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NUIG proposes to build new 400-bed student village

Denise McNamara

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An application to build units accommodating over 400 students has been lodged with the city planners by NUI Galway after original designs were altered following consultation with local residents.

The development rising to five storeys in height adjacent to the Corrib Village student complex is planned for a site behind seven properties along Newcastle Road Upper.

The development involves 429 bedspaces, arranged in 57 units of six en-suite bedrooms, 11 units of five en-suite bedrooms and eight units of 4 en-suite bedrooms, with communal living areas in each. The development will be in one five-storey block and three 3 and 4 storey blocks.

Further communal areas and facilities are part of the design.

Of the houses nearest to the development, four are residential, with one used as a doctor’s surgery, one a crèche and the other a facility operated by the Health Service Executive (HSE).

Of the four still being lived in, one was recently built by the University to accommodate a family who sold their house to the institution to build a new entrance opposite the G&L Centra along Upper Newcastle Road.

The plans were lodged on Monday after they were revised following discussions with residents and local councillors. In its information booklet, NUIG explained there was a significant shortage of student bed spaces – there are currently 2,700 purpose-built beds available to meet a core demand from 9,500 students.

Councillor Billy Cameron said the project raised the alarm bells of residents due to its scale, proximity to homes and antisocial behaviour that may arise once students moved in.

“I must say in my 11 years as a councillor and having worked with various residents’ associations in the area and meeting with NUIG authorities, the local community Garda, and students’ union, we never came across a problem of antisocial behaviour emanating from Corrib Village so when they voiced concerns about antisocial behaviour I can’t agree with that. It’s a very well run complex with high security,” remarked Cllr Cameron.

“The issue of antisocial behaviour in privately-rented houses has diminished incredibly over the last few years due to liaising with the Community Garda, residents’ association and the students’ union. We had only one occasion last year of antisocial behaviour and that was during the unofficial Rag Week.”

The revised plans have reduced the height of the blocks closest to the private back gardens to three storeys at the closest point to the boundary, stepping up to four and five storeys towards the river.

The architects have also moved the three storey blocks a further three metres from the boundary with the neighbouring properties, leaving the three storey blocks now within 11 metres of the boundary, stepping up to four storeys at 21 metres from the boundary, and the five storey blocks at 71 metres from the boundary.

Vehicular access to the development will be via the existing Corrib Village access road and like that development, it is proposed to make it available for short-term visitor letting during the summer months.

There continues to be some concerns among residents in neighbouring estates about the impact of parking.

“I will be looking for further clarification about whether the under-utilised car park further north of Corrib Village can be used for parking by the development, perhaps for a small supplementary payment. This would alleviate the worries of residents in Greenfields and Fairlands as it has 400 spaces,” explained Cllr Cameron.

While he was originally unimpressed with the fascade of the building – believing it to be “a bit Soviet in style” – further enlarged slides have shown it was “not as harsh”.

“People recognise there’s a shortage of accommodation, not just for students but for the general public because there’s been no building for seven years. So something has to happen to free up accommodation,” the Labour councillor remarked.

Residents now have several weeks to lodge submissions in relation to the application. A decision is due to be made by the planners to accept or reject the proposal by October.

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway troop keeps the flag flying for scouting!

Stephen Corrigan

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Cubs from 14th Galway, Michael O’Gorman (10), Ziggy Touhy (10), Lily Lawless Casby (10), Sam Mangan (11), Mathew Kelly (12), Kyra O’Gorman (11) and Harry Fahy (10), making Smores on the campfire in Shantalla at their first outdoor meeting since restrictions have lifted.

“I have a child again.” That was the response of one parent to Chairman of the 14th Galway Scouts, Brendan O’Gorman, after their son returned from an outdoor adventure with the group last summer.

It was that response for Brendan that epitomised the impact lockdown was having on children – and the importance of the outdoors to restoring their wellbeing.

The 14th Galway group, which has boys and girls of all ages up to 18 involved, has become synonymous with the outdoors for that reason, as Brendan explains.

“In the first lockdown last spring, we’d been doing as much as we could online. That was more so to keep the teenagers connected, but it doesn’t work for the younger ones. It’s really just not the same.

“Then, in the summer, when restrictions eased a bit, we got them all outdoors. We were able to bring our older groups on 10-day outdoor experiences and what we were noticing was they were exhausted after the first day of activities,” says Brendan.

As the days went on, he describes it as being like ‘a weight was lifted off their shoulders’.

“They seemed to find the whole living within so many rules very tiring. After the 10 days, they were running around like normal kids. Our normal experience is that they’re full of enthusiasm at the beginning and calm down as it goes on – but this flipped it on its head,” says Brendan.

As a result of Covid restrictions, a decision was taken by the group to focus its energy on the outdoors – investing in tents and returning to what the Scouts has always been about like camping, hiking and outdoor survival skills, he continues.

“By us being active last year, we have seen our numbers grow by 27%. We have had a queue of children and adults wanting to get involved. As time went on, the message was getting stronger that we were safe out in the parks.”

The children and teenagers already involved were going back to their friends, spreading the word and spurring more and more to join.

There was a noticeable improvement in the children’s sociability as the summer went on, says Brendan a welcome sight for parents and volunteers who had seen children go into their shell as they tried to cope with months trapped indoors.

“We operated all through the summer and as the evenings drew in from October, we started meeting on Sunday afternoons rather than weekday evenings. We would have kept going right through January and February, but for the restrictions that came in at Christmas.

Making their return as the latest batch of restrictions eased, small groups were able to meet at Shantalla Park where Brendan says they will continue to meet over the coming weeks and months.

“Last year, we only got to do away trips for the older groups, but this year we have plans for camps in July for all age groups. We’re staying a bit closer to home than we might normally, because there are a lot of new members who mightn’t be as comfortable to be away from home.

“We expect to expand further in September. It’s only week two back and we already have people contacting us wanting to join,” says Brendan.

The Scouts as an organisation has been hit, like many others, by Covid – losing volunteers who have had to step out because of health risks has been a particular challenge, says Brendan.

But 14th Galway has bucked the trend with growing numbers.

“The national organisation has a campaign going to increase awareness of what Scouts is about. In Galway, we have ourselves on the west side of the city, the 13th in Renmore and the Sea Scouts and as we’ve seen, it can be such an important outlet for young people,” says Brendan.

For more information on joining Galway 14th Scouts, visit 14thgalway.ie, or for other groups see scouts.ie.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council asked to change speed sign mistakes

Dara Bradley

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Kevin Jennings with his son Kenny and daughter Ada at one of the incorrect speed signs on the Ballymoneen Road in Knocknacarra. PHOTO: JOE O'SHAUGHNESSY.

Officials in the Transport Department at City Hall have again been asked to replace incorrect speed limit signs on city roads.

Councillor Martina O’Connor (Green) has submitted a Notice of Motion for this week’s meeting of Galway City Council calling for wrong speed signs to be replaced.

Cycling campaigners have also reiterated their plea for correct signs to be put in place – to protect all road users.

It emerged last month that several roads within the city boundary that have speed limits of 50km/h, have speed signs on them suggesting they are in 80km/h zones.

Among the roads with incorrect 80km/h signs are: Upper Cappagh Road, Upper Ballymoneen Road, Rahoon Road, Letteragh Road, Rosshill Road, Dublin Road and the Oranmore Coast Road.

According to Galway Cycling Campaign, the incorrect signage has been on the roads for up to 12 years.

The Council has acknowledged the problem and signalled it will carry out an audit to identify how many signs are wrong.

Cllr O’Connor’s motion reads: “I request Galway City Council Transport Department replace incorrect speed limit signage. This was to be carried out with current rejected bylaws but now needs correction on its own merit for safety particularly of pedestrians and cyclists.”

The Council did not answer a series of specific questions put to it by this newspaper. Instead, it issued a statement on the matter, in which it indicated the incorrect signs would not be corrected until a review of speed bylaws is completed.

The Council said: “In the last two years, Galway City Council undertook (in accordance with national guidance) a review of speed limit bylaws.

“Following extensive public consultation these draft bylaws were presented to the elected members of Galway City Council in September 2020. These proposed Bylaws had included a reduction in the city centre area of speed limits to 30km/h and some increases in limits on outer major roads.

“The proposed bylaws were rejected by the elected members. The Transport Strategic Policy Committee of Galway City Council has charged staff in the Transport Department with the task of further reviewing these draft bylaws. When completed there will follow an audit and review of signage across the city.”

Chair of Galway Cycling Campaign, Kevin Jennings, said that the Council was trying to shift the blame to councillors, when it was the executive that has the powers to change the signs to the correct speeds.

Mr Jennings said: “The issue of the speed limits review in autumn 2020 has nothing to do with the issue of the current incorrect signage on our roads. The Council’s statement blamed our councillors. The councillors are not responsible for the erection and maintenance of road signage; the Council is.

“The default limit in the entire Galway City administrative region, a built-up area, is 50km/h unless a special speed limit bylaw applies.

“Signs on at least seven roads say the speed limit is 80km/h. This is erroneous signage. The Council is responsible for the speed limit signs.”

Cllr O’Connor’s motion piles pressure on the Council to rectify the incorrect signs, and it is on the agenda for today’s (Monday) meeting.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Rice cookers removed from Direct Provision Centre rooms

Dara Bradley

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An official inspection of the Direct Provision centre in Salthill found cooking appliances in several bedrooms of the accommodation for asylum seekers.

The annual inspection of the Eglinton in Salthill, by the International Protection Procurement Services, on behalf of the State, highlighted some issues for Maplestar Ltd, the operator of the accommodation, to resolve.

The inspection took place in November 2020, and the report was released by the Department of Justice to Galway City Tribune last week.

The hotel can accommodate 210 at capacity; on the day of the inspection there were 143 people living there, including families and single women.

No visitors were allowed at the centre during Covid-19, according to the report.

Meals are provided at the centre, but the report highlighted that a number of residents used their own cooking facilities in their bedrooms, which was against house rules.

During the inspection rice cookers were found in five bedrooms. In a letter of response to the inspector, management at the Eglinton outlined that it had rectified a number of issues, including removing rice cookers from bedrooms.

One resident “was informed of the dangers of cooking in the room and cooker was removed by management”, according to the response.

The report notes that meals prepared by a chef employed by the centre are served three times a day. Lunches for schoolchildren are also provided and there is access to snacks outside of the centre’s breakfast, lunch and dinner hours.

Some other mostly cosmetic issues in relation to rooms were mentioned by the inspector, and were subsequently dealt with, according to management.

A previous annual inspection report in 2019 had also highlighted that cooking facilities were being used in some of the bedrooms in the hotel.

“I can understand that even if you did have communal cooking facilities why you would be tempted to use other things in your own space. It’s very sad. I actually get shivers even thinking about it because people can be in Direct Provision for long periods of time,” said Galway-based senator, Pauline O’Reilly.

“Particularly for families, but also for single people, you have to have some element of privacy. When you look at human rights, people do have an entitlement. So even in the best-case scenario in these communal settings with a communal kitchen that’s not what families should have to survive. It could be a case that you’re not getting on with other people, all kinds of social issues arise when you’re living with people for a long period of time.”

She said that abolishing Direct Provision was a top priority of the Green Party in Government, and had brought forward a white paper on it. She wants “own-door accommodation”

“The timeline to get this done over the lifetime of the Government will be a challenge. Obviously, that’s the commitment and that’s one of the key things for us,” said Senator O’Reilly.

“We have to be careful in any conversation around this not to be pitting people against each other. I don’t think that is the reality. Actually, the numbers in Direct Provision are relatively low in the overall population. And so, it should be achievable [to end DP] in terms of housing.

“The whole purpose of the plan is that people who can afford to pay, will pay for their housing. It’s not a case of everybody gets something for free. It’s a case-by-case basis just like it is with anyone else in the population.

“Whether you pay or not will depend on your means. You could be coming from areas of conflict where people have very high skill levels but they’re fleeing conflict or disaster zones,” she added.

The Department of Justice confirmed that phasing out of Direct Provision had commenced.

“Emergency accommodation is being phased out. This accommodation is not suitable for long-term use, and comes with a high degree of congregation. Single people who do not know each other can end up sharing rooms. Good progress has been made in terms of closing emergency accommodation this year and moving residents into accommodation with better standards,” it said.

The Department also pointed to a number of other short-term improvements.

Asylum seekers can now open Irish bank accounts, which was not the case up until this year.

A spokesperson said that secondary school students living in DP no longer have to pay international fees when applying for post-leaving cert and third level courses; they pay the same rates as Irish students.

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