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Humble consolations of never being a star

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Country Living with Francis Farragher

It’ll come as no great surprise to the masses that I’ve decided to rule myself out of all future US presidential elections, after much soul searching and deliberation.

A series of slightly eccentric medical complaints down through the years would have held me up to ridicule among my peers, while a nagging old cough – that probably won’t kill me, but won’t go away either – would certainly scuttle my chances of making it to the Oval Office.

It sure is one serious bit of business to be elected as President of the United States, and I’d say, apart from God Himself, no citizen of human frailty could pass all the health tests and trawls of past deeds from birth to old age.

Probably the most bizarre defence of all as regards having a puff of marijuana came from Bill Clinton when he said that while he had ‘experimented’ with the drug for a time in his college days, he hadn’t inhaled. Now Bill, you didn’t really expect us to believe that one.

Already I’d have to admit taking a drag of some rolled up weed in the Cellar Bar back in the late 1970s but for the life of me, I cannot recall getting any kind of kick out of it, other than the usual splutter of a cough.

So if I was a Bill Clinton, my excuse would be that while I did experiment once or twice with something that might have been cannabis, I got no enjoyment whatsoever from it. That should be okay with the American tabloids.

I don’t think though that I’d have to confess to two shots of ‘something’ that I got after a knee cartilage clean-out a few years back in one of the local hospitals.

Whatever it was, it sure was brilliant, as for the following four hours or so, I fell totally in love with the world and wouldn’t hear a bad word said about anyone.

The temptation was there to get the second knee done on the spot . . . but the feeling passed, even if the memory does linger on.

Possibly that could rule me out of the US presidential race, as I certainly ‘enjoyed to the last’ the little substance that entered by system, but I’ve decided to drop its pursuit in light of further enquiries.

A medical guru told me ‘to forget about that stuff’ as, in all probability, the next time I’d be getting a shot of it, the angels and their entourage would be waiting in the next room. So down with that kind of thing . . . but like the small pig, it was nice while it lasted.

Read Francis Farragher’s column in full in this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

Connacht Tribune

Those who thought St Thomas’ on the decline had better think again

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Gary Lally of Padraig Pearses and Ardrahan's Oisin Slevin tussling for possession during Saturday's Senior B championship clash at Kenny Park. Photo: David Cunniffe.

Inside Track with John McIntyre

THERE was loose talk, idle talk and mad talk in Ballinasloe last Saturday. As word filtered through that St Thomas’ were ten points behind Clarinbridge at Kenny Park, the general presumption was that the county champions were really a force in serious amd sudden decline.

Coming on the back of a heavy group loss to Turloughmore in the previous round, it was easy to jump to the conclusion that St Thomas’ were something of a busted flush, but that judgement was a doing a gross and premature disservice to a group of hurlers who have repeatedly done their parish proud over the past decade.

The easy thing for St Thomas’; would have been to accept their seemingly inevitable defeat and to try and regroup for the knockout stages, especially as they were missing towering defender Fintan Burke. But this was the moment when their pride was challenged and how Conor Cooney and company responded in achieving a 4-20 to 4-17 victory.

Second-half goals from Victor Manso, Bernard Burke, Cooney and Darragh Burke saw them emulate last year’s final victory over a Clarinbridge team which must be bitterly disappointed at failing to close the deal. They had looked in control thanks to green flags from TJ Brennan, Mike Daly and Seán Kilduff, but have now failed to win any of their last three championship games.

At Duggan Park around the same time, Turloughmore’s grandstand finish came up just short against Sarsfields. For long periods, they were a team going nowhere, but once they caught fire you could see why they had beaten St Thomas’. Put their 17 wides into the equation, this one-point loss was no disaster.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Problems with calves and other bizarre sports injuries

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Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

One of the Armenian players to suffer heartbreak against Ireland recently nearly didn’t make it to Lansdowne Road at all because, according to the commentator, he ‘had a problem with a calf’.

And you immediately thought it was one of those romantic sporting stories where the plucky part-timers and massive underdogs have postmen and milkmen and farmers in their ranks.

Then you copped on and realised it was not so much a farm animal that was bothering him as the rear of his leg.

Because the last time a fella missed a match over a problem with an actual calf was probably a Junior B clash on West Clare, a county where they once famously – according to Marty Morrissey anyway – failed to milk a cow for a week after a Munster Football Final win.

We’re all experts on sporting injuries these days – from David Beckham’s broken metatarsal in the run-up to the 2002 World Cup through to Wayne Rooney’s similarly bad break four years later when he suffered a fracture of the fourth Metatarsal as well as one of the Tarsal bones of the foot.

You’d have thought those bones went out with the dinosaurs.

There was a time when a mere broken foot wouldn’t have kept a footballer out of action; think about to the German-born Manchester City goalkeeper of the distant past, Bert Trautmann, who once won the FA Cup after playing most of the game with an actual broken neck.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

At least KamaKwasi didn’t fall over children’s shoes!

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Kwasi Kwarteng... momentous week for all the wrong reasons.

World of Politics with Harry McGee

KamaKwasi; as headlines go it was, well ‘puntastic’ – a clever play on the name of Kwasi Kwarteng, the British chancellor of the Exchequer.  Last week, Kwarteng announced a mini-budget, with some very generous (verging on reckless) spending measures announced, including a cap on energy bills which some commentators believe is like writing a blank cheque.

The measure that caused furore, though, was a cut to the top rate of tax from 45 per cent to 40. They went down like a lead balloon among the public.

Those that would benefit from it were the richest people in Britain, those earning six figure salaries each year. It would be worth an extra £50,000 a year to someone earning £1 million, in other words somebody who did not really need it.

“We are in the beginning of a new era,” he announced on the day of the mini-budget. The new era lasted little over a week.

The pound began to plummet and markets got jittery. With fears being voiced of a run on the pound, the Bank of England intervened to shore up sterling to the tune of £65 billion. That’s a big wad of cash in anybody’s language.

In the run-up to the Tory party conference in Birmingham at the weekend, Kwarteng and the British Prime Minister Liz Truss stuck by their guns.

On Sunday morning she was interviewed by the BBC and said there would be no reverse on the tax cut. The most interesting part of it was that she disclosed that it was Kwarteng himself who came up with the plan. In other words, she was in denial mode.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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