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Galway United throw in the towel as relegation play-off looms

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Date Published: 14-Oct-2010

Keith Kelly

GALWAY United manager Sean Connor is expected to use tonight’s game with Sporting Fingal in the Morton Stadium (kick-off 7.45pm), and next Friday home game with Bohemians, as an opportunity to rest some of his more established players in preparation for the relegation play-off with Bray Wanderers on Tuesday, November 2.

United can still avoid that play-off as they are seven points behind UCD with three games remaining, but a realistic Connor has admitted that he is already planning for that one-off game with Bray Wanderers in a bid to retain the club’s Premier Division status.

“The problems we are having now is what you get when you have a small squad. Realistically we are playing with an average First Division budget, I always knew we had difficulties coming around the corner as I could see the suspensions mounting up.

“If you take two players out of my team, that is a catastrophe–- [if] Pat Fenlon has a problem up front, he plays Jason Byrne, Raffael Cretaro, Paddy Madden, Mark Quigley or Aaron Greene. I have one recognised striker, Karl Sheppard, and he is suffering with confidence.

“My only hope is we can have our best team in the park when we go away to Drogheda to get a win to take into the play-off with Bray, and I’ll give the young lads a run in the next two games and protect my better players for Drogheda and Bray,” said Connor.

Barry Ryan is suspended for tonight’s game; both Karl Sheppard and Stephen Walshe will miss the game with Bohemians through suspension; while Stephen O’Donnell will miss both games after having surgery on a knee injury this week.

For United to avoid the play-off, they will need to win their remaining three league games, as UCD have a far superior goal difference (-1 as opposed to United’s -20), but given the fact United haven’t strung a run of three wins together in a season since the 2006 First Division campaign, Connor is perhaps wise to focus on a clash four games away.

Sporting Fingal are still in the hunt for third in the league, which would bring qualification for European football next season, and they will be confident of making it 10 points from a possible 12 against United this season.

Sports News Archive

Portumna in a different class to bitter rivals

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Date Published: {J}

MOYCULLEN MAN APPEARS IN COURT OVER ALLEGED CITY ATTACK

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Sports News Archive

Galwegians get back to winning ways with six try rout of Students

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Date Published: {J}

Galwegians 38

UCD 17

Galwegians got back to winning ways with a comprehensive six-try demolition of UCD in cracking match at Crowley Park on Saturday.

 

‘Wegians came into this game lying in second from bottom, and a win was vital to get their league campaign back on track, and they opened the scoring in the 12th minute when two graduates of their own underage system combined, with out-half Tadhg Leader feeding no 8 Eoin McKeon who made a fine break.

McKeon was stopped just short of the line, but he managed to off-load to Leader to score the opening try, which he duly converted for a 7-0 lead.

The danger from the visitors clearly came from their free-running backline, and they levelled matters in the 18th minute when full-back Michael Twomey sliced through the cover to score a try, which was well converted by out-half Niall Earls to level the game.

It got better for the Students when they took the lead on 25 minutes. ‘Wegians were punished when a long lineout throw in their own 22 went crooked in the strong breeze, and following quick clean scrum ball, UCD flanker Richie Bent took a pop pass to crash over near the posts, with Earls again converting for a 14-7 lead.

However the home side responded well and they completely dominated the remainder of the half, and just before the half-hour mark an excellent break by young winger Matthew Dever set up an attack, which was finished off several phases later by scrum-half Dave Moore who sniped over near the line.

Leader’s conversion levelled the game for a second time, and the hosts deservedly regained the lead just before the break. It followed an excellent cross-kick deep into touch from Leader’s younger brother Darragh, who made a very impressive debut at full-back.

‘Wegians won possession on the Students’ lineout, and several phases later it was older brother Tadhg who got in for his second and his side’s third try in the right-hand corner, leaving it 19-14 at half-time.

The Students thought they had levelled the contest once again at the start of the second-half when referee Simon McDowell awarded another try to full-back Twomey following the opening passage of play, but it was overruled as the touch-judge had seen a tackle in the air on ‘Wegians captain for the day Brian McClearn at the restart.

 

For more, read this week’s Connacht Sentinel.

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Sports News Archive

November 20, 2009

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Date Published: {J}

An extraordinary attack was made on the house of Mr. Berty Powell, assistant county surveyor, in Athenry last Friday night, About midnight loud knocking was heard at the front door and this was followed by kicking at the door and a man put his foot through the door and broke glass in the panels.

The windows on the ground floor were then broken – nine panes in four or five windows having been smashed.

The following morning, an Athenry man was taken before Mr. Stephen Ruane P.C. at a special court and charged in connection with the attack.

Paths problems

The residents of Mountbellew are about to petition the County Council to have the paths of the town repaired. Since the opening of the roads for the laying of pipes in connection with the sewerage schemes, the paths in some places have fallen under the road level and in wet weather, the water remains on the surface. The path leading to the Church, Convent and Monastery is also in very bad repair.

Slums menace

The relationship between housing and public health was stressed at a recent meeting of the County Galway Board of Health when the insanitary conditions in Ballinasloe were put forward as the main grounds for sustaining a petition by the people of Ballinasloe for a district hospital in the town.

It was stated that doctors were often called to see patients living in conditions in which even the most elementary principles of hygiene or comfort were absent.

About £13,000 was due by patients for treatment at the Galway Central Hospital.

No small portion of that was due by patients who could have been treated in their own homes if the surroundings were such as to enable the doctors to work effectually.

Fire tragedy

As a result of falling into a fire while her mother was fetching water from a barrel outside the door, a three year old from Derrygimla, Clifden, received burns which resulted in her tragic death at Galway Central Hospital.

Dr. Casey, Clifden, who was sent for, came at once, and having done all he could ordered the child to be sent to Galway to hospital where she died shortly after admittance.

1959

Sheep invasion from the North

The cattle invasion from over the Border has greatly diminished, but the invasion of sheep and lambs had markedly increased, especially since the sheep and lamb prices slumped in the North and Britain.

Victuallers are feeling the effects in loss of trade. Lambs imported from the North have particularly depressed trade in the West, where dressed lamb is being offered at prices so low that one would have to go back many years to find a parallel.

Urgent needs

To meet the increasing demand for a water and sewerage scheme to serve the urban area of Ballinasloe, both of which were urgent, would cost £68,000, the Council was told by their engineer. This would mean an additional 2/11 in the £ on the rates – this year 47/9 in the £.

In detailing the need for an extension to the water plant, Mr O’Connor, Town Engineer, said it was urgent. In the past eight years, demand for water went up 40 per cent.

Free houses

Tenants on the Scanlon Estate, Dunlo Hill, Ballinasloe, are anxious to purchase their houses from the trustees of the state, and are negotiating to do so. These seven houses were offered ‘free’ to the local Council by the owner, a Miss Scanlon, at present in the U.S.A., but the Urban Council refused to accept the offer.

Pub talk

How men in a public house at Ballymore put Fianna Fáil in and out of office and then did the same with Fine Gael with the result that the time passed until the Gardaí ‘caught’ them, was told the District Justice Loftus at Williamstown Court, when a Ballymoe publican was summonsed for a breach of the licensing laws at 1.40am on 16th June last.

 

Defence said it was the night of the Presidential Election and the men began discussing politics and put Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael into and out of office. In fact, the breach might be said to be caused by the Government having too many elections.

Shanty towns

Referring to “misunderstandings” with regard to recent statements made at Galway Chamber of Commerce in connection with “shanty towns” around Galway City, Mr. J. Lydon, president, said that he wished to make it clear that the members only wanted to control “unsightliness”, and that all types of holidaymakers were welcome to the city.

1984

Car tax strike over potholes

A ‘golden’ half-mile of road between Galway and Moycullen on which £500,000 has been spent over five years has sparked off a car tax strike threat from angry motorists.

For though half a million pounds has been spent by Galway County Council, the stretch is known among motorists as ‘the corrugated road’ because it is unfinished and potholed.

Frequent users of the road have reacted by threatening to withhold road tax payments.

Residents’ fears

People living in Corrib Park in the city have threatened to block a newly-built roundabout near their estate to prevent it being brought into use in a row over the safety of their children.

They plan to form a human chain on the roadway to prevent traffic from using the partially-completed roundabout, built as part of the approach network to the new bridge planned to cross the Corrib between Newcastle and Terryland.

Bus attacks

CIE may withdraw its bus service at night from a number of Galway City estates following a series of incidents in which drivers have been attacked and windscreens smashed by stone-throwing youths.

There have been at least four incidents over the past six months in which buses travelling through Inishannagh Park have been attacked with stones, while there have been numerous incidents in which the drivers of the one-man buses have been abused.

New trains

The most recent and up-to-date CIE train, the Inter-City Mark III, has passed its first week in operation – running from Galway to Dublin four times a week – with flying colours.

It is now faster to travel to Dublin by Inter-City than it ever was before. The Mark III is capable of doing a maximum speed of 95 miles per hour, compared to 72mph on the older trains.

However, it is at present impossible for the Mark III to do its maximum speed as the track running between Galway and Dublin would not be capable of holding it.

Signpost plea

A demand has been made for proper signposting and safety measures at unprotected piers in Connemara – it came following the deaths of three brothers who drowned when they lost their way in dense fog and their car plunged into the sea at Caladh Thadhg.

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