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Mundy has youth on side for new album

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Mundy, who is playing the Róisín Dubh as part of a tour to mark the release of his new album. PHOTO: PERRY OGDEN.

The Groove Tube with Jimi McDonnell

Singer-songwriter Mundy will play Róisín Dubh on Friday, May 22, to celebrate the release of his self-titled new album.

This release sees the Birr songwriter reunite with the English producer, Youth, who produced Mundy’s 1996 debut Jelly Legs. Why did the Offaly man feel the time was right for them to work together again?

“A few years ago you would have seen people doing these anniversary gigs around, if they’d had an album out 15 or 20 years ago,” Mundy says. “I just realised that Jelly Legs was nearly 20 years old and Killing Joke, Youth’s band, were playing in town. I just thought it was a funny coincidence. I hadn’t seen him in the time since Jelly Legs.”

Given that it had been a while since the Irishman had seen Youth, he introduced himself by saying ‘I’m Mundy!’ The pair then went for a beer and caught up.

“I said I’d just become a dad, was still in the music business and things had gone well,” Mundy recalls. “I [also] said I was a bit uninspired at that time and he said ‘I know the feeling’. He’d had two kids and it takes getting used to. So he basically invited me over to London to his studio to write a few songs together. He said ‘I have a few ways to open up your mind – everything doesn’t have to come from the heart all the time’.  So I went over, and that’s how it began.”

Mundy sounds reinvigorated on this new album, something he credits to the man behind the desk.

“We were doing a session from 12 to 4pm and an hour before it would end Youth would say ‘have you got any lyrics yet? The muse doesn’t wait around, and he’s going to be gone at four, because I have another session coming in’.

“He’s very full-on and straight up. I like to understand what I’m trying to say and he’s like ‘no, no, you’ll get used to them. You don’t have to know what you’re trying to say. Give the songs a chance to breathe’. Just the kind of inspiration I needed.”

Mundy is in good voice too on this release, something he credits to both his lifestyle choices and his producer.

“I was minding myself, I wasn’t staying up late, smoking fags and getting drunk,” he says. “And Youth would say things like ‘sing it softer’, or ‘sing it in a higher register’. Shot In The Dark was quite a struggle to sing. But he said ‘push it to the max, don’t be afraid’. He brought out a little bit of youth in me!”

One of the songs that jumps out on the album is Glory Hole.  How did that one come about?

“Youth had been Googling me and Galway Girl came up, live at Oxegen, 12,000 or 13,000 people going nuts,” Mundy says, referring to his performance of Steve Earle’s song at Oxegen with musician Sharon Shannon. “He said ‘wow, did you write that song?’ I told him I wished I had done . He asked would I have liked to. Absolutely!

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Sisters in perfect tune for unique musical snapshot

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Breda and Claire Keville, photographed by Nutan. (Inset) The sisters, as depicted by artist Isabel Alegria, on the cover of the album.

Arts Week with Judy Murphy

“A snapshot in time,” is how musician and composer Claire Keville from Claran, near Headford, describes Music from Galway, the new CD which she and her sister Breda have just released.

With Breda on fiddle and Claire on concertina, it’s a gorgeous collection of music from all parts of Galway and beyond, a mix of slow airs, gigs, reels and marches. The sisters are accompanied by guitarist and longtime musical friend Terence O’Reilly on several tracks, which they recorded in the studio of his East Clare home in April of this year.

Claire, a French and Music teacher in Coláiste Iognáid (the Jes) in the city for the past decade, and Breda, who works as a radiation therapist in UHG, have previously released solo albums. Breda’s, The Hop Down, was released in 2006 and The Daisy Field, from Clare came out in 2009. Each guested on the other’s album, but this is their first joint recording, a project they’d been discussing for years.

When it did finally happen, it came together a lot more quickly than either of them had anticipated.

“I didn’t think we’d have it done this year,” says Breda, as Claire recalls that they discussed its timeframe in April, while driving from Galway to Terence’s home in Clare.

After that first day, when they recorded 10 tracks and realised that most of them would make the album, they reckoned it was achievable. Another session in An Spidéal with musician, ‘talented engineer and general all-rounder’,  Ronan Browne, convinced them it was and Music from Galway was launched at the Willie Clancy Festival in Miltown Malbay in July.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Connacht Tribune

Telebox channel youthful energy into mature sound

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Telebox...new single and Róisín gig.

Groove Tube with Cian O’Connell

Guitar-driven, alternative rock four-piece Telebox are the latest product of the talented youth music scene in Galway. And having packed out the Róisín Dubh in all all-ages gig in May, they are returning to the Dominick Street venue this Sunday at 2.30pm to celebrate the release of their second single.

The group consists of frontman Joe Kelly, guitarist Conall Ó Floinn, drummer Stevie Healy and bassist Eoin Killeen – and their Signs of Joy is available on streaming platforms from this Thursday. It is a smooth and hook-laden follow-up to Platonic Plague, a debut reminiscent of The La’s in its ringing guitars and post-punk pop melodies.

Telebox are a shining example of the ability that exists among teenage Galway musicians, and they serve as a reminder of the need for arts spaces that welcome crowds of all ages.

“For us, the reason we did [the Róisín gig] was that half of us are still underage,” Joe explains. “We find it really hard to get pub gigs and we have connections to the Róisín, so we went to them and said we’d love to do an all-ages thing.

“A lot of our friends are underage as well, so it was a chance for everyone to come together again. No one can go to pubs or anything like that and we’re too old for discos and that sort of thing. It’s a nice middle ground.”

“It was unbelievable,” Eoin recalls. “We couldn’t believe the energy that people brought. It’s like 2pm, 3pm in the day. People aren’t drinking, everyone is sober, and they’re still dancing and enjoying themselves.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Tunes in the Church returns with August concert series

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Tunes in the Church returns with August concert series

The Tunes in the Church concert series returns to Galway after a two-year break. The award-winning, series held in St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church, will run for the next two weeks, taking place on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday nights.

The concerts will feature some of Galway’s finest musicians, singers and dancers, with two musicians and a dancer performing each night. During the interval, there will be a short historical tour of St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church, which celebrated 700 years in existence in 2020.

Tunes in the Church began in 2010, set up by Kerry musician and Galway resident Cormac Begley, who wanted a way of presenting traditional music that was family-friendly and respected the tradition. It is an acoustic, authentic, personal and interactive representation of Irish music, song and dance.

Interaction between the audience and performers is central to the experience, Cormac explains, with relaxed, natural, conversation being a feature of all the concerts.

Tunes in the Church provides a respectful and family-friendly setting for the listener and creates a platform where leading exponents of traditional music can showcase their talents. For more information and to book go to www.tunesinthechurch.com

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