Classifieds Advertise Archive Subscriptions Family Announcements Photos Digital Editions/Apps
Connect with us

Connacht Tribune

Galway work acclaimed at Engineers Ireland awards

Avatar

Published

on

A Galway engineer behind a host of the country’s best known modern bridge developments has been acclaimed for his body of work at the annual Engineers Ireland Excellence Awards.

Murt Coleman won the President’s Award, which is presented to an engineer who has shown exceptional leadership skills in the advancement of engineering and society through their contribution to the industry and the profession.

His engineering career has spanned four decades at Irishenco, overseeing major civil engineering projects.

Some of his flagship projects include the award-winning Westlink Bridge, Eastlink Bridge, two of the five bridges over the river Liffey, the Mizen Head Bridge and the University of Limerick Bridge over the Shannon.

And he wasn’t the only Galway connection on the night, because NUIG graduate and army captain Eoghan Carton won the prestigious Chartered Engineer of the Year Award for his work on the changeover of combat engineering, infrastructure and utilities from Finland to Ireland as part of UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon).

Captain Carton currently works as an instructor in the School of Military Engineering where he is responsible for providing training in key skills including bridge construction, explosives, engineer specialist search & clearance (ESSC) and chemical, biological, radiological & nuclear (CBRN) defence.

And NUIG Professor William Gerard Hurley won the Best Presentation Award for his Challenges and Trends in Magnetics for Power Electronics project.  Professor Hurley is Professor of Electrical Engineering at NUIG and a Director of the Power Electronics Research Centre.

There was further recognition for Galway engineering, with the Aran Islands subsea cable repair project, undertaken by ESB International and commissioned by ESB Networks, runner-up in the flagship ‘Engineering Project of the Year’ category.

The redevelopment of Páirc Uí Chaoimh was voted outright national winner in this flagship category.

The regenerated stadium now features a floodlit bowl-shaped venue that can accommodate a capacity of 45,300 and up to 47,000 for games and concerts respectively, including 21,300 seats.

The winners were announced at a special ceremony held in Dublin

Connacht Tribune

Still waters help those conversations run deep

Dave O'Connell

Published

on

Dave O'Connell

A Different View with Dave O’Connell

hose of a certain vintage will know Bob Mortimer as one half of Reeves and Mortimer, and we’ll remember Paul Whitehouse from the Fast Show – but these days these great old friends are more likely to be found by a river bank.

Because together they’ve created a little gem on BBC Two; Mortimer and Whitehouse: Gone Fishing is brilliant in its simplicity – just two old boys casting a line and putting the world to rights.

The genesis for this came after Mortimer suffered a heart attack and set about changing his lifestyle. His old pal, Whitehouse, was an angler from boyhood – so he offered to take him out and show him the magic of Britain’s rivers and lakes.

In return, Mortimer scouted out suitable accommodation and served up the evening meal – as well as a series of dad jokes to brighten the long days by the river banks.

The science to it is that they go in search of a different breed of fish each week and Paul explains why they are prevalent in those particular parts – but mainly this is just gentle banter between two old pals, growing older and more philosophical as the years go by.

Which is what makes it compulsive viewing.

Take this recent pronouncement from Bob Mortimer on what we might call the male menopause.

“I used to have a big large flame inside me that wanted to go out and explore the world and grab every opportunity – a roaring fire of ambition,” he says.

“But now my fire inside me is so small that, if I take it outside, the rain or the wind will extinguish it. So I hide in my house with my little flame protected by my four walls.”

And you think – that might well be the best description of the passing of years you’ll ever hear.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Connacht Tribune

Turloughmore primed to bridge 35-year title gap

Avatar

Published

on

Turloughmore’s Daithi Burke battles for possession with David Burke of St Thomas in the final group game of last year's championship, which finished 0-8 apiece. The potential match-up between the two DBs will be an intriguing one this Sunday.

By Patrick Earley

After going four months without pucking a competitive ball from March to July, the club campaign finally got up and running, and given the uncertainty of that period where players were left to their own devices in many respects during lockdown, this year’s championship had the making’s of the year of the underdog with the potential for any amount of twists and turns.

But here we are three months later left with just two, the big two in many people’s eyes as three-in-a-row chasing St Thomas’ get set to face-off with a Turloughmore side who have finally reached county final day after so many years of disappointment, in Kenny Park on Sunday (throw-in 2pm).

There have been plenty of upsets, late smash-and-grab victories and shock exits along the way, but for St Thomas’ and Turloughmore, it’s been business as usual with Turlough finally coming of age and looking like the team we all believed they could be; and St Thomas’ looking every bit like the champions we know they are, scintillating and ruthless on some occasions, but gutsy and brave in equal measure when the chips have been down in some games.

So where does the advantage lie heading into the weekend? Is there such thing as champions’ advantage? Of course there is and St Thomas’ experience on the big day and the 100% record they boast with four victories from four attempts is worth a lot, but is it outweighed by Turlough’s greater recovery time between games and all-round preparations?

Both camps are in the middle of a very different week’s preparations ahead of Sunday’s meeting. For St Thomas’, who came through a bruising battle with Cappataggle by a single point only last Sunday, it’s all about trying to get the same 15 players plus subs back to Kenny Park in one piece and primed to go again.

Turloughmore have that all taken care of and have been training away with the sole focus on St Thomas’ and getting their own performance right to bring a first Tom Callinan Cup home in 35 years – that’s worth a lot.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

Continue Reading

Country Living

Avoid the supreme fallacy and eke out some lighter moments

Francis Farragher

Published

on

Trying to eke out some brighter moments.

Country Living with Francis Farragher

LAST Thursday night about half-way through the nine-o-clock, I just had enough. It could just have been fatigue from that word that I will refrain from mentioning in this column but it’s the one which has dominated our lives since we had to call off our plans for a few pints on St. Patrick’s Day.

The first alternative on the RTE Player, now loaded onto my iPhone (haven’t we really gotten modern over recent years) was an episode of Fr. Ted on RTE 2, and for the best part of 20 minutes it transported me into a little cocoon of mirth and laughter.

Three Bishops had made the visit to Craggy Island to upgrade the Holy Stone of Clonrichert to a ‘Class Two Relic’ with Fr. Ted on tenterhooks to ensure that Dougal and Jack behaved themselves in an impeccable manner during the visit.

Needless to say, as in all things Fr. Ted, the strategy did not go according to plan. Fr. Jack, despite being on a drip-feed of whiskey and told to repeat the famous line of: “That would be an ecumenical matter,” gets fed up of being poked enthusiastically by Bishop Facks and stuffs the Holy Stone up the rear end of his guest.

Fr. Dougal, aka Ardal O’Hanlon, convinces Bishop O’Neill that the whole religion racket is a fake prompting the second visitor to Craggy Island to join a hippy cult while an even worse fate awaits the most elderly of the visiting clerics, Bishop Jordan. When Fr. Ted flushes the faulty toilets; the waste water erupts into a gulley underneath the Bishop; and he dies of a heart attack.

In the end the three Bishops depart the island: one of them in a box carried out by the local undertaker; the second in an ambulance to have the Holy Stone removed from his rear end; and the third in a colourful VW minibus with a gang of hippies.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

Continue Reading

Local Ads

Advertisement

Weather

Weather Icon
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Trending