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Mood music to groove to from Jeremy Hickey

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Groove Tube with Jimi McDonnell – tribunegroove@live.ie

It could well be one of the gigs of the autumn – and it’s free. Rarely Seen Above Ground (RASG) plays Róisín Dubh on Thursday next, September 12, fresh from a headlining slot in the Body & Soul area at the Electric Picnic.

RSAG is a one-man show, put together by Kilkenny based drummer, Jeremy Hickey. He released Organic Sampler, his Choice Prize nominated debut, in 2008 and followed it with Be It Right Or Wrong in 2010.

In July this year, Rarely Seen Above Ground returned with the EP, Rotate and Jeremy is currently working on his third album.

“The whole idea was to bring that out before I went to finish off an album,” he says.  “I have songs there; it’s just a question of picking the right ones and finishing them off.”

RSAG’s rhythm based sound was arresting from the get go, and Jeremy plans to continue in that vein, while adding some new elements to the mix.

“On Organic Sampler, you have the main disk which had a post-punk, funky thing going on,” he says. “Then you had the bonus disk, which was a bit more soundtrack-y and instrumental. Then I went on to do Be It Right Or Wrong, which I did in Leo Pearsen’s studio in Thomastown, that was a different sound.

“Now I’ve gotten some better gear, and I’ve gotten back to the process and the techniques I uses on my first album. Now, it’s slightly evolving into a more electronic sound. I got a couple of synthesisers.”

Jeremy is currently recording at home, which he enjoys, but there also is an advantage to working in someone else’s studio.

“I like the idea of being able to work on something, that’s not exactly a nine-to-five thing,” he says about working from his own house. “But I suppose there’s a plus and minus side to it. It’s nice to have it there so you can work whenever you can, but the other side of it is that it’s nice to have a place to have to go to at a certain time, and then go home.  It’d be nice to have a studio that wasn’t in my house, but that’s just the way it is these days.”

RSAG is probably best described as ‘mood music’ and Jeremy draws a lot of inspiration from film soundtracks and novels.

“I suppose what I’ve done with Rotate and what I’d like to do with the album is basically try and write tunes with themes that would be inspired by a movie, or a book,  or an idea, and that mood is going to stay with the song until it’s finished.

“If a lyric isn’t there at the start, then the one that’s added will have to suit the mood,” Jeremy adds. “It’s almost like a soundtrack, but there’s no real story, it’s just the way it happens. The way I like to work is one week I could watch a movie and be in a certain mood, and hence a track would come from that. Another week it could be something different.”

Given that Rarely Seen Above Ground is a one-man operation, how does Jeremy ensure that the project keeps evolving?

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

CITY TRIBUNE

Sunday evening concert offers All the Pleasures

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Sunday evening’s concert will be performed by the Resurgam Choir and Irish Baroque Orchestra (pictured), under director Peter Whelan.

Music by George Frederic Handel and Henry Purcell as well as a world premiere by Irish composer Rhona Clarke will feature in Resounding Landscapes, a concert being presented by Music for Galway in association with Galway 2020 this Sunday, November 22. It will be live-streamed from the city’s St Nicholas’ Church, starting at 7pm.

It’s the second concert in the Abendmusik (Evening Music) series of vocal and choral performances, which forms part of Music for Galway’s programme for the European Capital of Culture project.

Sunday’s event will feature Welcome to all the Pleasures by the 17th century composer, Henry Purcell with text by Cristopher Fishburn; the world premiere of Rhona Clarke’s O Vis Aeternitatis – based on writings by the 12th century mystic, Hildegard of Bingen; and Handel’s Dixit Dominus.

The programme will be performed by the Resurgam Choir and Irish Baroque Orchestra (IBO), under director Peter Whelan, who is director of the IBO.

Creator of the Abendmusik Sunday evening concert series, Mark Duley feels that “in our current circumstance, it is good to be reminded by Fishburn in his text that ‘in music, we find relief from sorrow and grief’. And we can salute the venerable building of St Nicholas’ Church where for 700 years music has resounded and prayer has been valid.”

Meanwhile, a scheduled online production of the community opera, Paper Boat, which Music for Galway commissioned to celebrate the 700th anniversary of St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church, has been postponed.

Paper Boat is central to Music for Galway’s programme for Galway 2020 and before Covid-19 restrictions, there had been plans for a major live production of the site-specific composition in St Nicholas’ last June.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Chance to experience Fregoli’s Cross Street as the drama unfolds

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Enid trying to make sense of her life in 'Cross Street.

Fregoli Theatre Company will present a work-in-progress performance of its forthcoming play, Cross Street, on Saturday, November 28.

This virtual reading of their new comedy, written by the company’s co-founder Jarlath Tivnan, offers hints of horror while exploring mental health issues, according to its director Eimear Finan.

The story centres on Enid who’s searching for a new home and finds a place on Cross Street, one of Galway’s most happening spots.

However, she enters a space that’s is already populated by some serious creatures of habit. When Enid’s arrival threatens to disrupt well-worn routines, a house meeting is called to re-establish order. But on this stormy night, other events take over.

Cross Street explores how mental issues can grow and manifest when left to fester, says Eimear. Each of the housemates has an issue: these range from grief, guilt, alcoholism, eating disorders, neglect, self-harm and self-doubt. And each person isolates from anyone who might either interfere or help.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Resourceful Emma gets in step with Zoom during pandemic

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Connemara's heritage features strongly in Emma's sean-nós dance classes and in her Facebook videos.

If you fancy learning sean-nós dancing, now is your chance as renowned dancer Emma O’Sullivan is using technology to put her students through their paces – at home and abroad.

In normal times, the All-Ireland champion can be seen dancing on the junction of Mainguard Street and Cross Street in Galway City.

Emma, from Derryinver, Letterfrack, is a popular figure and videos of her performances have been shared by over 20 million viewers worldwide. Her skills as a sean-nós dance teacher mean she’s in constant demand for classes among children and adults as at home and abroad.

But like so many in the performing arts sector, Emma’s livelihood has been severely affected by the pandemic.

After her regular classes were cancelled in March when lockdown began, she decided to try something new. She complied a 30-minute introductory sean-nós dancing tutorial video, which she uploaded to YouTube.  The feedback was so good, she moved on to classes via Zoom – which her students have since nicknamed ‘zoom-nós’.

This hasn’t been without its challenges, she says.

“There’s so much more to consider. Lighting and audio were a bit difficult, because while Zoom is fine for just chatting, suddenly I needed to talk and play music too.”

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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