Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Opinion

Knowing when to say ‘no’ in the great rat race of life

Published

on

Roy Keane . . . Chasing that elusive goal of contentment.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

There is an old value system in country life about being a good worker. Most of us can’t resist the odd boast here and there about being up at the crack of dawn (although that’s not any great ‘gaisc’ this time of the year) and not finishing our work until very late into the evening, and we’re proud of what we achieve over any 24 hour period.

However there will be the evening here and there when the batteries run out and the start of the nine o clock news quite gently slips into a world of sleep and dreams, before there’s a little sprint made to the bedroom. It’s quite simply our bodies telling us that they’ve had enough for one day, and that a rest is needed. All we have to do is listen and not feel guilty about it.

Last week as I glanced through an edition of the John Deere magazine, The Furrow, a publication that in-between the sales blurbs for the big green tractor giants, also contains some very informative articles, there was a most enlightening piece about finding the right balance between work, play and your private life.

Apparently one of the trends being detected across Europe amongst farmers – and often in the younger age group – is the tendency to suffer burn-out. Family demands, from such things as young children to ageing parents – thrown in with the job of running and developing a successful farm – just prove too much for many people.

The term often used to describe that not so nice place, where everything seems to be getting on top of you is called burn-out, and if not nipped in the bud, can, according to most experts in the field, be a forerunner to more serious consequences such as depression, a nervous breakdown or in extreme cases suicide.

Two categories of people seem to be at particular risk of suffering from burn-out: those who cannot say no when asked to take on extra work and who value their worth almost exclusively on their job ‘performance’ – and the perfectionists who cannot tolerate mistakes of any kind.

The most likely people to suffer from burn-out are those who are highly motivated; who are very good at their jobs and who are generally admired by their colleagues for their commitment and output in the workplace, whether it be a factory floor, an office or a farm.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council was in slow lane with incorrect speed signage

Published

on

Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

At long last, sense has prevailed at City Hall. It was a slow process, but finally – after over a decade – incorrect speed limit signs displayed on some city roads will be corrected.

That it took a campaign by concerned citizens, and in particular bike enthusiast Kevin Jennings, for Galway City Council to rectify its own mistakes, is disgraceful but hardly surprising.

That Jennings had to highlight the issue in this newspaper and other media and had to badger local and national politicians before management at City Hall agreed to take action on a serious matter of road safety, is also a disgrace but not surprising either.

Jennings regularly cycles with his children on one of the roads in Knocknacarra where an incorrect speed limit sign had been displayed for up to 12 years. He discovered that several roads within the city boundary which have designated speed limits of 50km/h, had speed signs on them suggesting they were in 80km/h zones.

Among the roads with incorrect 80km/h signs were: Upper Cappagh Road, Upper Ballymoneen Road, Rahoon Road, Letteragh Road, Rosshill Road, Dublin Road and Oranmore Coast Road.

The signs were dangerous and gave false assurances to motorists that they could legally drive at 80km/h in 50km/h zones.

As well as endangering all road users, who would have been responsible in the event of a collision on one of those roads, if the motorist was driving above 50 but below 80? Would it have been the driver or the local authority? The legal profession would have had a field day.

What we think happened is this. Rather than change the signs to reflect the actual speed limit, the City Council attempted to change the speed limit to reflect the signage that was in place. Councillors rejected the 80km/h in proposed new bylaws in a vote last November and then the executive blamed elected members for the incorrect signs. It would be funny were it not so serious.

Jennings was a dogged campaigner – a trait of Galway Cycling Campaign members – and kept the pressure up for the signs to be corrected.

A victory of sorts arrived this month when Chief Executive Brendan McGrath confirmed “an audit of the existing signage has now been completed and a number of anomalies have been identified”.

The Council, he said, “commenced the process, in September, of modifying the speed limit signage at a number of locations in the city to bring the signage in line with the current Special Speed Limit Bylaws, 2009”.

That they did so kicking and screaming is the great mystery surrounding this sorry affair.

This is a shortened preview version of Bradley Bytes. To read more, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Northern stand-off underlines President’s independent spirit

Published

on

Roman triumph...President Michael D Higgins meeting Pope Francis last week.

World of Politics with Harry McGee – harrymcgee@gmail.com

There was a time when becoming President was like being sent to the Missions; one day you were here and then you were gone for seven years without a trace.

Patrick Hillary’s 14 years in the office between 1976 and 1990 produced only two particularly memorable events; a disputed phone call from Brian Lenihan asking him not to dissolve the Dáil, and a press conference to deny a rumoured affair of which nobody in the media had been remotely aware.

Otherwise, like many other Presidents, Hillary’s term was relatively anonymous, another prisoner of the very circumscribed Constitutional role of a non-executive president.

The President had few powers but the few powers were important: summoning and dissolving the Dáil, appointing the Taoiseach and members of the Government, as well as referring Bills to the Supreme Court to test their constitutionality.

It was the latter power that brought the presidency of Cearbhaill Ó Dálaigh to a dramatic end in 1976, when a Fine Gael minister Paddy Donnegan slighted him by describing him as a “thundering disgrace” after his decision to refer special powers legislation to the Court.

That all changed after 1990 with the election of Mary Robinson. She enlarged the role of the office as did her successor Mary McAleese. So has Michael D Higgins and while the office is in name ‘above politics’, he more than anybody else has stretched that concept.

Last week, I travelled to Rome to cover the President’s visit to the Italian capital, his first visit abroad since the Covid-19 Pandemic in March 2020.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Changing times for the Church – but still a distance left to travel

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

It’s the best part of twenty years since I delivered my one and only sermon to the masses at the Masses – in the salubrious surrounds of Mullingar Cathedral.

It wasn’t an actual sermon of course, but more a talk where the sermon should have been, on a Sunday during Lent in the year 2004.

I’d been in Rwanda with a team from Trocaire, where we’d seen tangible evidence of a world devoid of humanity, ten years after the genocide that had wiped out up to a million Tutsis in one hundred days.

Each year for their Lenten campaign, Trocaire choose a specific region in the world to highlight their work and the plight of the people there – so it might be Honduras after Hurricane Mitch, Nigeria and its endemic food poverty…or, in this case, the aftermath of genocide in Rwanda.

The sheer barbarism of what happened in this Country of a Thousand Hills will remain embedded on my brain for the rest of my days – and that was a decade after it happened. And that’s the story I was telling from the altar in Mullingar Cathedral.

I’d originally be slated down for Saturday evening Mass and then maybe one on Sunday – but I sort of got into a rhythm on Saturday night and volunteered to do all of the Masses the following day.

The final one was the Bishop’s own Mass, and Michael Smith was a man wholeheartedly committed to the work of Trocaire – so even he stood aside to let me at it.

And to crown it all, my wife and two little boys of five and four (as they were) sat in the congregation for this big finale.

But anyone with small children will know that keeping them quiet and attentive for the duration of a Mass is a job of work, and soon they began to grow restless.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending