Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

CITY TRIBUNE

Market traders frustrated at being ‘rebuffed’ by Galway City Council

Published

on

It’s a firm favourite with local shoppers of a Saturday . . . and it’s a major attraction for visitors to the city, listed in all guide books and online reviews of ‘things to do’ when visiting the City of the Tribes.

However, traders at Galway’s famous market feel their concerns about the damaged surface at Churchyard Street are being ignored by management at City Hall.

Galway Market traders said they were ‘shocked’ to learn last week that an upgrade of the surface area of the market is not included in any phase of the resurfacing works on Shop Street, which is ongoing.

This is despite previous assurances from City Council management that Churchyard Street would be repaired as part of the overall Shop Street pedestrianisation project.

Traders estimated the total costs of urgent remedial works would be just €10,000. Some works are ongoing at the Lombard Street section of the market surface, as part of job to put in new electronic bollards, but traders have been told the Council doesn’t have the money to resurface the entire area.

Some 70 traders have stalls there every Saturday, and the Sunday market is becoming more attractive to stallholders with about 40 operating on Sundays. It is also a big attraction during Galway Arts Festival, and at Christmas time.

This year, St Nicholas’ Church celebrates its 700th year, which should attract further footfall to the area; and the market should also be busier with tourists coming here for Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture.

Dirk Flake, an organic vegetable grower based in Kinvara, and spokesperson for the Traders Committee, said the Council has confirmed that there are no plans to include the area in resurfacing works.

He said traders are “frustrated” at being “rebuffed” by senior Council management, and the “neglect” of the area. “There is no commitment, not even a promise,” he said.

“As traders, we are all in agreement that senior officials in Galway City Council need to take action now to make urgent repairs to prevent serious injury to market patrons and traders,” Mr Flake told the Galway City Tribune.

He said traders had been lobbying for the repairs for over two years – but to no avail. Galway West TD Catherine Connolly (Ind), he said, secured a meeting with officials, and contractors, during which it became apparent that Churchyard Street is not included in the present phase of resurfacing, and there are no plans to include the area in works scheduled for 2022.

Some gullies have been cleaned, which has resulted in less flooding, and a small are of uneven surface has been levelled. And he said that Councillor Collette Connolly (Ind) offered money left over from the Local Improvement Scheme to fix some ‘black spots’, but there was still no commitment from the Council “to do the maintenance works necessary to bridge the period until a major resurface can be planned for the market area”.

“We are looking for some kind of solution to address loose and broken paving which present a real hazard to patrons and pedestrians, many of whom are older with mobility issues,” said Mr Flake.

“Flooding in times of heavy rain also presents a real problem and it is only a matter of time before someone is seriously hurt as they try and navigate their way through the market. This has been really evident over this winter as the weather has been particularly challenging and it makes conditions in the market very difficult for traders and patrons. We have been trying for some time to meet with Council officials to have a constructive discussion on issues relating to the market, but our repeated requests have been ignored. This is all the more frustrating because our committee has had a very productive relationship with the Council in the past.

“There seems to be a general lack of awareness or appreciation among officials for the importance of the market to the city. Sometimes it can feel like we are invisible to the Council. While we have had great help from a few individual Councillors, we are asking all Councillors and Council officials to come and experience conditions in the market so they can see first-hand where the issues are.

“We have ongoing issues with proper street cleaning, access to electricity and proper loading and unloading facilities. Galway has been designated the City of Culture for 2020 and these works will only enhance the experience of the market and its contribution to the unique culture of Galway City,” he added.

CITY TRIBUNE

Cancer patients need better Covid protocols

Published

on

Galway City Councillor Alan Cheevers with Taoiseach Micheál Martin on his recent visit to the Dáil to petition for greater bowel cancer screening.

A CITY councillor and current cancer patient at University Hospital Galway (UHG) said this week that a better system should be put in place as regards Covid procedures for those undergoing chemotherapy, radium and other acute day-care treatments.

Cllr. Alan Cheevers told the Galway City Tribune that cancer patients on day treatment programmes at UHG should be completing an antigen test prior to entering the hospital.

“This would eliminate the need for phone surveys prior to their treatments and would be a lot more efficient in indicating as to whether a person was Covid-free or not,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

He stressed that he was suggesting this, not as a criticism, but as a practical way of ensuring that both patients and staff could go about their business in a far safer environment.

“What happens at present is that patients are contacted by phone the day before they are due to go for treatment and asked a series of questions.

“Given that in most cases the omicron variant seems so mild, the patient might have no idea that they could have Covid. “What I would like to see is the HSE providing free antigen tests which the patient could undergo a day or two before going in for treatment and then be able to provide the results of those to the hospital.

“It would just take all the guessing out of whether someone going in for treatment had, or had not, the Covid virus,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

The Fianna Fáil councillor from Roscam – who is currently undergoing a cancer treatment programme at UHG – also called for changes to be made as regards cancer and other vulnerable patients who might need to be admitted to hospital if they were feeling very unwell after treatment.

“If that happens, we are currently being told to seek admission to the hospital via the Accident and Emergency Department but I really don’t think that is satisfactory for such patients,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

He said that such patients – by virtue of their condition and treatment programme – would be that bit more vulnerable to picking up colds, viruses and infections.

“I just think that it should be possible for such patients to be admitted to the hospital – rather than having to go through the Emergency Department – which can get quite crowded at times.

“I believe that a solution could be provided whereby cancer patients would be admitted to the hospital without having to go through what is a high-risk environment,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

He added that where patients were vulnerable – such as those on cancer treatment – it should be possible to admit them to the hospital without having to go through ED.

“I think that it should be possible for example to be able to admit such patients through the cancer wards of the hospital. Again, I feel, that would be a safer way of doing things for both patients and staff,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

He said that he was making those observations not as a politician but as a cancer patient of UHG where he described the treatment and care provided to him and other patients as ‘second to none’.

“The oncology department at the hospital provide the most professional and caring service for their patients – it really is a wonderful service and delivered with great expertise and compassion by all involved, I would have to say. They are exceptional.

“My two concerns about the lack of pre-treatment antigen tests and the necessity to get admission through ED, are meant as constructive suggestions in the context of the current Covid situation,” said Cllr. Cheevers.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Barna homes can be closer to sea

Published

on

Barna

Members of Galway County Council have voted to allow development to take place in Barna village just 15 metres from the foreshore – as opposed to 30 metres as recommended by senior officials.

Fears were expressed that any developments that take place within 15 metres of the shoreline could be hit by flooding in the event of a storm or prolonged rainfall.

But a local councillor told a meeting of Galway County Council that he never witnessed flooding in Barna in his lifetime.

The nearest threat, according to Cllr Tomas O Curraoin, came from a prolonged storm in 2014 – but this resulted in just one boat being detached from its mooring.

He made his remarks while councillors were discussing the County Development Plan which proposed that there be a 30-metre setback from the foreshore to allow for the development of a coastal amenity park as well as the proposed Oranmore to Barna cycleway. But the independent councillor was not for moving and he proposed that a new setback of 15 metres for development from the sea be applied for Barna.

“There has never been a recording of flooding on these lands and there is no evidence that properties are at risk.

His proposal was seconded by Cllr Noel Thomas (FF) before the motion went to a vote which was carried with 19 councillors in support of the 15-metre setback, eight opposed with eight abstentions.

The only Connemara councillor to vote against the motion was Cllr Alastair McKinstry (Green) who wanted a 50 metre setback but he did not get a seconder for his proposal.

Senior planner Valerie Loughnane told the meeting that the reason for the 30-metre setback was to prevent the threat of flooding and so that the coastal amenity park could be catered for.

She urged councillors not to accept the 15-metre proposal and warned that when it came to planning applications, a flood risk assessment would be invariably sought by planners who would have to make their decisions based on the findings of this.

“There is no evidence to suggest that it could not be flooded at some point being so close to the sea,” Ms Loughnane added.

But it was pointed out by Cllr Daithi O Cualain (FF) that the coast road is a mere seven metres back from the shoreline and doesn’t flood.

He said that by having a 15-metre restriction seemed acceptable as far as he was concerned and added that he would be supporting the motion.

However, Cllr Jimmy McClearn (FG) said that he had enough experience of flooding and flood plains where he came from in South Galway.

He said that the concept of a 15-metre setback from the sea was not acceptable in his books and would be voting against the motion.

Cllr Thomas argued back that if proper structures were put in place along the coast, then there should be no threat of flooding – similar to Salthill, he added.

 

 

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway city broadcaster is the big winner as national radio station reshuffles the pack

Published

on

Pamela Joyce... new role.

Lunchtime won’t be break time for one Galway city-born broadcaster from the start of next month – because Pamela Joyce has been given a primetime slot in the latest shake-up at Today FM.

The former iRadio presenter, who has also worked with RTÉ, is the new host of the lunchtime show from 12 noon to 2pm – and she’s thrilled!

“I am beyond and excited and honoured to have my name above the door at lunchtimes on Today FM,” she said.

“This is a huge step for me personally and professionally and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into the show. You can expect all the best tunes, loads of craic and plenty of divilment. I can’t wait to keep the listeners company through their lunchtime.”

Pamela will make the move from her current evening slot – her latest elevation since joining the station three years ago.

She has been a regular voice on programmes across Today FM and has gained a social following for her Cardi P musical skits on Dermot & Dave.

Pamela Joyce grew up in Rahoon in Galway city, the youngest of four girls. The daughter of a Clifden father and a Ballyhaunis mother, she is a graduate of NUI Galway where she completed a BA in Theatre Studies in 2014.

She describes herself as a keen gamer and admits she lives for reality TV. She supports Man Utd, Connacht Rugby, Galway hurling and Mayo football.

Pamela speaks Irish, is fluent in Spanish – and took some time to learn French as well.

Her move is one of a number of changes that will also see Mayo native Ray Foley as the new voice of afternoons, and Ian Dempsey add an extra hour to his morning show, which means he’s now on air from 6am.

But the shake-up is bad news for another Galway-born presenter – because Today FM has confirmed that Fergal D’Arcy will depart the station. The Ballinasloe man will continue to present his afternoon show in the coming weeks – until the new schedule kicks in.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending