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God question a piece of cake compared to conundrums of Irish political landscape!

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World of Politics with Harry McGee – harrymcgee@gmail.com

We were driving home from Dublin city centre last week when my three-and-a-half year old daughter Sadhbh hit me with a haymaker: “Daddy, who made God?” she asked.

For a person who’s never short of a word, I was completely stumped. It was a question for which I had no answer, at least none that would make sense to a three-year old.

It got me to thinking of the questions for which there are no easy answers in Irish politics. And a few of those came to mind over the course of the weekend.

An obvious one is why there was no rioting in the streets after the country lost control of its sovereignty? Another is why no far-right party or anti-immigrant party has emerged over the past decade?

The third is why, despite all the travails, two parties look set to continue their dominance of Irish politics into the future?

The questions are all tricky and have no conclusive or satisfactorily complete answers but at least – unlike the question my daughter fired at me – I believe I am suitably qualified to have at least a shot at them.

That said, I think the answers to all three questions are inter-connected and related. They are also complex and, in some instances, contradictory.

For a start, I’m completely unconvinced there is any basis to this notion that the Irish are rebellious as a people. Indeed, the evidence is to the contrary. As a society, we are conformist.

The QED for that, in my experience, is the smoking ban which was introduced a decade ago. It was widely predicted that the ban would be observed more in its defiance than in its observance. The opposite was the case.

Indeed so wholesale was the acceptance that within weeks it became clear that any plans to reverse the policy would probably meet with civil unrest.

The net point being made is that Irish society is not rebellious – indeed it is a very compliant society. You will get the odd cowboy everywhere but the level of compliance to the rules laid down (from paying taxes, to obeying the rules of the road, to following the instructions of Garda officers) is extraordinarily high.

Part of the reason for this is that Ireland is a small and cohesive society. Another part of the explanation is that we have a very settled democracy – indeed one of the longest continuous democracies in the world.

Another is the coherent nature of Irish politics – while Irish people whinge continuously about the quality of our politicians, they are not remote figures (unlike Brussels bureaucrats) and are easily accessible.

When politicians make unpopular and harsh policy choices, there is evidence that citizens might not like the policies (especially if they dent their pockets) but accept them on the pragmatic basis that they are necessary, that no section of society is being unduly hammered or favoured, and that the decisions are for the betterment of society.

To give it to you in shorthand, Ireland has probably more of a North European temperament than a Mediterranean one.

It always struck me as pointless comparing Ireland to Greece, where the tax compliance rates are shockingly low, where democracy is a relatively recent phenomenon, and whose debt situation was markedly more drastic than it was in Ireland.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Greens set the bar high on seats for next local elections

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Eamon Ryan...brave ambitions.

World of Politics with Harry McGee

There we all were thinking the Greens were going to repeat what happened a decade ago and lose most, or all, of their seats in the next election. But then Eamon Ryan told the party’s annual convention last weekend that he wanted the party to grow and increase seats.

He even put a target on it – to double its number of council seats from 50 to 100 at the next local elections in 2024.

It’s a brave claim and there will be some that say the only target we see is the one on Eamon Ryan’s back.

We all know the fate of smaller parties in government in Ireland. And none should know it better than the Greens. They won six seats in 2007 and lost them all in 2011.

Of course, there were extenuating circumstances. They were unlucky enough to be tacked onto a Fianna Fáil party which had pumped up the economy to bulbous levels in the decade before they went into coalition together.

The only party to buck the trend for a smaller party coming out of coalition was the Progressive Democrats in 2002. However, that was only a reprieve; they were s annihilated in the following election in 2007.

Ryan’s argument is that there is always a percentage of the population who will back Green first and it is growing. That is true. But the reality is it’s not ten per cent of the population yet – it is closer to five. And that five per cent is concentrated in middle class urban areas.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Connacht Tribune

Only sure thing in politics is nothing stays the same

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Galway in the 1950’s – how different is this to today.

World of Politics with Harry McGee

In less than a month’s time we will witness a first in Irish politics – the first instance of a Government which rotates its Taoiseach half way through the term.

It was due to happen on December 15, but it has been pushed back to allow Micheál Martin have his last hurrah – a final Summit in Brussels.

Then Leo Varakdar will come back for his second go – and if the Government lasts a full term, Varadkar’s two stints in the job will use about amount to one full term of five years.

It’s not the first time that a shared Taoiseach has been floated. Dick Spring suggested it to John Bruton in 1994. There was talk of Eamon Gilmore doing it with Enda Kenny before the 2011 general election. Enda Kenny suggested it to Micheál Martin in 2016.

Now it’s happened and I’m sure it won’t be the last time we will see it in the Irish political context – because the political landscape has altered irrevocably.

A majority of voters in Ireland identified with one tribe or another during most of the 20th century. Memories of the revolution and civil war were still fresh. The parties both represented different sections of society (although there were big swatches of common ground). Ireland was rural, isolated, Catholic, conservative. Even in the 1980s, the two big parties still pulled 80 per cent plus of the vote.

We have a WhatsApp group from my class in the Jes in the 1980s. One of the lads recently posted an aerial photography of Galway taken in the the late 1950s. The city of Galway was nothing more than small town.

Shantalla was a new estate on the far outskirts. There was no Cathedral. Taylor’s Hill was hitting open countryside once you got past St Mary’s Terrace. There were open fields leading from Sea Road down to the shore.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Connacht Tribune

Tackling shadowy spectre of gambling at long last

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Salthill's entertainment hot spot of the 1960s and 70s, Seapoint.

World of Politics with Harry McGee

The Salthill seafront was about a ten-minute walk from where we lived in Glenard when I was growing up. I can’t remember exactly when I started going to the amusement arcades but I was probably about 14.

At the time there were three or four along the so-called Golden Mile – Salthill Amusements near Western House; Claude Tofts casino in the middle of the drag, and the Silver Dollar, which was just before you turned for the Sacre Coeur Hotel. And then there was Seapoint.

The main attractions for us initially were the snooker tables upstairs in Salthill amusements, the roller disco on the Silver Dollar, and the teenage discos in the Captain’s Deck in Leisureland.

Mostly it was playing the video games – Space Invaders; Asteroids and Pacman. Yet no matter how absorbed you were with the games  you could not help noticing the other half of the arcade.

On that side there were battalions of one-armed bandits and poker machines. This was the early 1980s and I think it was about 10p a go. I think if you got one cherry on the right you won about 20p, and the amount of winnings went up especially if you got three bars in a row.

I’m not saying I never gambled on those machines. I did, although not too often. I remember having one big payout – I think it might have been £20. I was able to buy a ticket for the Dexy’s Midnight Runners concert in Seapoint.

It was July. Gino was actually number one in the charts that very week and all the Northerners were down in Salthill to escape the Orange marches.

We hung around the amusements a bit as teenagers. After a while, you began to recognise the regulars, the daily penitents. They would come in every afternoon and evening and spend hours sitting on a high school with a bucket of coins beside them, playing either the one-armed bandits or the poker machines.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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