Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Connacht Tribune

Private hyperbaric oxygenation for tissue injury in the West of Ireland

Published

on

SPONSORED CONTENT

Brian Lynch, a Galway based solicitor discloses a conflict of interest: firstly as a solicitor practicing law and secondly as part owner of OxyGeneration, a company providing private hyperbaric oxygenation. This involves breathing oxygen under pressure in a chamber, which has a scientific basis for the known benefits on injured tissue no matter where in the body, especially topical now for the brain for concussion. Nevertheless, Mr. Lynch successfully used 57 daily sessions of hyperbaric oxygenation in Dublin to recover from a horse riding accident in 2015. “The purpose was to tip the balance for a complete recovery in my favour as my recovery was in doubt” said Mr. Lynch.

As a lawyer, he became aware of both the numerous emergency medicine applications in hospitals as well as private clinics for non-emergency uses of hyperbaric oxygenation.  Of legal interest is the circumstantial evidence. The scientific proof uses technology such as before and after blood markers at cellular level, endoscopic videos and SPECT scans as well as clinical measurable assessment as to why this hyperbaric oxygenation works. As a current advocate for OxyGeneration, he says “at the time of my using the treatments, for me it was a case of; if it was good enough for John Magnier’s million dollar bloodstock and good enough for well-known players for sports injuries for rapid recovery, it was definitely good enough for me.”

Nonetheless, as a result, Mr. Lynch was filled with passion to make this vital non-intrusive treatment available, he brought OxyGeneration to Merchants Road in Galway.

Unfortunately for him, he had severe and multiple injuries including traumatic tissue injury, a shattered pelvic fracture, pain, lung tissue injury, nerve ending tissue injury and urology reconstruction surgery (reconnecting tube that takes urine from bladder) that might not work resulting in possible lifelong infection issues. “Nevertheless, my good news story is that I experienced rapid recovery from both severe pain and shortened my time using nappy like incontinence pads. Of great significance however, I more than halved the standard expected time for pelvic fractures in a wheelchair” said Mr. Lynch.

Oxygenation under pressure at an OxyGeneration pressure cabin is key to dissolving greatly increased oxygen in hypoxic (shortage of oxygen) tissue using pressure. After all, the decreased  volume of oxygen makes it possible to reach otherwise unreachable injured tissue. This is what helps to rapidly reduce pain and inflammation. Sitting in the OxyGeneration pressure cabin is like sitting in a small jet aircraft when your ears pop with the pressure. Brian Lynch joked that the experience in a session relaxed him and gave him a half a Gin and Tonic sensation.

Mr Lynch speaking from his background in the legal profession said: “A doctor must take reasonable care to able to give balanced information about all reasonable treatment options. What’s reasonable is determined by a judge stepping into the shoes of a reasonable person in the patient’s position and determining what information would that patient consider significant? The decision maker in healthcare law is the patient. The treatment options must be given prior to a valid informed consent. The key question is: would the patient want to know about oxygenation as a treatment option?  “Of course one would,” says Mr. Lynch.  “A lot of opioid addictive pain medication, anti-inflammatories and blood thinners in heart disease will be superseded by hyperbaric oxygenation if patients are given balanced information. Many current medical procedures and operations such as unnecessary limb amputations or unnecessary intestine surgery or unnecessary urology operations will become redundant when people are given the choice”.

If doctors in a variety of medical specialities in Europe don’t see the big question is: What percentage will become redundant? in this case, they are wrong. One can google about it as just one Tel Aviv University Hospital alone is treating up to two hundred people a day with hyperbaric oxygenation”.

Incidentally, its used for Long COVID for the same scientific reasons of reaching injured tissue which will be discussed as well as other applications in the next six weeks in different articles in the coming weeks.

I drove to Dublin especially for 37 of my daily session when discharged from hospital. From Roscommon to OxyGeneration in Galway would take half that time.

Next week, there will be an article in this paper on why the GAA are likely to be persuaded by management, players, and GPs to make the consultant medical community change Concussion Guidelines to include this type of oxygenation.

Talk to your GP, send this article to a friend in need and google about it. OxyGeneration can be contacted at 091 394444

www.oxygeneration.com

Connacht Tribune

Just the spirit

Published

on

Gareth and Michelle McAllister pictured at the old mill in Ahascragh where the new whiskey and gin distillery will be estabished. Photos: Gerry Stronge.

A former grain mill in the village of Ahascragh is being converted into a distillery thanks to Gareth and Michelle McAllister who have big plans to meet growing demand for craft Irish whiskey and gin in the Far East as well as closer to home. They are also developing a visitor centre in the distillery and are currently offering people a chance to invest in their company as DECLAN TIERNEY learns.

A product that will be developed in the East Galway village of Ahascragh will find its way Asia and various other parts of the world following a courageous initiative by a couple who aim to become huge names in the distillery industry.

Given their thirst for the distilling of craft whiskey and gin, Dublin couple Gareth and Michelle McAllister are set to put the tiny village on the international map by transforming an old corn mill into a major employer as well as a tourist attraction as part of a €10 million investment.

Works have already started on giving the old mill, previously an ivy-clad eyesore in the village, a brand-new look and the couple hope to go into full production by the end of next year – ready for the 2022 Christmas market.

Employment has already commenced in the marketing and administration end of the distillery and when it’s in full production, Gareth and Michelle will create around 40 new jobs in the village.

They will be producing two whiskey products and one gin when they’re at full capacity but already they are bottling a single malt under their own product name. This is currently on the market . . . and is proving particularly popular, despite limited availability at the moment.

The distillery is a labour of love for Gareth, a chemical engineer by profession, and Michelle who worked as a psychologist but is now operating the café in Ahascragh that they opened earlier this year to coincide with the launch of the distillery.

Both worked in China for seven years in different roles and while there, they discovered that there was a big demand for Irish-made spirits. They are now determined to explore this particular niche in the market as well as developing outlets across Europe and in the market here at home.

“This has been foremost in our plans and aspirations for some considerable time,” explained Gareth. “Since our time in Asia and Singapore we discovered that Irish spirits were a much sought-after product. As part of my training as a chemical engineer, distilling formed part of this.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Fascinating final in store but St Thomas’ hold most of the aces

Published

on

Salthill/Knocknacarra's Niall McGauran on the attack against Luke Murray of Dunmore MacHales during Saturday's County U19 football A final at Tuam Stadium. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Inside Track with John McIntyre

ST Thomas’ will be attempting to achieve what has proven beyond three great Galway club hurling teams over the past 30 years when targeting a four-in-a-row of senior titles at Pearse Stadium on Sunday. During their respective periods of dominance Sarsfields, Athenry and Portumna were nearly untouchable on their best days, but winning four consecutive county senior hurling championships proved a bridge too far for each of these former powers.

Athenry went the closest of them all. Heading to Duggan Park in October 2001 – the last senior final to be played in Ballinasloe – Pat Nally’s troops stood 60 minutes away from claiming a fourth title on the trot. The red-hot favourites came mightily close too, only losing by a point (0-18 to 2-11) to a Clarinbridge outfit winning their first ever title.

Portumna pulled off the title hat-trick in 2009, but didn’t make it back to the following year’s final, and while Sarsfields – under Michael Conneely – triumphed in 1992, ’93 and ’95, they came unstuck in the 1994 decider when falling to Athenry (2-6 to 0-9). These three clubs were outstanding ambassadors for Galway club hurling, but there was no four-in-a row for any of them.

It underlines how difficult the achievement is and we must go back to the Turloughmore team of the sixties for a club to enjoy such an extended stranglehold on the county championship. They ended up winning six titles on the trot, but have only won the one since – in 1985 when overcoming Killimordaly (1-14 to 1-4) at Pearse Stadium.

Given that St Thomas’ are only one hour away from a fourth consecutive title, it’s curious that they are not yet held in the same awe as Sarsfields, Athenry or Portumna when they were at the peak of their powers. Perhaps, their lone All-Ireland club success up to now may have some influence in this regard.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Students see red over in-person exams

Published

on

NUIG.

NUI Galway has moved this week to deny accusations that it is ‘playing Russian Roulette’ with students’ wellbeing by proceeding with in-person exams.

The Students’ Union blasted the university for its decision to forge ahead with examinations in exam halls amid sky-rocketing Covid-19 cases.

President of the SU, Róisín Nic Lochlainn, slammed college authorities for what she described as a ‘reckless attitude to students’ health and wellbeing’.

“The stubborn refusal by university management is playing Russian Roulette with the health of students and their families.

“We are talking about forcing people to attend multiple spreader-events right before they go home to their families for Christmas. This is reckless and irresponsible from university management, particularly when there is a tried and trusted alternative available,” said the student leader.

In-person exams for the vast majority of students were cancelled last year as the university remained closed throughout the most stringent Covid-19 restrictions.

However, students have been back attending lectures since September and NUIG plans to proceed with normal exams for the first time since Summer 2019 – albeit with a number of risk mitigating measures in place.

The Connacht Tribune has learned that following applications by in excess of 500 students for ‘reasonable accommodation’ – where certified conditions that increase the risk of adverse reaction to Covid infection – there will be 1,600 instances where exams will be sat in individual rooms.

It is understood that there are 16 exam venues this year – a much greater number than in previous years – and that additional cleaning measures including ‘air fogging’ will be carried out to sanitise large venues.

Read the full story in this week’s Connacht Tribune, on sale in shops now – or you can download the digital edition from www.connachttribune.ie

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending