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No point in paying over €300 an acre for reseeding if post-management is neglected

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IF you have gone to the trouble and expense of reseeding (up to €320/acre), every effort is needed to ensure that you have a dense, leafy clover/grass sward available for your stock next spring. Post-emergence management of ryegrass and clover seedlings, along with weed control, are both as important as sowing the new ley itself – this care is very much the same whether clover is present or not. 

Post Emergence Management: The aim of reseeding is to allow grass and clover seedlings establish and develop after sowing. Allowing the grass to get too high will shade out the clover seedlings. Grass seedlings will not tiller out in this situation either. Best suggested practice is to first lightly graze the sward with sheep or weanlings before closing for the winter.

This will encourage the young grass plants to tiller out and the sward to thicken up. A light grazing also exposes emerging clover to light and enables it to develop and grow. If possible, delay any cutting of silage for twelve months to allow grass tillering and clover establishment. 

Some light grazing of the reseeded sward may need to be carried out over the winter months to prevent grass from getting too high. A bag of CAN/acre can be applied after 15th January next year with a tight first grazing being undertaken. Avoid poaching of reseeded swards when grazing. Remove stock during periods of heavy rainfall.

 Weed Control: The most cost effective method of weed control is to use a post emergence herbicide.  The best time to control weeds is at the four leaf stage in weed seedlings. By using a clover safe post emergence spray, seedling weeds can be destroyed before they develop and establish root stocks. Established weeds can seriously reduce the yield potential and economic lifetime of the reseeded sward.

The post emergence spray should be applied approximately six weeks after establishment just before the first grazing takes place. Seedling docks and thistles along with tillage weeds such as Redshank, Rat Hen, Charlock and Chickweed can be controlled in newly established swards by using Legumex DB, Alistell, Underclear/Undersown and Mastercrop Undersown.

These sprays will not damage seedling clover after the trifoliate leaf stage; and they will not affect young grass shoots. Alistell and Underclear would be the products of choice if chickweed is present.

For non clover reseed swards, herbicide sprays such as Pastor, Nintex, Dockstar etc can be used. Check with local Agri-Merchants for other herbicide sprays that could be used. These sprays will wipe out any seedling clover present in the new ley. They will control most emerging perennial weeds and tillage weeds.

Again, they should be applied to new swards 6 to 8 weeks post sowing where needed. Follow the manufacturer’s advice on the information leaflet on each pack/container of spray in relation to rates/ha and dilution rates. Ensure to keep the prescribed Cross Compliance records for any chemical spray used.

Pest Control: Pests such as Leatherjackets, Wireworms and Frit flies should not be a problem in grass seedlings if the seedbed and field margins were free of trash and decaying organic material at the time of sowing. This deprives these pests of the environment on which they thrive. Slugs and leatherjackets could be a problem in heavier soils. If infestation is a serious problem, consult your local Teagasc Adviser/Agricultural Consultant or Agri-Merchants on what pesticide to use.

*Anthony O’Connor is a drystock adviser with Teagasc, Athenry. Comments to anthony.oconnor@teagasc.ie 

 

Connacht Tribune

New faces on IFA commodities committee

Francis Farragher

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A NUMBER of new faces will be elected onto the Galway IFA Commodities Committee in a postal vote that will begin next week and be completed by early December.

The most keenly contested position looks like being that of Rural Development representative with three candidates going for the job.

Eamonn Burke, Corrandulla branch, was the outgoing representative, but his term of office ends this month, opening the way for three new nominations.

They are: PJ Conroy, Looscaun, Woodford; Pat Flaherty, Oranmore and Peter Gohery of the Eyrecourt branch.

Rural Development is considered one of the more important positions in that it will be ‘fighting the case’ for the bigger spending areas such as REPS, GLAS and any new environmental scheme.

The other contest is for the position of Grain Representative which had been held by John Daly of Kilconnell, whose term of office is also up.

There are two nomination for this position – Eamonn Burke of Corrandulla and Mervyn Cooke of the Aughrim IFA branch.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Dosing changes will need watching

Francis Farragher

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Galway IFA Animal Health Committee Chairman, Stephen Canavan

THE Minister for Agriculture, Charlie McConalogue, has been advised to ‘keep his eye on the ball’ in relation to EU regulations coming down the track for the sourcing of livestock dosing treatments.

According to the IFA, new EU regulations due to come into force in 2022, would require farmers to get a prescription for a range of products including anthelmintics, used for the treatment of fluke and worms in cattle and sheep.

IFA Animal Health Chairman, Pat Farrell, said the new EU Veterinary Medicine Regulation had the potential to severely impact on competition in the supply of anthelmintics to farmers.

He also warned that because of a derogation in place in Northern Ireland as regards anthelmintics, the EU regulations would mean a two-tier supply system on the island of Ireland, leading to unregulated movement of products.

Galway IFA Animal Health Committee Chairman, Stephen Canavan, told the Farming Tribune, that the IFA wanted a continuation of the system where the stores and co-ops would have a suitable qualified person (SQP) to deal with the selling of such products.

“This regulation, if implemented in 2022, would have serious implications for farmers in carrying out their day-to-day farm work where for example they have dosing programmes in places for their livestock. We most certainly want the Minister for Agriculture and the Department to keep their eye on the ball on this issue.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

New TB test will not be a ‘runner’ say IFA

Francis Farragher

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Galway IFA Animal Health Committee Chairman, Stephen Canavan

THE Dept. of Agriculture have been accused of doing ‘yet another solo-run’ on bovine TB with their proposal to introduce a 30-day test for pre-sale movements at marts and from farm to farm.

Galway IFA Animal Health Committee Chairman, Stephen Canavan, told the Farming Tribune, said that news of the proposed new testing regime as revealed in last week’s Farmers Journal, came as ‘a bolt from the blue’.

“I suppose in one way we shouldn’t be surprised – the Department just keep coming up with these kinds of proposals without any agreement or input from farmers.

“We in IFA want to make it clear to the Department that this will be another non-runner. They went on one solo-run with the herd categorisation and now they’ve gone ahead with their next piece of tomfoolery,” said Stephen Canavan.

He said that there was absolutely no scientific proof or evidence that introducing this extra 30-day pre-movement test would in any way be a help in the campaign to reduce the incidence of TB in Irish herds.

“Either a farmer is clear or he’s not clear in terms of TB testing – there can be no in-between on this one.

“It is utterly ridiculous that a farmer after having two clear tests would end up a couple of months later having another test before he could sell stock at the mart or to another farmer.

“Who would pay for this test? Is this really just another way of taking more money from farmers whose herds have already had a clear test. It makes no sense at all,” said Stephen Canavan.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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