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Music from Hollywood with RTÉ orchestra

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It’s off to Hollywood this Saturday, October 24, courtesy of Music for Galway and the RTÉ Concert Orchestra.

The orchestra will be in Leisureland, performing music from renowned composer John Williams, including the main title from Star Wars, the main theme from Jaws, the Suite from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, The Raiders’ March from Raiders of the Lost Ark, Adventures on Earth from ET, the March from Superman, the theme from Schindler’s List, excerpts from Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Princess Leia’s Theme and the Throne Room from Star Wars.

It’s just a selection of the work from the great composer who has  has won five Academy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, seven British Academy Film Awards as well as 22 Grammy Awards.

This Saturday’s concert is conducted by Cork man John O’Brien and it will start at 7.30pm to facilitate a family audience.

Tickets cost €30 / €25 concessions and MFG Friends / €15 full-time students. Booking at Music For Galway on 091 705962 / Opus 2, High Street / www.musicforgalway.ie

CITY TRIBUNE

Branar adapt Rockin’ Rhymes for classroom setting

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Branar adapt Rockin’ Rhymes for classroom setting

Rockin’ Rhymes, the hit musical from Galway theatre company, Branar, was due to be revived for a tour of Irish schools this autumn. However, that can’t happen now.

Instead, it’s getting a new outing as a multi-platform show that’s being made available to schools throughout Galway, Mayo and Limerick

Branar has joined forces with The Linenhall Arts Centre in Castlebar and Limerick’s Lime Tree Theatre to create Rockin’ the Classroom, a project that’s designed for children from Junior Infants to Second Class.

Performed by a band of five musicians, this is a rock-n-roll adventure, featuring well-loved nursery rhymes which Branar has reimagined in funk, pop and rock stylings.

The show offers children and teachers an opportunity to explore these classic rhymes in a fresh context, while they learn about making music.

The project hopes to inspire children to create their own rocking rhymes, explains Marc Mac Lochlainn of Branar, who adds “we really miss performing for children”.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Covid caution pays off for Arts Festival

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Plans to site the Mirror Pavilion to Derrigimlagh Bog outside Clifden have now been deferred until March 2021.

The Mirror Pavilion art installation which was visited by over 120,000 people when it was displayed at the Claddagh during Galway International Arts Festival’s autumn programme will not be moving out to a Connemara location this month, despite earlier plans that it would.

The striking structure by world-renowned artist, John Gerrard, was due to be located at Derrigimlagh Bog outside Clifden in October but that plan has now been shelved until March, due to current Covid 19 restrictions.

The shiny cube which depicts an image on an LED wall 24 hours a day was a popular attraction while it was exhibited at Claddagh Quay last month. Images of it were circulated around the world, mostly on various social media platforms.

It was dismantled after September 26 and was due to move to Connemara, to the site where Alcock and Brown completed the first trans-Atlantic flight in 1919 and also the transmission site for the first trans-Atlantic radio signal from the Marconi station in 1907.

The installation, which was commissioned especially for Galway’s European Capital of Culture 2020 programme, was to be situated in Connemara for most of this month.

However, the Artistic Director of GIAF, Paul Fahy, told The Connacht Tribune that, some weeks ago, the Festival organisers had discussed the possibility of postponing it because of rising Covid-19 cases at home and abroad

“There was no point in going ahead with the Connemara installation in light of us going into Level 3, when the country’s population was in lockdown and couldn’t come into the county to see it, not to mention travel restrictions on other countries stopping them coming to Ireland,” he said.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Away with the Fairies – a spooky Halloween treat

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In recent years, Halloween in Ireland has become all about the imported American tradition of Trick or Treat – which may have, in a simpler form, originated in this country, according to experts.

But with Tricking and Treating off the menu for this year, it might be time to return to more traditional Irish traditions.

There’s no better place to start with fairy and ghost stories and these can be found in abundance in the latest book from city historian, William Henry.

Away with the Fairies, which is now in the shops, contains some 50 stories and tales gathered from across Galway, City and County, that have entertained countless generations.

“Ireland really is the heart of a supernatural tradition and some of its most famous manifestations include the Banshee, Cóiste Bodhar, Pooka, Leprechaun and the Fairies,” explains William.

“The stories and beliefs surrounding these characters formed part of everyday life for people long ago,” he adds. And it wasn’t so long ago either.

Introducing the stories, Mike Glynn, former editor of the Galway City Tribune, points out that in an era before rural electrification, “the sounds and movements of the night were truly frightening when there were only candles and crude lamps to cast limited light”.

Rural electrification only happened in the mid-20th century, which in the broad scope of history, is merely the blink of an eye.

William opens the book by introducing the reader to Ireland’s main fairy characters and this sets the scene for the extraordinary tales that follow.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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