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CITY TRIBUNE

Keane tries to downplay importance of result as Connacht gear up for Gloucester

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Connacht prop Denis Buckley runs onto the pitch before the start of last Friday's PRO14 clash against Edinburgh. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

BEFORE reporters’ Dictaphones and sound recorders were all switched on, Connacht head coach Kieran Keane can be overheard saying to centre Bundee Aki: “They don’t want to listen to me, they want to listen to you. Rock star!”

There’s no doubting the newly crowned Six Nations Grand Slam champion has star quality. Bundee is box office gold. But at the midweek press conference to preview Saturday’s crunch clash with Gloucester (Sportsground, 1pm), it was KK, as he’s referred to by players, and not Aki, who provided intriguing insight into where Connacht are ‘at’, and where they’re going.

So, while the narrative every week emanating from College Road is that Connacht are taking it ‘game by game’, ‘one game at a time’ or ‘not looking past the next game’, Keane has revealed a broader vision.

When it’s put to him that this is Connacht’s biggest game of the season, he’s not convinced. “Possibly. Possibly. For the fans, and for the organisation, perhaps, but we’ve got other things on our mind as well,” he said.

Maybe the Kiwi coach, in this his first season at the helm, is trying to dampen supporters’ expectation, and/or take pressure away from his players, but Keane doesn’t regard beating Gloucester as the ‘be all and end all’.

“No, I don’t quite see it in those eyes. The supporters really want to see us kick on, and we want to kick on, but in the greater scheme of things, we have to be pragmatic and honest about it.”

Still, with the westerners lagging in the league, this weekend’s European Challenge Cup quarter-final is being billed as a make or break game for Connacht in terms of qualifying for the more prestigious Champions Cup next season.

“Without a doubt. There’s no grey area there,” agreed Keane later, before adding a caveat. “But winning that is not a panacea for curing all our ills. I think the issues that we face right from the get-go is being able to adapt to a new way of playing, different playing group, different coaching group. These things take time.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

 

CITY TRIBUNE

Mercury hit 30°C for Galway City’s hottest day in 45 years

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –

Wednesday was the hottest day in the city over the past 45 years when with a high of 30.1 Celsius being recorded at the NUI Galway Weather Station.

The highest temperature ever recorded in the city dates back to June 30, 1976, when the late Frank Gaffney had a reading of 30.5° Celsius at his weather station in Newcastle.

Pharmacists and doctors have reported a surge in people seeking treatment for sunburn.

A Status Yellow ‘high temperature warning’ from Met Éireann – issued on Tuesday – remains in place for Galway and the rest of the country until 9am on Saturday morning.

It will be even hotter in the North Midlands, where a Status Orange temperature warning is in place.

One of the more uncomfortable aspects of our current heatwave has been the above average night-time temperatures and the high humidity levels – presenting sleeping difficulties for a lot of people.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Property Tax hike voted down in Galway City

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A proposal to boost Galway City Council coffers by half a million euro every year by increasing Local Property Tax (LPT) did not receive the support of city councillors.

Councillor Peter Keane (FF) failed to get a seconder at this week’s local authority meeting for his motion to increase the LPT payable on Galway City houses by 5%.

Cllr Keane said that the increase would net the Council €500,000 every year, which could be spent evenly on services across all three electoral wards.

It would be used to fund services and projects city councillors are always looking for, including a proposal by his colleague Cllr Imelda Byrne for the local authority to hire additional staff for city parks.

The cost to the taxpayer – or property owner – would be minimal, he insisted.

“It would mean that 90% of households would pay 37 cent extra per week,” he said.

Not one of the 17 other elected members, including four party colleagues, would second his motion and so it fell.

Another motion recommending no change in the current rate of LPT in 2022 was passed by a majority.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council needs 40 more workers to help deliver on projects

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –  Forty more workers are needed at City Hall ‘right away’, the Chief Executive of Galway City Council has said.

Brendan McGrath has warned city councillors that the local authority is understaffed and it needs to hire more staff immediately to deliver its plans and projects.

The total cost of the extra 40 workers, including salary, would be between €1.75 million and €1.95 million.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council had a workforce now that was below what it had in 2007, but the city’s population has grown and so too had the services the Council provides.

The population of Galway City grew by almost 11% in the 10 years to 2016, he said, and total staff numbers in the Council fell by 13.6% during that period.

Though more staff were hired in recent years, Mr McGrath said that the Council was at 2007 and 2008 staffing levels, even though the Census will record further increases in population since 2016.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council now provides 1,000 services across a range of departments, far more than during the 2000s.

He said that currently, 524 staff are employed at the City Council. This equated to 493 Whole Time Equivalents when part-time workers such as school wardens and Town Hall workers are included.

Mr McGrath said that 12% of all staff are in acting up positions, with many more in short-term or fixed-term contracts. There was a highly competitive jobs market and the Council was finding recruitment and retention of specialist staff difficult.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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