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Galway Bay FM News Archives

March 30, 2011

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 30-Mar-2011

1911

Fever outbreak

At a meeting of Gort District Council, Dr. Moran reported that a mild case of typhus fever had occurred in Knockercoura, and he had the patient removed to hospital, and the bed and bedding burned, and the house fumigated. He also reported a case of undefined fever from Gort, and had the patient removed to hospital, and the bed and bedding burned, and the room fumigated.

Dr. Moran, replying to a Guardian, said there was absolutely no fever whatever in the town, and no grounds for the report that there was.

Chairman: I hope you will have no bad results in any of the cases. Dr. Moran: No, I will have no bad results.

Drs. Moran and Foley reported that in consequence of the outbreak of fever, they wished to procure certain disinfectants without waiting for the Guardians’ formal authority. Dr. Foley suggested the procuring of a disinfecting apparatus, as if they had an epidemic the cost of burning bedding and clothing would come to a big lot. If they burned some old beds, they might create a lot of displeasure, and although their market value might not be much, they were prized by their owners for their old associations. The Council should inquire where they would get the cheapest disinfecting apparatus.

Clerk: As long as I remember, the Inspectors of the L.G. Board are suggesting it here. What would it cost, a couple of hundred pounds? Dr. Foley: Not at all; an ordinary pump and spray would do it. Mr. Carr: Would a good spraying machine do it as well? (laughter). Dr. Foley: It would, Bill, if you had a pump to it (renewed laughter). Mr. Carr: You are right, Doctor (loud laughter).

1936

Galway Port

After over a century in office, Galway Harbour Board passed out of existence at noon on Wednesday, yielding place to a new body which may in turn have to give way under a general system for the election of harbour commissioners to control all the ports and harbours of the Saorstat.

The old board eliminated itself that Galway’s long-neglected outlet to the sea may be developed. This, as well as its recent efforts in this direction, will always be remembers to it for righteousness. The new Board still has heavy and uphill work, but if it is run on business lines, with the financial backing of two important bodies behind it, we should see new hope in Galway within a very few years.

Connemara tourism

Glorious weather has prevailed in Connemara during the past few weeks and it is expected that many hundreds of tourists will spend the Easter weekend in the area. Almost all the foremost hotels have good bookings and many of those who come will be renewing an acquaintance of previous years. Already, large numbers of anglers are in evidence, many of them from across the Channel. For the most part, these are spending their time around the Corrib, where the fishing this year is remarkably good.

Schools in the West

Mr. Sean Broderick, T.D. (Galway), on the debate in the Dáil on the vote for Education, brought out some surprising facts regarding the policy of the Department of Education and the Board of Works in the provision of schools in the West. It appears there is no settled policy concerning construction grants and that dissatisfaction exists on this account.

Mr. Broderick referred to the absence of cooperation between the Department and the managers of the schools. “One finds that applications for new schools have been made as far back as five and six years ago, and that these schools have not yet been erected. The application is first made to the Minister for Education, the Board of Works then comes into the matter.

“I know instances in which schools are being erected by the Board of Works and in which the Board refused to give the manager even the estimated cost of the school,” he said.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway Bay FM News Archives

Galway ‘Park and Ride’ could become permanent

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 07-May-2013

A park ‘n’ ride scheme from Carnmore into Galway city could become a permanent service if there is public demand.

That’s according to the Chief Executive of Galway Chamber of Commerce, Michael Coyle.

The pilot scheme will begin at 7.20 next Monday morning, May 13th.

Motorists will be able to park cars at the airport carpark in Carnmore and avail of a bus transfer to Forster Street in the city.

Buses will depart every 20 minutes at peak times and every 30 minutes at offpeak times throughout the day, at a cost of 2 euro per journey.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Tuam awaits UK hay import as overnight rainfall adds to fodder crisis

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 09-May-2013

Tuam is now awaiting a third import of hay from the UK as overnight rainfall has increased pressure on farmers struggling to source fodder.

A total of ten loads are expected at Connacht Gold stores throughout the West with a load expected at the Airglooney outlet this evening or tomorrow.

Farmers throughout the county have been struggling to cope with the animal feed shortage and a below than normal grass growth due to unseasonal weather conditions.

Overnight rainfall in the Galway area has also added to the problem making ground conditions in many areas are quite poor.

Joe Waldron, Agricultual Advisor with Connacht Gold says farmers in short supply can contact the Airglooney outlet on 093 – 24101.

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Galway Bay FM News Archives

Transport Minister urges end to Bus Eireann strike action

Bernie Ni Fhlatharta

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Date Published: 12-May-2013

The Transport Minister is urging drivers at Bus Éireann to engage in talks with management, in an effort to bring their strike action to an end.

There were no Bus Éireann services operating out of Galway today as a result of nationwide strike action by staff affiliated with the national bus and rail union.

Up to 20 Bus Éireann drivers are continuing to picket outside the bus depot at the docks in the city this evening.

Drivers from other unions have decided not to cross the picket line and go into work today – causing the disruption to be even worse.

Bus drivers are protesting against five million euro worth of cuts to their overtime and premium pay – cuts which Bus Eireann says are vital to ensure the future viability of the company.

The majority of services nationwide are disrupted, and the union say strike action will continue until management are willing to go back into negotiations.

However, it’s not expected to affect school services next week.

Galway bay fm news understands that around 70 percent, or over 100 Galway bus Eireann drivers are affiliated with the NBRU.

 

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