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‘Kick-ass’ jazz festival to scale new heights

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London based Irish vocalist Lauren Kinsella will play Electric on October 7 as part of this year's Jazz Festival.

Groove Tube with Jimi McDonnell – tribunegroove@live.ie

Featuring an array of local, national and international talent, the Galway Jazz Festival will run from Thursday, October 6, to  Sunday, October 8 in venues across Galway City, from the rarefied Mick Lally Theatre to the clubby hub that is Electric.

Artistic director Matthew Berrill takes some time to talk about what is, in some ways, a labour of love for those involved.

“We were quite prepared this year, relatively speaking, in getting the programming done,” he says. “Even without funding guaranteed, before funding answers had come back to us. We said ‘we’re going to do the festival by hook or by crook’.”

Matthew and Ciaran Ryan were integral in securing international artists like Christian Wallumrod. But given that both of them are working musicians in their own right, putting a four-day festival together must be challenging?

“It is a challenge, but it’s a fun one,” Matthew says. “There’s more than Ciaran and me – there’s Aengus Hackett, a great local guitarist, and Maeve Bryan. So there’s good team there. We’re not doing it for the money — there’s no money in it, really. It’s just to present a kick-ass jazz festival in Galway.”

GJF is now in its eleventh year, having been founded by Fidelma Mullane and Damien Evans. Funding has always been a challenge, and last year’s festival was a one-day event, what Matthew called ‘a stop gap’. But,  after a successful FundIt campaign and funding from many of the leading lights in Galway’s food and hospitality sector, the festival is set to thrive.

“This year’s is the most comprehensive one yet,” Matthew says.

Christian Wallumrod and his ensemble play the Mick Lally Theatre on Sunday, October 9, and is Matthew is a big fan of the Norwegian pianist.

“He’s got a particular Nordic sound, which is quite  well-known in the jazz world,” Matthew says. “It can be subtle, it’s not necessarily in your face. I heard him before, Music For Galway brought him and his ensemble here. Me and my brother Peter heard him, and he was just amazing.

“It’s very representative of creative, European jazz. It’s not one hundred miles an hour, in your face – there’s subtleties involved. They’re doing an acoustic concert in the Druid . The venue influenced that.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Landmark gig underlines need for designated cultural spaces

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Back at last...James Vincent McMorrow at the Iveagh Gardens.

Groove Tube with Cian O’Connell

James Vincent McMorrow’s Iveagh Gardens performance on June 10 was a landmark moment for Irish music. The pilot gig may have been dry, socially distanced and limited to an audience of 500 – but, for those in attendance and those on stage, it represented an emotional return.

McMorrow’s quote early in his ninety-minute set has been popularised by media outlets in the show’s aftermath: “I didn’t realise how much I needed this until it gets taken away…”

Unsurprisingly, the Dublin singer-songwriter is now acutely aware of the role live music holds for him. And as grateful as he was to be given the opportunity to pioneer the country’s move back into venues, he has been vocal in his criticism of the opportunities afforded to Irish musicians in a live setting. The dearth of artistic spaces, as well as the housing crisis in Dublin and nationwide, is the subject of McMorrow’s new collaborative project Co-Living Culture.

The group is completed by Cody Lee and David Anthony Curley, previously of Otherkin. Their single Renegador is out June 25 on Faction Music Group’s newest imprint Lost Decay.

The song is something of a separation from the indie-folk singer’s personal catalogue. A noisy, anthemic EDM track, it is a tune intended for a bouncing electronic venue – the likes of which, McMorrow and his bandmates suggest, is lacking in the capital.

“Renegador started out as an incredible amount of fun in the studio one day,” they recall. “The more we worked on the song, the more we talked about places in Dublin where you might hear a record like this being played.

“Honestly, we struggled to come up with any. In the last five years so much has changed, we are of the opinion that cultural and art spaces are the beating heart of a city, but so many of them have been taken away and replaced with structures that aren’t meant for those who occupy the city at all.”

If Co-Living Culture is a criticism of the issues facing Irish musicians by way of arts spaces, it is also a celebration of the resilience and adaptability of the good people working in the industry.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Anne’s Roses of Hope for Médecins Sans Frontières

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Kinvara artist Anne Korff has launched an initiative to support the work of Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders).

It’s a new book, Roses of Hope – Meditations, which contains a selection of six reproductions of her artwork, 25×25 cm in size, ring-bound and with a hanging attachment, ready to display on a wall.

Roses of Hope – Meditations was created as a series of paintings during the pandemic in 2020-21. Throughout this period of solitude and isolation, Anne wanted to share her artwork as a way of providing support, inspiration and nourishment for the soul. Each painting is a meditation using energy, colour and shape to bring hope and solace.

According to the Irish Times’ art critic Aidan Dunne, ‘Anne Korff’s paintings vividly reflect her experience of the refugee crisis . . . in a space of what feels like infinite loss, flickers of hope appear’.

Anne, who studied Fine Art in Berlin moved to Ireland in 1977. A decade later, inspired by her passion for history and archaeology she set up her own publishing company, Tír Eolas. Her publications include beautifully illustrated guides and maps of the Burren, south Galway, Lough Corrib, The Shannon Valley, as well as The Book of the Burren.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Film Fleadh’s invitation to pitch a script

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Submissions are now open for the annual Film Fleadh Script Pitching Competition, which will be held next month as part of the online festival.

The competition focuses on the crucial role of good writing in the audio-visual sector and has provided many writers with an opportunity to get Entrants should submit a 500-word written pitch (from beginning to end with no cliff-hangers!) and applications are welcome from writers of any skill level. Any genre of feature drama, documentary or animation will be considered.  Finalists will be chosen to pitch their idea live online as an ‘Elevator Pitch’ of 90 seconds to a virtual panel of industry judges and an audience. The winner will be announced at the Fleadh’s online awards ceremony and will receive a prize of €3,000.

In addition to the money and the opportunity to pitch to industry professionals, there are other benefits to taking part. These includes opening the door to producers; writers having their project optioned by producers; being invited on mentorships to hone their craft; bolstering their confidence and giving them their first opportunity to win over an audience. For the winner, the money can allow them the time to develop and expand their pitch into a full film script.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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