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CITY TRIBUNE

Jail sentence for man who stabbed two friends

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A 22-year-old intoxicated man stabbed a classmate in the leg with a screwdriver and ten months later stabbed a childhood friend five times with a large kitchen knife while they were playing videogames.

Ronan Timothy, 1 Greenview Heights, Newcastle, has been in custody since the second attack occurred last summer.

He pleaded guilty before Galway Circuit Criminal Court last November to assaulting his 22-year-old friend, causing him harm at a house on Ardilaun Road, Newcastle, on July 3 last year. He also pleaded guilty to producing a large kitchen knife in the course of that assault.

Timothy further pleaded guilty to assaulting a classmate at his own home in Greenview Heights on September 14, 2017.

Sentence for both assaults was adjourned to this month for the preparation of reports.

Gardai Killian Fitzmaurice told the hearing the attack on the classmate occurred when a group of Timothy’s classmates from GTI went back to his home one evening. They had been drinking all day and while they were talking in Timothy’s room, he suddenly picked up a screwdriver and stabbed his victim in the thigh.

The victim went to A&E, but left after waiting hours there to be seen. He went to his own GP the following day. The puncture wound was cleaned and the victim was given a tetanus shot.

Garda Fitzmaurice said the victim did not wish to attend court but he had given a victim impact statement which the Garda read into evidence.

In it, the victim said he had to receive counselling after the unprovoked attack. He said he feared meeting the accused as Galway was such a small place but was relieved when he heard he had been taken into custody following the second attack.

Sergeant Paul McNulty told the hearing the second attack on July 3 last occurred while Timothy and his friend were playing Fifa on a PlayStation at a house in Ardilaun Road.

Ambulance personnel found the victim outside the house bleeding from a number of stab wounds to his left arm and upper left shoulder area and back.

He told Gardai that Timothy had fled the scene after stabbing him. The large kitchen knife used in the attack was found in the kitchen sink.

Other youths who were present in the house said a verbal altercation began between the friends while they were sitting on a couch.  Timothy went to the kitchen and returned with the knife.  He lunged at his friend who was still sitting on the couch, stabbing him a number of times. Another friend pulled him off and disarmed him.

Timothy was arrested at his home a short time later but could not be interviewed for four hours due to his intoxication from a cocktail of drugs and alcohol, Sgt McNulty said.

Timothy told Gardai he remembered grabbing the knife and stabbing his friend but he didn’t know why he did it.

Sgt McNulty said the victim did not want to be in court and declined to give a victim impact statement.  He said the young man, who came from Westside but was now living in Dublin, was happy that Timothy had accepted full responsibility for the attack.

Defence barrister, Garry McDonald said his client had been the sole carer for his father and two brothers since the untimely death of his mother three years ago and the stress he had been under drove him to take drink and drugs.

He said the accused needed treatment for his addictions while in custody

Judge Rory McCabe said Timothy had a problem with self-control and anger management and drink and drugs seemed to be a trigger.

He sentenced him to two years in prison for the first assault and imposed a concurrent two-and-a-half-year sentence for the second assault.  He imposed a further concurrent two-year sentence for using the knife and suspended the final 12 months of each sentence for two years on condition Timothy come under the supervision of the probation service on his release.  The sentences were backdated to when Timothy first went into custody last July.

CITY TRIBUNE

City Council’s contempt for the public it serves

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A City Council picture showing an aerial view of work on the new pedestrian bridge. The local authority has not covered itself in glory when it comes to informing the public about road closures to facilitate the project.

Bradley Bytes – A sort of political column by Dara Bradley

Galway City Council appears to just do what it wants when it wants.

Last Friday, it officially closed a road at Newtownsmyth. It will be closed until October 28.

The closure, which was to commence last Friday, September 23, was to facilitate construction works on the new bridge at Salmon Weir for pedestrians and cycling.

It is essential work and the closure is necessary for health and safety purposes.

The City Council, as is only right and proper, advertised the closure in advance, online and in a free-sheet newspaper. So far, so good.

Except, as anyone who knows Newtownsmyth is aware, that road has been closed for weeks and even months prior to the September 23 official closure start date.

Trying to find the City Council’s closure order, and public notice, for closing the road at Newtownsmyth prior to September 23 has proved as difficult as sourcing the Third secret of Fatima.

Requests to City Hall’s communications department to confirm whether the Council had a legitimate closure order prior to September 23 have not shone any light on the subject.

And so, in the absence of an adequate response, is it reasonable to conclude that the Council did not have permission to close Newtownsmyth prior to September 23?

And if that’s the case, can the Council now just go around closing roads willy-nilly, without notice and without allowing input from residents and users of the road?

Maybe it was a mistake. If it was, why not say so? The Galway public is forgiving. Maybe they had gone through proper procedure, but why not just show us the notice if that’s the case?

For too long now, though, City Councillors have been treated with contempt by the unelected executive at City Hall and the suspicion is this closure without notice was just another manifestation of that contempt spreading to the public too.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

City sides will fancy chances of advancing as champions face Corofin

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Bearna's James Kennedy hits the deck in Ballinasloe on Tuesday as Annaghdown's Frankie Burke and Darragh Meehan try to chase down possession. Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

The battle for this year’s county Senior Gaelic football club title looks to be wide open after the quarter-final draw was made this week following the delayed conclusion of the group stages on Tuesday night.

Salthill/Knocknacarra, who finished second in group 2, have been handed a last eight tie with a Tuam Stars side that finished third in group 1; while St Michael’s, who topped Group 3, will face an Annaghdown side that nabbed the final quarter-final spot in dramatic fashion on Tuesday night.

They went into their game with Bearna knowing they needed to win by a minimum of 12points to pip Milltown to the final qualifying spot as the second best of the teams that finished third in the group stages.

They looked to be coming up just short until they were awarded a late free, which goalkeeper James Healy converted, to snatch that remaining quarter-final slot on socring difference form Milltown.

The 2020 champions, Moycullen, will take on Claregalway in the last eight; while the pick of the ties is undoubtedly the clash of defending champions, Mountbellew/Moylough, with a Corofin side that was denied the five-in-a-row by Moycullen two years ago.

At the other end of the equation, St James’ are in a relegation battle, and face a clash with An Spidéal in the preliminary play-offs. A win will secure their senior status for another year, but a defeat will see them join Oughterard, An Cheathru Rua, and the losers of the other preliminary play-off between Caherlistrane and Monivea/Abbey in a round robin league, with the bottom two sides in those play-offs dropping to the intermediate ranks next year.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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CITY TRIBUNE

Play-offs dress rehearsal facing Utd against Treaty

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Former Galway United player Enda Curran celebrates his recent hat-trick for Treaty United in their FAI Cup quarter-final win over UCD. The in-form Mervue native will be facing the Tribesmen in a First Division clash on Friday.

GALWAY United head to Limerick this Friday evening for what is looking like a dress rehearsal for the end-of-season play-offs as they take on Treaty United in the Markets Field (7.45pm).

This is United’s game-in-hand over league leaders, Cork City, and a win will see them close the gap on the Leesiders to four points with three games remaining, and while a win would give the slightest of hopes of a late challenge for league honours, it is more likely to serve as a further boost to confidence ahead of the protracted play-off series that kicks-off at the end of next month.

United need to win their final four games to have any hope of snatching the title, and given the goal difference between the sides, they also need to hope that City don’t pick up more than four points from their last three games, if they are to finish top of the pile.

United’s last three games after this weekend are at home to Athlone, away to Wexford, and home to Longford Town; while City are home to Wexford, away to Athlone, and home to Bray, the easier of the two run-ins, so for United it is all about building momentum ahead of the play-offs.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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