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Connacht Tribune

Ireland as Muse: Emigrant artists to explore impact of place in new exhibit

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Darryl Vance arranging elements for a new painting at his studio in Oranmore.

Galway-based artists Darryl Vance and Fabiano Mulas will present a joint exhibition of recent works at The Courthouse Gallery in Kinvara, County Galway, from

July 4th–15th, 2019. The gallery, home to the Kinvara Area Visual Arts group, will be open daily from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. An opening talk and reception with the artists will launch the show on Thursday July 4th at 8 p.m. All are welcome.

Reflecting the artists’ moves to new surroundings – Mulas from his homeland in Sardinia, Vance from the San Francisco Bay Area – the exhibit, Two Places at Once, features a range of styles, from Mulas’ natural and manmade landscapes, to Vance’s boldly painted arrangements of color, surface and geometry. Their works embody themes of chaos and order, transition and home.

“Whatever I’ve done has always reflected the where and the when, but what has changed about this new work is the experience of being in two places: the place of memory and the place of reality,” Vance said. “And there is the space in between. It’s a type of bardo that I seem to be painting my way through.”

Mulas, a restaurant owner and chef, is converting a large outbuilding at the family’s organic farm in Derrykeel into his art studio. “Coming to Ireland 14 years ago, building our restaurant, Basilico, I’ve gradually managed to build a nest, to give myself the freedom I need to create,” he said. “The farm is my Irish studio. I can breathe there. I can explore all the ways nature works in one place. Then, when you travel, you come back and see different things.”

Vance’s palette reflects dramatic shifts in color and light from the sunny climes of Northern California to the cooler, softer hues of the west of Ireland. “I’m painting oil on cardboard, using boxes that once held all my belongings. When I got a studio in Ireland, I found myself looking at this pile of flattened boxes and pondering what the material meant to me, and what it might mean to anyone else in movement.” Vance is also drawn to the idea of finding logic in apparent chaos. “I don’t knowingly create that logic, but over the course of making a painting, I find my own path through the forest. And since I’ve never thought of the artist as guide or shaman, I hope each viewer can make discoveries of their own.”

The artists, who are friends, share a fine arts background: Mulas is a graduate of Kensington and Chelsea College of Art and Design who earned an honours degree in Painting from Central St. Martin’s in London, and Vance earned a B.F.A. with honours from The Atlanta College of Art.

“I think for artists, it’s about putting yourself into the canvas,” Mulas said. “How can you impact those two dimensions? I’m rebuilding my life to what I want it to be. For me, it’s art, food and nature in one place. And they’re all linked. When I left art school in London and returned to Sardinia, I was drawn to painting derelict buildings. I was unhappy there, and it was only later that I realized these paintings were a reflection of my subconscious state. Now, I want to paint moss growing in tree trunks, study how nature fills in the gaps. Now, I’m painting life.”

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Connacht Tribune

Schools and colleges in Galway advised to close for Storm Barra

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Schools in Galway have begun informing parents that they will not open tomorrow, following advice from the Department of Education.

The Dept said this evening that schools, colleges and universities in areas where a Status Orange or Red warning apply for Storm Barra should not open.

A spokesperson said: “Met Éireann has advised that there is a strong possibility that the status of parts of these counties currently in Status Orange are likely to change and escalate to Status Red.

“Due to the significant nature of Storm Barra, as forecast by Met Éireann and to give sufficient notice to institutions of further and higher education, the department is advising that all universities, colleges and further education facilities covered by the Red Alert and Orange warning from Met Éireann should not open tomorrow, 7 December.

“All schools and third level institutions should keep up-to-date with the current weather warnings which are carried on all national and local news bulletins and in particular any change in the status warning for their area.”

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Connacht Tribune

Galway Gardaí: ‘Stay at home during Storm Barra’

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Gardaí in Galway have warned people to stay home tomorrow (Tuesday) as Met Éireann forecasted a ‘risk to life’ ahead of Storm Barra’s expected landfall tomorrow morning.

At a meeting of the City Joint Policing Committee (JPC), Council Chief Executive Brendan McGrath said the City Council was preparing for the ‘high probability’ of coastal flooding.

A combination of tomorrow’s high tides with the forecast high winds and heavy rainfall would likely lead to a flooding event, he said.

Chief Superintendent Tom Curley said the best advice available was to stay at home but refused to comment on school closures – advising that was a matter for the Department of Education.

Mr McGrath said a number of meetings between local and national agencies had already taken place, with more set to run throughout the day as preparations got underway for this winter’s first severe weather event.

“High tide is at 6.45am tomorrow morning and at 7.20pm tomorrow evening. There is currently a Red Marine Warning in place for the sea area that includes Galway and an Orange Storm Warning for Storm Barra for 6am Tuesday morning to 6am on Wednesday morning,” said Mr McGrath, adding that it was possible this storm warning could be raised to Red later today.

With high tide at 5.45 metres and a forecast storm surge of 1.05m, the risk of flooding was significant. In addition, winds were currently forecast to be South-West to West, said Mr McGrath, conducive to a flooding event in the city.

“It is potentially problematic . . . the hope would be that the storm surge doesn’t happen at the same time as high tide,” he added.

The flood protection barrier had been installed at Spanish Arch over the weekend and storm gullies had been cleaned. Sandbags were to be distributed throughout the day, said Mr McGrath.

Council staff would be on duty throughout the weather event and Gardaí would be operating rolling road closures from early morning. Carparks in Salthill were closed today, while tow trucks were on standby to remove any vehicles not moved by their owners before the high-risk period.

Chief Supt Curley said it was imperative people stayed home where possible.

The best way to say safe was to “leave the bicycle or the car in the driveway” from early tomorrow morning, and to stay indoors until the worst of the storm had passed.

Met Éireann has warned of potential for flooding in the West, with Storm Barra bringing “severe or damaging gusts” of up to 130km/h.

A Status Orange wind warning has been issued for Galway, Clare, Limerick, Kerry and Cork from 6am Tuesday to 6am Wednesday, with southerly winds, later becoming northwesterly, with mean speeds of 65 to 80km/h and gusts of up to 130km/h possibly higher in coastal areas.

“High waves, high tides, heavy rain and storm surge will lead to wave overtopping and a significant possibility of coastal flooding. Disruption to power and travel are likely,” Met Éireann said.

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Connacht Tribune

Storm Barra to bring coastal flooding and disruption to Galway

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Met Éireann has warned of potential for flooding in the West on Tuesday, with Storm Barra bringing “severe or damaging gusts” of up to 130km/h.

A Status Orange wind warning has been issued for Galway, Clare, Limerick, Kerry and Cork from 6am Tuesday to 6am Wednesday, with southerly winds, later becoming northwesterly, with mean speeds of 65 to 80km/h and gusts of up to 130km/h possibly higher in coastal areas.

“High waves, high tides, heavy rain and storm surge will lead to wave overtopping and a significant possibility of coastal flooding. Disruption to power and travel are likely,” Met Éireann said,

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