Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

News

Hungry Galway hound swallows barbeque meat – skewer and all

Ciaran Tierney

Published

on

A Galway vet issued a special appeal this week for householders to keep summer party food away from pets after a family’s dog got more than he bargained for when he made off with a skewer from a barbecue.

Ten year old Woody felt poorly for a week and made two visits to the vet before it was discovered that he had eaten the barbecued treat – including a wooden skewer.

The stick perforated Woody’s stomach and then began to make its way out through his rib cage almost a week after he had swallowed it at the family home in Loughrea.

“This dog has a history of eating what he should not be eating,” said Dr Jim Smyth of the Railway Veterinary Clinic this week.

“We have treated him successfully in the past. The family brought him in the previous weekend, but they did not know that he had eaten the kebab or the skewer at that stage. The piece of timber did not show up in an ultrasound scan.”

After the skewer began to come out through Woody’s rib cage late last week, the family got in touch with Dr Smyth again – and he operated on the dog successfully on Sunday morning.

“I did not know what I was going to find when I opened him up,” said Dr Smyth. “The skewer was sticking out of his side. He was not quite himself all last week, but he had not been seriously sick either.

“The family must have got a shock when they saw the skewer protruding from his body. It is amazing what can happen but, thankfully, he didn’t pick up a serious infection. He was able to go home after I kept him in for a few days.”

Dr Smyth said it was clear the family, the Kilraines, did not even know that Woody had helped himself to the kebab the previous weekend – along with the entire wooden skewer.

“After a week, it perforated his stomach and then tried to make its way out through his body wall,” said Dr Smyth. “He needed major surgery to have it removed and was exceptionally lucky that there was no serious damage done.”

See full story in this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Gardaí seek help in locating missing man

Enda Cunningham

Published

on

Gardaí have sought help in locating a man missing in Galway since the end of December.
34-year-old Luke Davoren was last seen in the University Road area on December 30.

He is described as having fair hair, 6ft in height and having an athletic build. He was last seen wearing a grey hoody, brown leather jacket, blue jeans and brown leather boots. He also had a black back pack in his possession.

Gardaí and Luke’s family are very concerned for his welfare and have urged him to make contact.

Anyone with information, particularly any road users with dash cam footage of the Newcastle/University Road areas between 1am – 2am on December 30, is asked to contact Galway Garda Station on 091 538000.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

‘Daredevil’ swimmers are a fatality waiting to happen

Francis Farragher

Published

on

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – ‘Daredevil’ winter sea swimmers who dive or jump into the water in places like Blackrock during adverse weather are putting their own lives at risk – and possibly those of rescuers – by their actions, it was warned this week.

Water Safety Ireland have cautioned that the biggest single contributor to drownings in Ireland is what is known as ‘cold water shock’ – a condition caused by the sudden entry into a cold body of water.

There is now growing concern that a copycat trend is emerging with young people – without wet suits – diving or jumping into the sea in stormy or icy-cold weather.

Several people have been filmed on social media in the sea at Salthill during storms – with a number of them taking ‘running jumps’ off the diving tower at Blackrock.

Roger Sweeney, Deputy CEO of Water Safety Ireland, told the Galway City Tribune that people jumping into the sea during storms showed at best a reckless disregard for their own safety and in a worst-case scenario represented ‘a fatality waiting to happen’ for the jumpers – or the persons trying to rescue them.

“Jumping into cold water puts you at risk of cold shock which can result in immediate incapacitation and doing so in storm conditions can make it difficult to get back out of the water safely and promptly before hypothermia sets in.

“Hypothermia leads to the cooling of the muscles needed in the arms and legs to stay afloat. Drownings typically happen when someone over-estimates their ability and under-estimates the risks,” said Mr Sweeney.

Galway Lifeboat Operations Manager, Mike Swan, told the Galway City Tribune, that the key thing for all people who enjoyed the water and the sea was to carefully plan their exercise or hobby.

“Cold water shock is a real danger at this time of year for all swimmers. Be prepared – have your cap, ear plugs, mats, woolly cap [after leaving the water] and towels all in place. Check the weather forecast and check the tides – and never, ever just jump straight into the water during the colder season.”

(Photo: Diving into the water at Blackrock during Storm Bella in December)
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

CITY TRIBUNE

Developer banks on boom in rental property market

Enda Cunningham

Published

on

From this week’s Galway City Tribune – The backer of the Crown Square scheme in Mervue is planning an increase in the number of apartments in the development following a review of the economic viability of the project.

The 345 apartments will specifically target the rental market.

Crown Square Developments Ltd, which is operated by developer Padraic Rhatigan, has told Galway City Council that the amended plans will form part of a new planning application to be made directly to An Bord Pleanála under ‘Strategic Housing Development’ legislation.

According to the company, the property market has changed since it was granted permission in November 2019 for 288 apartments in three blocks ranging from five to eight storeys in height.

Mr Rhatigan has now sought planning permission for an 18% reduction in the overall size of basement levels and a reduction in car parking from 1,377 to 1,012 spaces. Cycle parking spaces will increase from 1,110 to 1,200.

The plan also involves the relocation of the vehicular and pedestrian access to the development on the Monivea Road, which will now be closer to McDonagh Avenue. The existing planned access is at the south-easternmost point of the site, but is now planned to move further west.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending