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CITY TRIBUNE

History repeating in centenary commemorations controversy

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Bradley Bytes – a sort of political column with Dara Bradley

History has a habit of repeating itself. And when it comes to commemorating centenaries, Official Ireland – and Official Galway – doesn’t learn from past mistakes.

In 2016, there was uproar locally over CIÉ’s refusal to return a plaque, which celebrates local 1916 Easter Rising hero, Éamonn Ceannt, to the façade of the wall outside the city centre train station that’s named after him.

And who could forget the furore over Galway County Council’s plans to commemorate Patrick Whelan? He was Galway’s only 1916 Rising fatality; he was also a member of the Royal Irish Constabulary, and so you could see how only celebrating a policeman who was shot and killed by Irish Volunteers, might be controversial.

In 2020, the then Mayor of Galway, Mike Cubbard, took a stand to boycott the planned national commemoration for RIC men and Dublin Metropolitan Police who died during the War of Independence.

Have we learned from these incidents? Have we heck!

On Saturday, the Crane Bar off Sea Road, played host to The Irish War of Independence Galway Centenary Conference, timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of when the truce was signed. Organised by military historian, Damien Quinn, it heard from 12 speakers, all experts in different aspects of that period in our history.

It was the sort of event Galway City Council could and should have proudly supported but didn’t.

Some individual councillors supported it. Mayor of Galway, Cllr Colette Connolly (Ind) launched it. Fianna Fáil councillor John Connolly was one of the speakers and gave an account of ‘The killing of Father Griffin’. Labour Councillor Niall McNelis also spoke and introduced the conference . . . he even donated €200 to cover some costs.

But the City Council Executive ignored it; the local authority gave no money and no other form of support.

In total, it cost about €700; much of this involved making a ‘digital book’ from recordings of the contributions. The Council ignored repeated requests for support, including a first approach in February.

We’re told that the City Council, in conjunction with the Galway City Creative Ireland Team, including the Council’s Heritage Officer, Jim Higgins, has developed the Decade of Centenaries programme. But unlike many other local authorities, they didn’t use an Open Call process to invite ideas from the public and community groups.

Our shared history belongs to the people, and yet City Hall, in its wisdom, excluded people from decisions on how and what was going to be commemorated. Will they continue to ignore the public for the upcoming Civil War centenary?

(Photo: Mayor of Galway, Colette Connolly, with Mick Crehan of the Crane Bar, military historian Damien Quinn, and Councillor Niall McNelis ahead of last weekend’s War of Independence conference. Galway City Council did not support it).
This is a shortened preview version of Bradley Bytes. To read more, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

CITY TRIBUNE

Mercury hit 30°C for Galway City’s hottest day in 45 years

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –

Wednesday was the hottest day in the city over the past 45 years when with a high of 30.1 Celsius being recorded at the NUI Galway Weather Station.

The highest temperature ever recorded in the city dates back to June 30, 1976, when the late Frank Gaffney had a reading of 30.5° Celsius at his weather station in Newcastle.

Pharmacists and doctors have reported a surge in people seeking treatment for sunburn.

A Status Yellow ‘high temperature warning’ from Met Éireann – issued on Tuesday – remains in place for Galway and the rest of the country until 9am on Saturday morning.

It will be even hotter in the North Midlands, where a Status Orange temperature warning is in place.

One of the more uncomfortable aspects of our current heatwave has been the above average night-time temperatures and the high humidity levels – presenting sleeping difficulties for a lot of people.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Property Tax hike voted down in Galway City

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A proposal to boost Galway City Council coffers by half a million euro every year by increasing Local Property Tax (LPT) did not receive the support of city councillors.

Councillor Peter Keane (FF) failed to get a seconder at this week’s local authority meeting for his motion to increase the LPT payable on Galway City houses by 5%.

Cllr Keane said that the increase would net the Council €500,000 every year, which could be spent evenly on services across all three electoral wards.

It would be used to fund services and projects city councillors are always looking for, including a proposal by his colleague Cllr Imelda Byrne for the local authority to hire additional staff for city parks.

The cost to the taxpayer – or property owner – would be minimal, he insisted.

“It would mean that 90% of households would pay 37 cent extra per week,” he said.

Not one of the 17 other elected members, including four party colleagues, would second his motion and so it fell.

Another motion recommending no change in the current rate of LPT in 2022 was passed by a majority.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council needs 40 more workers to help deliver on projects

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –  Forty more workers are needed at City Hall ‘right away’, the Chief Executive of Galway City Council has said.

Brendan McGrath has warned city councillors that the local authority is understaffed and it needs to hire more staff immediately to deliver its plans and projects.

The total cost of the extra 40 workers, including salary, would be between €1.75 million and €1.95 million.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council had a workforce now that was below what it had in 2007, but the city’s population has grown and so too had the services the Council provides.

The population of Galway City grew by almost 11% in the 10 years to 2016, he said, and total staff numbers in the Council fell by 13.6% during that period.

Though more staff were hired in recent years, Mr McGrath said that the Council was at 2007 and 2008 staffing levels, even though the Census will record further increases in population since 2016.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council now provides 1,000 services across a range of departments, far more than during the 2000s.

He said that currently, 524 staff are employed at the City Council. This equated to 493 Whole Time Equivalents when part-time workers such as school wardens and Town Hall workers are included.

Mr McGrath said that 12% of all staff are in acting up positions, with many more in short-term or fixed-term contracts. There was a highly competitive jobs market and the Council was finding recruitment and retention of specialist staff difficult.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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