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One in seven commercial premises empty in Galway

Enda Cunningham

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Stark figures were released this week which show that one in every seven commercial premises in Galway were lying empty at the end of 2014.

And Connacht has the three counties with the three highest commercial vacancy rates in the country – Sligo, Leitrim and Galway.

A new report shows that of the 12,817 commercial addresses recorded in Galway last year, a startling 1,950 (15.2%) were empty.

That is the third highest level for the entire country after Sligo at 16.5% and Leitrim at 15.5%.

According to the report from GeoDirectory and DKM Economic Consultants, the total number of commercial addresses in the country was 223,107.

The report uses an address point as a unit, as opposed to a building, which can comprise one or more units.  In Sligo, there were 627 vacant units at the end of 2014, while in Leitrim, there were 311.

Dublin (22% or 49,161 address points) had the highest number of unique commercial address points, followed by Cork (11.6% or 25,882) and Galway (5.7%). Leitrim, Longford and Carlow had the lowest number of commercial address points, each with less than 3,000 units.

Dara Keogh, CEO of GeoDirectory said “We have observed similar trends during 2013 and 2014, forming at a county and regional level, which is providing us with an overview of the picture from a national perspective. Average commercial vacancy rates are increasing. However the rate of increase of vacancy is slowing.”

The GeoDirectory figures are recorded by 5,600 An Post delivery staff working with experts from Ordnance Survey Ireland. The database is used by many different companies and organisations across a diverse range of applications.  The emergency services use it for route optimisation when responding to 999 calls, which can save valuable minutes in an emergency, while it is also used by the likes of the Central Statistics Office, the Property Registration Authority, Bord Gais, 11890 directory enquiries, banks, property websites and pizza delivery companies.

CITY TRIBUNE

Work set to start next year on €60m student accommodation scheme

Dara Bradley

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More than 600 new student bed spaces will come on stream at NUIG in time for the start of the semester in September 2022 – bringing welcome relief to the high demand in the student housing market.

The university this week invited tenders for the design and construction contract to develop a new apartment complex at Corrib Village, the existing student accommodation village.

The estimated value of the contract is €60 million, excluding VAT, and its duration is for 38 months.

The plan is to develop a “commercially viable, modern, appealing and environmentally friendly student accommodation on campus”.

According to the tenders, it will be delivered on a phased basis.

The first phase requires immediate fit-out on July 1, 2021 for the start of the term that September. The second phase will be required for immediate fit-out on the June 1, 2022 to allow for adequate setup in advance of the new semester in September 2022.

The greenfield site for the development is north of the existing Corrib Village, between the Bioscience Research Building and the Park and Ride facility.

It will have 674 bed spaces in 125 apartments, in clusters of four to six en suite bedrooms with a communal living area in each apartment.

There will also be more communal areas, and facilities, service rooms, refuse storage and covered cycling storage facilities. It will be built in four blocks, with one block ranging from four to eight storeys tall, two blocks six storeys tall, and the remaining block four storeys.

The plan is for the development of courtyards, pedestrian access, vehicular access and drop-off and parking facilities for the less mobile. Vehicular access is through the existing Corrib Village access road.

The deadline for submission of interest in the tender is November 1, with a contractor to be appointed in the new year.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council records high rate of planning appeals

Enda Cunningham

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Galway City Council had one of the highest rates of appealed planning decisions in the country last year, according to a new report from An Bord Pleanála.

According to the Board’s Annual Report for 2018, there were 378 planning decisions made last year by the City Council.

Of these, 42 were appealed (11.1%), which was the fourth-highest rate of challenged decisions in the country.

The highest rate was in the Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council area with 15.9% of decisions appealed; Dublin City Council at 15.4% and Cork City Council at 12.6%.

The report also shows that in Galway City, there were 37 decisions made by the Board last year – 12 Council decisions were upheld, 16 had planning conditions varied and nine were overturned.

The 42 appeals lodged represented 2.7% of all appeals nationally.

Meanwhile, more than one third of rulings by An Bord Pleanala last year on appeals in County Galway resulted in the Council’s decision being overturned.

The Board’s report shows that 21 decisions from the County Council were overturned.

In 2018, the County Council made 1,626 planning decisions – 81 of these were appealed (5%), which equated to 4% of all local authority planning decisions nationally which were appealed.

Decisions were reached on 60 cases (there may have been a carry-over of decisions pending from 2017, and some from 2018 may not have been made until this year).

A breakdown of the decided cases shows that 14 had the local authority decisions upheld; 25 had decisions varied and 21 had decisions overturned.

According to the Board, appeals were dealt with in an average of 19.5 weeks last year, down from 23.3 weeks recorded in 2017. The Board has an objective of deciding appeals within 18 weeks.

Nationally, there were 28,785 planning decisions, of which 2,028 were appealed (a rate of 7%). A total of 1,806 decisions were reached, of which 434 were upheld, 957 had conditions varied and 415 overturned.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Bus pervert facing jail term

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Athlone Courthouse: Galwayman facing jail for offensive sexual behaviour on a bus.

A 52-year-old man who asked a female passenger on a bus to perform a sex act on him, and then proceeded to masturbate during the journey, has been told he may face a prison sentence.

Eamon McCoy of 20 Beachmount Road, Highfield Park, appeared before Athlone District Court.

BY ADRIAN CUSACK

He entered a guilty plea to a charge of intentionally engaging in offensive conduct of a sexual nature during a bus journey on the M6 at Ardagowna, Athlone, on February 15 last.

Outlining the details of the incident, Sergeant Paul McNally said Gardai received a complaint from a woman at 2.15pm on that date. She told them that she was on a bus heading towards Galway when a male passenger asked her to perform oral sex. He then proceeded to masturbate under his clothing.

The woman took a photo of the man, McCoy, on her phone and contacted the Gardai.

Solicitor Dara Hayden, representing McCoy, said his client was “reluctantly” entering a guilty plea to the charge, as “he tells me that he doesn’t recall the incident” and was “appalled” by the details that were outlined. He said the defendant had bipolar disorder and was on a lot of medication at the time of the offence.

McCoy, who wore a sports headband and dark glasses during the hearing, had worked as a nurse’s aide in an old folks’ home up until 15 or 20 years ago, but he had not worked since then and was on disability benefit, his solicitor said.

Judge Seamus Hughes asked McCoy why he had been travelling on the bus on the date of the incident, and he replied that he was heading back to Galway from Dublin airport.

The judge asked him why he had been in the airport, and whether he had been returning from a trip overseas, but McCoy said he hadn’t.

“I go up [to the airport] from time to time . . . I just went up there for the day,” he said.

Judge Hughes said that, as a first step, he wanted to see McCoy come up with “€2,000, payable in cash, for the girl.”

Mr Hayden replied that his client would find it very difficult to come up with that sum of money, and he was willing to engage in preventative measures to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

“Don’t tempt me to say it,” replied the judge. “I know in some countries what the preventative measure would be.”

The judge said he regarded McCoy as “a very creepy type of character” who had said something “extremely vulgar” to the female passenger.

“All of the signs point to this having been caused by a mental health issue,” replied Mr Hayden, but the judge said this was pure speculation on the solicitor’s part.

Mr Hayden asked for some time to come up with a medical report on his client, and Judge Hughes agreed to adjourn the case for two months.

The judge said he wanted to see a medical explanation for how any mental illness McCoy might have would have caused him to behave the way he did on the bus.

He also said he wanted assurances that the defendant wouldn’t do this “creepy, filthy, dirty, rotten thing again.”

Adjourning the case to December 11 next, Judge Hughes said he would deal with the issues of compensation and custodial sentence length on that date.

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