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CITY TRIBUNE

Insipid United miss chance to move into play-off spots

Keith Kelly

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Galway United’s Carlton Ubaezuonu struggles to keep control of the ball as Ian Turner of Cobh Ramblers loses control of his feet in Eamonn Deacy Park last Friday. Photos: Joe O'Shaughnessy.

Galway United 0

Cobh Ramblers 1

Keith Kelly at Eamonn Deacy Park

Galway United were brought back to earth last Friday night as Cobh Ramblers punished a slack display by the home side to claimed a deserved three points.

Truth be told, when you consider their previous two home performances, this defeat didn’t come as too much of a shock. It was said at the time that the win over Shamrock Rovers’ teenagers was daylight – well, floodlight – robbery; and a better team than Wexford would have punished another flawed display from United the previous week.

Well, Cobh rolled into town last Friday, a better team than Wexford, and duly punished a poor United performance to end John Caulfield’s record-equalling winning start as a United manager. There was only the one goal in it in the end, but make no mistake, the better team on the night took the spoils as United’s shortcomings were exposed time and again.

In fairness, there were mitigating factors: you can’t lose half of the defence that has kept three clean sheets in its previous four games and not expect there to be some collateral damage. Marc Ludden sat out Friday’s defeat through suspension, but will be back soon.

Kevin Farragher, on the other hand, has played his last game for United after moving to England to attend university, and his loss was sorely felt on Friday night. Without the big man beside him, Killian Brouder looked uncertain, and United’s cause really wasn’t helped when Maurice Nugent – who would have replaced Farragher – was ruled out the previous Tuesday due to concussion protocols, meaning Cian Murphy came in alongside Brouder.

Shane Doherty also missed out through injury, resulting in a third change to the side that had beaten Wexford, and the loss of balance and fluidity in the side was evident from the start on Friday.

United had, in recent games, appeared to have solved their long-standing problem of being utterly incapable of defending set-pieces. ‘Ha’, laughed the visitors, remembering the bounty they collected from deadball situations in the St Colman’s Park meeting between the sides back in August, and they reaped another rich harvest on Friday night.

For more, read this week’s Galway City Tribune.

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CITY TRIBUNE

WATCH: The Olivers to the rescue … again!

Enda Cunningham

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Father and son rescue team Patrick and Morgan Oliver were back in action in Salthill this morning, when they helped a swimmer who got into difficulty.

A member of the public raised the alarm at around 10.30am and the Coastguard sought the assistance of Galway Lifeboat who launched from Galway Docks.

Two members of the lifeboat shore crew made their way to the promenade to assist in the rescue.

Patrick and Morgan Oliver were fishing off Salthill at the time and spotted the man taking refuge on Palmers Rock about 200 metres from Salthill shore. They took him on board their fishing boat and brought him back to Galway Docks. Galway Lifeboat in the meantime was stood down. 

The man was taken into the Lifeboat station where he received treatment for symptoms of hypothermia until an ambulance arrived.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Assurances given on progress of road, bridge and bus projects

Francis Farragher

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – It will take time and a lot of money, but the city’s network of major transport projects will proceed on schedule – that was the assurance given this week to councillors by City Council Chief Executive, Brendan McGrath.

Councillors had expressed concerns at their meeting on Monday about the slow rate of progress being made with major capital projects including two new pedestrian bridges over the River Corrib.

However, Brendan McGrath told the meeting that the timelines for the range of capital transport projects – while challenging – were reasonable, pragmatic and achievable.

“All of the projects are moving forward but we must adhere to all the procedures and the different stages that have to be complied with: we have no choice in that,” said Brendan McGrath.

Senior City Council Engineer, Uinsinn Finn, in reply to a number of queries about potential new bus routes, said that while the Council worked closely with Bus Éireann and the bus companies, the local authority didn’t decide on the routes.

Earlier in the meeting, Cllr Peter Keane (FF), asked ‘how it could take 63 months’ to deliver a pedestrian/cycle bridge over the Corrib even though the piers (old Corrib Railway Line) were already in place for the project.

“How can it take over five years to put a bridge like this over the Corrib,” he asked, after hearing that this €11 million Greenways-linked project would not be completed until 2026.

There is a snappier timescale for the Salmon Weir Pedestrian/Cycle Bridge – to be located adjacent to the existing structure on the southern side – with planning consent expected by next Summer and a completion date set for the end of 2022.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Council removes ‘shop local’ signage despite agreement with Latin Quarter

Stephen Corrigan

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – Signage promoting a ‘eat, drink and shop local’ campaign, erected by a local business group, was removed by the Galway City Council – despite an understanding that permission had been granted.

The bilingual signage was placed on a number of solar compactor bins and bollard-control boxes in the city centre by the Latin Quarter business group, in an attempt to promote local businesses grappling with the effects of Covid-19.

A source in the group told the Galway City Tribune that the signage cost around €3,500 and that permission to erect it had been given by a ‘senior Council official’.

The signs were put up in mid-October but only lasted around two weeks when City Hall’s Environment Department had them removed, claiming that they had not been consulted.

“There was clearly a breakdown in communications in City Hall because we had permission from a senior official to proceed, and then the Environment Department took issue with the signs and insisted that they had to be removed,” said the source.

A Council spokesperson said they were currently in discussions with the Latin Quarter to provide promotional material and added “there’s been no falling out here”.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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