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Connacht Tribune

Galway’s black Bank Holiday claims six lives

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A WEEKEND of harrowing tragedies in the greater Galway area over the Whit Weekend has left several families and communities grieving with six lives lost.

The Moycullen area was in a state of shock following the death of a local woman on Sunday afternoon last after she was attacked by two dogs.

Mrs. Theresa McDonagh (64) from Knockarasser, Moycullen, died after being attacked by two Bulmastiff dogs in the backgarden of her son’s house at Knockarasser.

Emergency services were called after the alarm was raised but the woman was pronounced dead at the scene – both dogs were shot dead by a neighbour who arrived at the tragedy.

The late Mrs. McDonagh will be laid to rest in Moycullen Cemetery in Moycullen later today (Thursday) after Requiem Mass in the local Church of the Immaculate Conception at 12 noon.

Meanwhile a horror single vehicle crash near Tourmakeady in Mayo in the early hours of Sunday morning last claimed the lives of a 20-year-old man from Clonbur and a 20-year-old woman from Tourmakeady.

Sean Halloran from Ballynonagh, Clonbur, was killed in the accident while another passenger in the car – Orla O’Malley from Cordroon, Cross, Co. Mayo – died on Monday at Castlebar General Hospital, as a result of injuries suffered in the crash.

There was also great sadness in the Salthill area of Galway and Frenchpark, Roscommon, at the sudden passing of well-known auctioneer and estate agent, Oisín Allman (42), who died suddenly after falling ill at the wheel of his car on Saturday last.

He was rushed by ambulance from the M6 motorway close to Athlone to Portiuncula Hospital but was pronounced dead there later. A front seat passenger in the car was hospitalised but released later.

On Sunday evening last, a 28-year-old man died after being rescued from the Corrib earlier that day.

Meanwhile the body of a man found near Palmer’s Rock in Salthill has been named locally as Martin Mullen from Inverin. He is understood to be in his mid-50s and had only been missing for a short time.

See full story in this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune

Schools and colleges in Galway advised to close for Storm Barra

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Schools in Galway have begun informing parents that they will not open tomorrow, following advice from the Department of Education.

The Dept said this evening that schools, colleges and universities in areas where a Status Orange or Red warning apply for Storm Barra should not open.

A spokesperson said: “Met Éireann has advised that there is a strong possibility that the status of parts of these counties currently in Status Orange are likely to change and escalate to Status Red.

“Due to the significant nature of Storm Barra, as forecast by Met Éireann and to give sufficient notice to institutions of further and higher education, the department is advising that all universities, colleges and further education facilities covered by the Red Alert and Orange warning from Met Éireann should not open tomorrow, 7 December.

“All schools and third level institutions should keep up-to-date with the current weather warnings which are carried on all national and local news bulletins and in particular any change in the status warning for their area.”

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Connacht Tribune

Galway Gardaí: ‘Stay at home during Storm Barra’

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Gardaí in Galway have warned people to stay home tomorrow (Tuesday) as Met Éireann forecasted a ‘risk to life’ ahead of Storm Barra’s expected landfall tomorrow morning.

At a meeting of the City Joint Policing Committee (JPC), Council Chief Executive Brendan McGrath said the City Council was preparing for the ‘high probability’ of coastal flooding.

A combination of tomorrow’s high tides with the forecast high winds and heavy rainfall would likely lead to a flooding event, he said.

Chief Superintendent Tom Curley said the best advice available was to stay at home but refused to comment on school closures – advising that was a matter for the Department of Education.

Mr McGrath said a number of meetings between local and national agencies had already taken place, with more set to run throughout the day as preparations got underway for this winter’s first severe weather event.

“High tide is at 6.45am tomorrow morning and at 7.20pm tomorrow evening. There is currently a Red Marine Warning in place for the sea area that includes Galway and an Orange Storm Warning for Storm Barra for 6am Tuesday morning to 6am on Wednesday morning,” said Mr McGrath, adding that it was possible this storm warning could be raised to Red later today.

With high tide at 5.45 metres and a forecast storm surge of 1.05m, the risk of flooding was significant. In addition, winds were currently forecast to be South-West to West, said Mr McGrath, conducive to a flooding event in the city.

“It is potentially problematic . . . the hope would be that the storm surge doesn’t happen at the same time as high tide,” he added.

The flood protection barrier had been installed at Spanish Arch over the weekend and storm gullies had been cleaned. Sandbags were to be distributed throughout the day, said Mr McGrath.

Council staff would be on duty throughout the weather event and Gardaí would be operating rolling road closures from early morning. Carparks in Salthill were closed today, while tow trucks were on standby to remove any vehicles not moved by their owners before the high-risk period.

Chief Supt Curley said it was imperative people stayed home where possible.

The best way to say safe was to “leave the bicycle or the car in the driveway” from early tomorrow morning, and to stay indoors until the worst of the storm had passed.

Met Éireann has warned of potential for flooding in the West, with Storm Barra bringing “severe or damaging gusts” of up to 130km/h.

A Status Orange wind warning has been issued for Galway, Clare, Limerick, Kerry and Cork from 6am Tuesday to 6am Wednesday, with southerly winds, later becoming northwesterly, with mean speeds of 65 to 80km/h and gusts of up to 130km/h possibly higher in coastal areas.

“High waves, high tides, heavy rain and storm surge will lead to wave overtopping and a significant possibility of coastal flooding. Disruption to power and travel are likely,” Met Éireann said.

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Connacht Tribune

Storm Barra to bring coastal flooding and disruption to Galway

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Met Éireann has warned of potential for flooding in the West on Tuesday, with Storm Barra bringing “severe or damaging gusts” of up to 130km/h.

A Status Orange wind warning has been issued for Galway, Clare, Limerick, Kerry and Cork from 6am Tuesday to 6am Wednesday, with southerly winds, later becoming northwesterly, with mean speeds of 65 to 80km/h and gusts of up to 130km/h possibly higher in coastal areas.

“High waves, high tides, heavy rain and storm surge will lead to wave overtopping and a significant possibility of coastal flooding. Disruption to power and travel are likely,” Met Éireann said,

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