Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

A Different View

If you want a job done look for a busy person

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Internationally acclaimed and locally-based sculptor John Behan – here with Aoife Reilly and Neil Johnson of Croi – has crafted a unique bronze piece which is for auction until next Friday, March 11, as part of the annual Croi Gala Ball. This special collector’s item is a signed, once-off piece titled ‘Championship 8’, depicting the crew of and cox of a Galway rowing team. All proceeds go to Croi and anyone interested in placing a bid should contact Aoife Reilly in Croi on 091-544310.

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

There’s an old theory that, if you want a job done, give it to someone who’s already busy – but the other way of looking at this is that you reward slackers by avoiding them because it’s more hassle than it’s worth.

So if you don’t want to be left with responsibility for the garden, for example, then mow through the rose bushes next time you’re asked to cut the grass.

If you would rather than take responsibility for cooking in the kitchen, then burn one meal until every smoke alarm in the house is ringing and you may never be asked to process anything more taxing than toast for the rest of your life.

If you want to dodge the ironing, leave clothes looking like they’ve been crushed into submission by being stuck under the matrass rather than subjected to the undeniable advantages of a steam iron.

As for cleaning the house, some people react like they got a bad fright from a hoover when they were small and are too traumatised to ever approach one again.

So you don’t like doing the washing up – keep letting good plates and glasses slip out of your hands and shatter on the floor.

You don’t like getting stuck with the laundry – throw a woollen jumper in on a long wash at the wrong temperature so that it comes out five sizes smaller, and you’ll be banned from the washing machine faster than a Russian drugs cheat from the Olympics.

You can take this to any level you want – I worked with a guy once who not alone didn’t drive, he refused to ever learn.

And we used to make fun of this perennial passenger because his inability to get behind the wheel meant he wasn’t as free as the rest of us to take to the highways and byways – until he explained his logic.

He hadn’t started out in life intending to become a permanent passenger – but once he’d realised the advantages, Lewis Hamilton couldn’t change his mind.

As a happily married non-driver, there was no debate as to who would drive the kids to school or swimming lessons; no discussion over whose turn it was to stay off the drink at the next social function; no worries over who’d do the next big shop for the weekend.

Only one half of the partnership knew how to drive and the other was happy to sit up front alongside her.

For more read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Connacht Tribune

It’s alright to admit life and work can bore you to tears

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

In all fairness, who hasn’t, on occasion, found their life or their work utterly, mind-numbingly boring? Who wouldn’t have willingly stuck needles in their eyes just to inject a bit of a buzz into the monotony?

Good for you if the answer is ‘not me’ – but for those who admit that they’re sometimes bored out of their trees, meet your new role model; Frenchman Frédéric Desnard, who sued his employers….for being bored.

Not just that – he sued them, and walked away with €50,000 in compensation.

Frédéric worked as a manager at a perfume manufacturer at the Paris-based perfume company Interparfum, but he told the court he had been asked to do between 20 and 40 minutes’ work a day in return for his €80,000 annual salary.

For the other 99.9 per cent of the population, that’s a dream job right there, once you could cope with the smell – but Frédéric knew there was more to life than seven solitary hours a day spent twiddling his thumbs.

The 48-year-old used the word ‘placardiser’ to describe what had happened to him; in literal English that means ‘to be put in a cupboard’ – or ‘to be put aside’.

And where others might have claimed they were suffering from burn-out, Frédéric had been destroyed by extreme ‘bore-out’.

To be fair, Frédéric was a man of rare principle; he told the court he was employed as a manager, but was soon relegated to four years of menial tasks which left him ‘depressed and ashamed’.

He gave the court some examples of the type of ‘boring’ jobs he was given, like configuring the CEO’s tablet and escorting tradesmen at his boss’s home.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Using proper punctuation is not aggressive – full stop

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

In fairness, text messaging was never designed for us oldies; we’re of a time when poor handwriting got you a whack across the knuckles – and woe betide you if you left out the full stop.

It was the late, great Con Houlihan who famously said that a man who could misuse an apostrophe was capable of anything – and he didn’t mean it in a good way.

How he’d hold his head in his hands if he were still around for the world of texting; actually, that’s not a great analogy, because Con had a habit of covering his face with his hands all the time anyway.

But for Con – who never typed and whose handwriting was a spidery scrawl where each A4 page usually fitted no more than three sentences – punctuation was everything.

His halcyon days were in the Evening Press where, by common consensus, his work was so erudite and original that a swathe of readers bought the paper to just enjoy his column alone.

Later on, after the demise of the Press, he moved to the Sunday World and later the Irish Star, where he brought the same scholarly discipline to his every piece.

Con never darkened the door of the Star but instead his column – a raft of loose pages – would be dropped in by hand, then typeset and redelivered to him for proofing and approval.

And if a comma was lost or added, a semi-colon found where he insisted a colon should be, Con would spot it quicker than a cat would spot a mouse – and he’d pounce with even greater speed and purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Turf love provides the smell of the summer on candle front

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

The big seller locally in the world of candles this year doesn’t have essence of lavender or vanilla or eucalyptus infused to its wick to engage your scent. No – this year the scent of choice is that aroma of pure Irish turf.

And for around €12 – or the price of a bag or two of the real stuff – you get a small candle in something the size of an old tobacco tin, which, when lit, radiates the smell of a turf fire.

All of which is wonderful and evocative and a memory of halcyon days at home – or alternatively the very smell that you’ve spent half your life trying to get out of your nostrils.

I’m sure it’s big in America – where actual turf is probably harder to find than gold – or in high-rise apartment blocks where you can marry the scent of the candle with a video of a real fire on your wall-mounted, flat-screen television to give you an artificial yet authentic taste of home.

There was a time when candles just smelled of candles, before they were nothing at all if they weren’t laced with the essence of this, that or the other.

There was a time when candles were almost exclusively for church use, because our forebears had discovered the joys of electric light. And given that rural electrification is still in living memory for some, using candles by night when you had lights burning bright might be seen as lacking a modern outlook.

Of course, everything turns full circle; just as the notion of having exposed floorboards – when you could have Lino – would have once been seen as an indication that you didn’t have the cash to fully furnish your house.

But now, sanded floorboards are back and so too are candles, only now they come with so many scents and smells that you’re either spoiled for choice or tied up in knots.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending