 30 as part of the protocol before a Court hearing and again he got a strong smell of smoke around the premises.

He said he didn’t document whether there were ‘no smoking’ signage around the premises but equally didn’t document if there had been an absence of the signs on his first visit. However, he did notice signage on his last visit last week.

Another Environmental Health Officer, Chloe Harper, who accompanied Mr Gaffey on his December visit, said she too got a strong tobacco smell on entering the premises.

She said, after the lit cigarette was found, Ms Guinin had asked the four young men playing pool who had been smoking but they didn’t answer left the bar.

Michael Dempsey told the Court that he had run the bar with his wife for the past six years and employed three other people.

He said that he always made sure nobody smoked on his premises and told the Court that he had spent money on providing a steel canopy over the rear exit door seven months ago at a cost of €1,400 where his patrons could smoke.

He further explained that the cause of the tobacco smell on the premises was due to people leaving the front door open while they smoked outside on the street.

But he said that there was some confusion over E-cigarettes and whether it was legal to smoke them on a licensed premises or not.

“I have made every effort I can to provide a smoking area. There would be absolute war if I found anyone smoking on the premises. . .  but I don’t know if the E-cigarettes are legal or not. Some customers tell me it’s legal. I have a zero tolerance to smoking as I don’t smoke myself,” he said.

Carmel Guinen told the Court she was working on her own the night of the HSE inspection and that one of the young fellows playing pool had lit up and she had asked them to cut it out.

She had accompanied the inspectors during their visit and answered their questions.

Judge James Faughnan said he was satisfied that the HSE had made their case and convicted both Dempsey and Guinen. He said there was lots more Dempsey could do to make sure his customers didn’t smoke on the premises.

Pat Carty, defending, said Mr Dempsey was not running a thriving business and to take that into account by giving him more time to pay a fine.

Dempsey, who has a previous conviction for allowing smoking on the premises, was fined €1,000 plus €1,750 costs and has been restricted from selling tobacco for one week starting on November 1.

Guinen was fined €200. Recognisances were fixed for both and he gave them four months to pay.

Connacht Tribune

Security provides the solid foundation for life well lived

Dave O'Connell

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Dave O'Connell

 

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

Money can’t buy you love, according to the Beatles – but it can at least sort out your future security…and it’s that absence of security, in all of its aspects and guises, that lies so firmly at the core of so many people’s stress.

Most obviously, a lack of money means you cannot guarantee a roof over your head – and as a recent EU report on Ireland admitted, this has now become a source of ‘permanent insecurity’ for so many.

The point of the European Social Policy Network report was to lay the blame for this at the feet of successive Irish Governments for over-relying on the private sector to provide housing – therefore leaving those who cannot afford that option in the lurch.

But security, or the lack of it, goes much deeper than having a place to live – even if it still revolves around materialism. Workers, for example, wonder if their job is safe in these uncertain economic times.

And perhaps it’s always been this way – and there have obviously been deeper recessions and massive closures in the past – but that job security that other generations took for granted is now so rarely the reality.

Every parents’ hope for their children was to see them into a permanent and pensionable job; a place to work for life, secure in the knowledge that the odds were stacked in your favour of making it through to the other end.

Nobody talks about that anymore; those seeking employment now would not alone fail to recognise the notion of permanent and pensionable; they would positively recoil from the idea of starting a job today and retiring from the same place in around 40 years’ time.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Luxurious family residence boasts contemporary design and stunning views

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This luxurious A-rated family home in Barna provides the homeowner with a contemporary design emphasising the scintillating views over the hills of Clare and the Burren.

In an enviable location just one kilometre from the village –which offers amenities such as excellent schools, crèche facilities, restaurants, cafes, shopping facilities and The Twelve Hotel – the property at Dreasla is also just a five-minute drive from Salthill Prom.

Spanning 3,700 square feet, this home has been thoughtfully designed for the family, with lots of light-filled space, incredible views and uncompromising finishes with an A-rated energy certification.

Standing on a commanding elevated site of a half-acre, the grounds are professionally landscaped and manicured with magnificent mature trees bordering the site, complementing the uninterrupted views from the family rooms, bedrooms and verandas.

There are three separate south-facing outside terraces/verandas and a large garage.

The architecturally designed accommodation comprises feature entrance foyer, lounge with stunning sea views, playroom/downstairs bedroom, large open plan kitchen/dining/living area, utility and downstairs bathroom.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Shining a light on bygone days at UCG

Judy Murphy

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Historian Jackie Uí Chionna at the NUI Galway Quad. Many former students recalled picking their subjects based on the length of queues for registration. That took place in the Aula Maxima, which is behind her.

Lifestyle – A new oral history of Galway’s university from 1930-1980, with contributions from students and staff from that era, offers a refreshing insight into Ireland’s social and economic history as well as charting the development of UCG from a small university to the institution it has become today. Its author Jackie Uí Chionna tells JUDY MURPHY how it came about.

When Waterford student Bobby Curran entered UCG on a scholarship in 1955, having achieved one of the top five Leaving Cert results in Ireland, he intended taking up medicine.

But his dream came to an end on registration day, following a discussion with the college registrar and secretary, Professor James Mitchell.

Professor Mitchell asked the young Bobby about his background. Bobby explained that his mother, a widow, was a farmer while one of his brothers worked at home and the other was in England.

Professor Mitchell told Bobby there was a problem. If the young man were to qualify as a doctor, he would then have to buy a medical practice. The registrar asked Bobby if his mother could afford that expense and Bobby quickly realised medicine wasn’t an option.

Instead, he studied maths and maths physics and did brilliantly. Bobby graduated in 1958, going on to become Director of Computer Services at UCG.

That story, about how his background dictated Bobby’s choice of course and career, is one of many fascinating memories from former students and employees of UCG included in a new history of the college.

An Oral History of University College Galway, 1930-1980: A University in Living Memory, offers an insight into life in UCG during that a 50-year period. It also shines a light on the broader social and economic landscape of the newly independent Ireland.

Its stories capture the struggles faced by people whose families couldn’t afford to send them to university and the transformation that began in the early 1970s as government’s Free Education scheme began to have an impact. It also details how women began to have greater access to third-level education – among them Budge Clissmann (formerly Elizabeth Mulcahy), who graduated in the 1930s, and quickly learned that women (even those highly qualified in French) were unofficially prohibited from employment in the Department of Foreign Affairs.

An Oral History of University College Galway, 1930-80 is the work of historian Jacki Uí Chionna, who feels “it will add enormously to the understanding of the history of education in Ireland”.

It will and the real pleasure of this book is how accessibly the information is presented.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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