Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

CITY TRIBUNE

Intriguing premieres at Galway Film Fleadh

Avatar

Published

on

The international premiere of Never Grow Old will be the closing movie of this year’s Galway Film Fleadh, which runs from July 9-14.

Starring Emile Hirsch and John Cusack and shot in Connemara, this fast-paced old-fashioned action movie is set in the California emigrant trail during the 1849 Gold Rush, where anything could happen and loyalty was not guaranteed. Its director Ivan Kavanagh returns to the Fleadh for the screening – his first visit since his 2014 film The Canal.

A Bread Factory, Part One and A Bread Factory, Part Two, is a matched pair of films – which can be seen individually, but are designed to be watched as a double bill.

Directed by Patrick Wang, these indie movies track life- partners Dorothea and Greta who, 40 years previously, had taken over an abandoned bread factory in the sleepy town of Checkford and transformed it into a vibrant arts space. The factory quickly became the heart of their local community, showcasing theatre, dance, music and film.  However, their existence is threatened by a suspicious big business celebrity couple with questionable motives, who arrive in town and construct an enormous competitive arts venue, sucking up funding and audiences overnight.

This double bill stars Tyne Daly (Cagney & Lacey, Spiderman: Homecoming, Judging Amy) and James Marsters (Buffy, the Vampire Slayer).  Its director Patrick Wang will make a welcome return to the Fleadh following the success of his previous features, In the Family and The Grief of Others.
This is a preview only. To read the rest of this article, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. Buy a digital edition of this week’s paper here, or download the app for Android or iPhone.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Drugs raid on house in Ballybane

Enda Cunningham

Published

on

The seizure from the house in Ballybane

Gardaí in Galway have arrested a man and seized more than €31,000 in cash, and suspected cocaine from a house in Ballybane.
At 10pm yesterday, the Divisional Drugs Unit searched a house under warrant, where they seized €12,250 worth of cocaine (pending analysis).
Approximately €19,000 worth of cash in euro and Sterling currency and two designer watches worth €7,000 were also seized by Gardaí.
One man, aged in his early 30s, was arrested at the scene. He has since been released without charge and a file is being prepared for the Director of Public Prosecutions in this matter.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway ICU has 100% Covid-19 survival rate

Dara Bradley

Published

on

Stock image

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – All Covid-19 patients who were critically ill in the Intensive Care Unit at University Hospital Galway have survived the virus, the Galway City Tribune has learned.

While there have been some Covid-19 deaths in the city hospital since the pandemic reached Ireland, the survival rate of those treated in the critical care unit or ICU at UHG has been 100%.

The hospital has not yet provided an exact figure for ICU recoveries, but ‘rolling figures’ from the Health Protection Surveillance Centre – which do not account for overlaps of new ICU patients and those who are moved out following recovery – show that on one occasion at the peak of the crisis here, there were up to 20 people being treated for Covid-19 in the unit. This week, there was one Covid patient in ICU.

The ICU has not been as busy as Dublin’s acute hospitals, as Covid-19 has been more prevalent on the east coast. But the success in treating patients in Galway’s ICU has also been attributed to splitting it into two separate ICUs, one for Covid and one for non-Covid patients, which was facilitated by the deal negotiated with private hospitals.

Dr Pat Nash, Chief Clinical Director of Saolta Hospitals Group, which runs UHG, said: “Thankfully we haven’t had any ICU deaths related to Covid, to date. There have been deaths related to Covid but not in ICU. That is good by national standards.”
This is a shortened preview version of this article. Please remember that without advertising revenue and people buying and subscribing to our newspapers, this website would not exist. You can read the full article by buying a digital edition of this week’s Galway City Tribune HERE.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Galway Market to reopen – and go back to its roots

Denise McNamara

Published

on

All quiet: the last Galway Market held two months ago.

From this wek’s Galway City Tribune – Up to 30 food growers and producers will return this Saturday to sell their wares at a smaller version of the Galway Market, following the easing of Covid-19 restrictions.

A reduced number of stalls will be laid out to allow the two-metre distance between traders and each stall holder will be expected to maintain a ‘socially distant’ queue among their customers. Council officials will be on site to ensure things runs smoothly.

There will be no hot food vendors or craftspeople operating in this phase of the market’s return outside St Nicholas’ Collegiate Church.

Carmel Kilcoyne, Senior Engineer in the Council’s Environment Department, explained that stalls along Churchyard Street will not be erected at this time due to its size.

“It is a different layout and we are adhering to a strict interpretation of what a farmers’ market is – food producers, deli items such as chutneys, cheese, eggs and fish mongers. We will have one coffee van,” she said.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. Please remember that without advertising revenue and people buying and subscribing to our newspapers, this website would not exist. You can read the full article by buying a digital edition of this week’s Galway City Tribune HERE.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending