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CITY TRIBUNE

Locals discuss seeking judicial review of planning grant for Galway housing estate

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Residents in Rosshill are to to consider a High Court judicial review after An Bord Pleanála granted permission for the development of 102 homes on the former Par 3 golf course there.

Planners gave the green light to Alber Developments to proceed with phase one of what was previously a 342-unit development that was turned down by the Board after it was branded a ‘substandard’ form of development on the site.

With 33 planning conditions attached, the Strategic Housing Development (SHD) application submitted for Rosshill Manor in July was successful despite Galway City Council’s opposition.

SHD legislation is used to fast-track proposals for more than 100 residential units by submitting applications directly to An Bord Pleanála after consultations with local authority planners.

Phase one of the development includes for 11 one-bed apartments; 24 two-bed apartments; 11 four-bed houses; and 56 three bed-houses.

Also included is a childcare facility and car parking (14 spaces), along with retail and commercial space.

Each housing unit is to be provided with two car parking spaces, amounting to 130 in total, with a further 134 bicycle parking spaces.

For each apartment, there would be one car parking space, with one visitor car space for every four apartments, giving a total of 43 spaces. One bicycle space per apartment bedroom, with a visitor space for every two apartments amounts to 77 in total.

The planning application commits to access and junction improvements at Rosshill Road and Rosshill Stud Farm Road, with the provision of a footpath connectivity link along both routes.

In a submission to An Bord Pleanála, Chief Executive of Galway City Council Brendan McGrath recommended a refusal of permission, stating that it would “constitute overdevelopment” of the site and “would be significantly out of character with the established pattern of development in the area”.

Mr McGrath said the development would be “premature” due to the “existing deficiency of pedestrian, cycling and public transport infrastructure on the road network serving the area” and would result in “traffic congestion in the area”.

Transport Infrastructure Ireland (TII) also objected to the proposal and said a grant of permission would set a precedent that “would adversely affect the operation and safety of the national road network”.

Conditions attached to the grant of permission include a stipulation that the developer must, prior to commencing works, enter an agreement with Galway City Council over requirements for social and affordable housing as part of the scheme – with up to 20% required under the amended Planning and Development Act.

There is also a stipulation that ‘cuckoo funds’ – corporate investors that buy up property for letting – will be restricted and all houses must be occupied by individual purchasers.

The conditions demand that the development should be carried out on a phased basis and that “no dwelling shall be occupied” until the Rosshill Road junction is realigned and a footpath link completed.

No more than 50% of dwellings can be occupied prior to the completion of the childcare facility “unless the developer can demonstrate to the written satisfaction” of the City Council that a childcare facility is not needed.

The board has instructed that roof garden that was included in the application must be moved to an area mooted for carparking spaces, resulting in the loss of 14 spaces – and that 10% of all communal car parking spaces must be provided with electric vehicle charging points.

No additional development is permitted to take place above roof parapet level, including lift motors, air conditioning systems, storage tanks or telecommunication equipment.

A spokesperson for the Rosshill Residents’ Association confirmed to the Galway City Tribune that locals were considering their options.

“We are going to have a meeting on Sunday evening to look at it. Our only option now is judicial review, which is an expensive option, but we are going to discuss it,” said the spokesperson.

The belief locally was that this development was simply a way of getting the previously rejected proposal for 342 units “in through the back door”.

CITY TRIBUNE

Classy Clodagh will need to know her ABCs when she takes mayoral chains

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Councillors will resume deliberations on the City Draft Development Plan in June. And if the recently-agreed County Development Plan is anything to go by, Mayor in Waiting (MIW) Clodagh Higgins will need to have her ABCs in order to deal with the baptism of fire awaiting her.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Galway City Councillors will resume deliberations on the Draft City Development Plan in June, which means two things: long meetings and an even longer list of abbreviations.

The former is a given when rezoning of land is at play; the latter is also likely if the City Plan mirrors the recently-agreed County Development Plan which contained an alphabet soup of shortened phrases.

From ABTA (Area Based Transport Assessment) to MASP (Metropolitan Area Strategic Plan), NWSMP (National Wastewater Sludge Management Plan) to GCTPS (Galway County Transport and Planning Study), and GCMA (Galway County Metropolitan Area) to UFP (Urban Framework Plan) to name but a few, County Councillors were bombarded with shorthand as they compiled a new Development Plan.

And that’s before you mention the myriad of organisations OPR (Office of Planning Regulator), OPW (Office of Public Works), NTA (National Transport Authority), TII (Transport Infrastructure Ireland) who were making submissions about MAs (Material Alterations), WWTP (Waste Water Treatment Plants), LAPs (Local Area Plans), and LTP (Local Transport Plans) etcetera.

County Councillors needed qualifications in abbreviations and gobbledegook just to keep up with it all; many are now suffering a sort of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and the DTs (Delirium Tremens) or AWD (Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium) since they finalised the plan, but that’s all due to withdrawal from abbreviations rather than alcohol.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Legendary Andy Irvine in concert

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Andy Irvine

Legendary singer/songwriter Andy Irvine will play the Gig Room in the Kinvara Community Centre next Saturday, May 28, at 8pm.

With an impressive repertoire of Irish songs and Balkan dance tunes, he is renowned for his unique fusion of Irish and World music.

Andy’s musical career took off when he joined Sweeney’s Men in 1965, touring extensively with them before leaving in 1968 to pursue his own musical journey. That took him to Bulgaria, Romania and Yugoslavia, as he studied the music and traditions of these places.

During this time, he began playing the bouzouki professionally, as it allowed him to develop his own style while deepening his knowledge of Balkan music.

Back in Ireland Andy founded the now-legendary Planxty with Christy Moore, Donal Lunny and Liam O’ Flynn. When the group took a break in 1967, he recorded an album with Paul Brady, simply entitled Andy Irvine & Paul Brady, which became a classic.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

World premiere to feature in free concert

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Dave Flynn

The world premiere of E-Bow, a work for string quartet and electric guitar by  composer Dave Flynn, will take place this Sunday, May 22, at 3pm at the O’Donoghue Theatre, NUIG. Admission is free and all are welcome.

E-Bow will be performed by Galway’s quartet in residence, ConTempo, and Dave Flynn himself. A work in three movements, it plays with the tradition of the guitar quintet, which dates back to the late 18th century, but brings it in new directions by using an electric guitar with the addition of an e-bow.

This is a hand-held electronic bow invented by Greg Heet in 1969 and patented in 1978, after which it became an essential tool for rock guitarists. Performers including Blondie, U2, Radiohead, Big Country, Genesis, Pink Floyd and R.E.M. have used them, but e-bows are less common in classical music because they don’t work on nylon-string classical guitars.

The work was co-commissioned by long-term commissioning partners Galway Music Residency (GMR) and Galway City Council and is being presented  as part of Arts in Action, by  GMR, in association with Dublin’s Contemporary Music Centre.

Sunday’s show will also include a performance of Philip Glass’ Mishima, arranged for string quartet and electric guitar, with special permission from the composer. Philip Glass composed this piece for the film Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters, about Japanese author Yukio Mishima who died in November 1970 after performing Seppuku (ritual suicide by disembowelment).

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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