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CITY TRIBUNE

Plans drawn up for apartments at 1780 property

Enda Cunningham

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Plans for the refurbishment of the derelict Rahoon House – which dates back to the 18th century – to make way for four apartments have been lodged with Galway City Council.

Roger Fahey has sought permission for the four 2-bed apartments and four parking spaces at the site, which has been deteriorating since the 1990s.

The plans involve the refurbishment, renovation, minor internal alterations and two-storey side extensions to the property at Ros Geal.

According to a conservation report submitted with the planning application, the building has been neglected.

“The building is in an advanced state of dereliction with prolonged exposures to water ingress and weather, along with previous neglect and vandalism. The planning files show repeated applications but little or no development works appear to have taken place over a period in excess of thirteen years,” the report reads, adding that the property dates back to around 1780.

“From an overall plan of works, the proposal is to add extensions to enable the restoration and reuse of the premises to achieve two apartments on each of the ground and first floors, so as to finance the restoration and generate a sustainable use for the future of the premises.

“The full details of each intervention cannot readily be analysed because of the limited access and unsafe nature of the premises currently. The advanced nature of the decay of organic material will mean that very little can be fully retained.

“Despite the advanced decay and dereliction due to neglect, vandalism and prolonged exposure to water ingress and the elements, a successful restoration project with conservation of the structure, where possible, should be successful because of the available records and the remaining sections of original fabric,” the conservation report reads.

Dúchas, the Heritage Service, inspected Rahoon House in June 2000 and wrote to the then owners, the Kenny Group, outlining emergency repair work and security measures which it asked to carried out.

Kennys were granted permission in 1998 for the redevelopment of the property to make way for four apartments – at the time, residents in the Ros Geal estate complained of all-night cider parties, smashing glass and drunken antics.

Roger Fahey is listed as the new owner of the building, which was bought at auction in June for €135,000. The Advised Minimum Value was €80,000.

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CITY TRIBUNE

€46,000 Lotto winner comes forward as deadline looms

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Galway Bay fm newsroom – The Knocknacarra winner of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus from the 12th of December has come forward to claim their prize, just two weeks before the claim deadline.

The winning ticket, which is worth €46,234, was sold at Clybaun Stores on the Clybaun Road on the day of the draw, one of two winners of the Lotto Match 5 + Bonus prize of €92,000.

A spokesperson for the National Lottery say we are now making arrangements for the lucky winner to make their claim in the coming days.

Meanwhile, the Lotto jackpot for tomorrow night (27th February) will roll to an estimated €5.5 million.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Voice of ‘Big O’ reflects on four decades

Denise McNamara

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The daytime voice of Big O Taxis is celebrating four decades in the role – and she has no plans to hang up her headset any time soon.

Roisin Freeney decided to seek a job after staying at home to mind her three children for over a decade. It was 1981 when she saw an advert in the Connacht Sentinel for a dispatch operator.

The native of Derry recalls that the queue for the job wound its way past Monroe’s Tavern from the taxi office on Dominick Street.

“There was a great shortage of work back then. I nearly had a heart attack when I saw the line of people. My then husband who was giving me a lift in never thought I’d get the job, he was driving on past and I said, let me off.

“I got it because I worked as a telephonist in the telephone exchange in Derry. But I was terrified starting off because I hadn’t been in the work system for so long.”

Back then Big O Taxis had only 25 drivers and just a single line for the public to book a cab.

“We had an old two-way radio, you had to speak to the driver and everybody could listen in. It was easy to leave the button pressed when it shouldn’t be pressed. People heard things they shouldn’t have – that’s for sure,” laughs Roisin.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of Róisín’s story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Baby boom puts strain on Galway City secondary schools

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A baby boom in the late 2000s has left parents of sixth class pupils in Galway City scrambling to find a secondary school place for their children next September – with over 100 children currently facing the prospect of rejection from city schools.

The Department of Education is now rushing to address the issue and confirmed to the Galway City Tribune this week that it was fully aware of increasing pressure and demand on city schools

Local councillor Martina O’Connor said there were 100 more children more than there were secondary school places for next year, and warned that this would put severe pressure on schools to increase their intake numbers.

“This will put a lot of pressure on schools because they will have been working out the number of teachers and what resources they would need in October or November last year and they could be facing a situation where they will be asked to take an additional eight or 10 students.

“There would normally be a small excess – maybe two or three – but this year, it’s over 100. There is a bigger number of children in sixth class this year and there will be the same issue for the next few years,” said the Green Party councillor.

A Department spokesperson said while there were capacity issues, factors other than numbers could be at play, adding that there were approximately 1,245 children in the city due to move onto secondary school in September.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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