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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway students prototype drone may prove a lifesaver

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A Galway student’s prototype of a ‘quadcopter for rapid response cardiac arrest rescue’ has won him the top Engineers Ireland West Project Award at the inaugural GMIT Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Expo.

The winning project from Max Phelan of Oranmore was among 45 submitted and exhibited in the GMIT Café Foyer from April 25 to May 2.

The Overall Mechanical winner, his project was titled “The Mechanical Design and Manufacture of a Cost Effective Autonomous Drone for Rapid Cardiac Response Purposes”.

Max explains: “Auton-omous drones are used for both callous and humanitarian purposes. The aim of this project is to design and manufacture a prototype autonomous drone to rapidly deliver an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) for use in high density population areas.

“To realise this, I looked at the flight envelopes of existing drones to asses and critique their abilities, and thereafter used flight dynamics, aerodynamics, control and programming to design and manufacture a prototype quadcopter which is capable of delivering a concept AED for rapid response purposes.”

A ‘domestic drying space using a heat recovery ventilation system’ won Philip Doyle, from Ballyglunin, Tuam, the Overall Energy award.

His project was titled “Investigation, Specification and Design of a Domestic Dedicated Drying System using ProAir’s Heat Recovery Ventilation System”.

Philip says: “Homes are ventilated for many reasons, but primarily to provide a clean fresh air supply.

“In Ireland due to our Maritime climate many modern homes use a dedicated Mechanical Heat Recovery system. The aim of the project was therefore to investigate the feasibility of using a mechanical heat recovery ventilation system to preheat the incoming air in a dedicated clothes drying space. To realise this, I used ProAir’s Mechanical Ventilation system to preheat to investigate its efficacy in cloths drying in a dedicated area”.

The inaugural competition was judged by industry experts Alan Heneghan, Senior Programme Manager, Thermo King, Donal Collins, R&D Manager, McHale, Brian Dowling, Project Engineer, Medtronic, and John Paul Butler, Chairman of Engineers Ireland West Region, sponsor of the student awards.

John Paul Butler, Chairman of Engineers Ireland in the West Region, said: “I was really impressed with the range of projects. They were well structured and superbly presented. They demonstrated how the students’ competencies had developed to deliver projects relevant to industry to a high standard.”

Dr Oliver Mulryan, Chair of the Mechanical Engineering Programme, and Expo organiser, said: “It’s humbling and empowering to see our students grow, as demonstrated by the confident way they interacted with industry.

“We hope to run the competition on an annual basis to proudly promulgate to all, our student’s capabilities. Small events like this greatly enhance our students’ college experience and assist in fostering and fortifying links with industry.”

CITY TRIBUNE

Mercury hit 30°C for Galway City’s hottest day in 45 years

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –

Wednesday was the hottest day in the city over the past 45 years when with a high of 30.1 Celsius being recorded at the NUI Galway Weather Station.

The highest temperature ever recorded in the city dates back to June 30, 1976, when the late Frank Gaffney had a reading of 30.5° Celsius at his weather station in Newcastle.

Pharmacists and doctors have reported a surge in people seeking treatment for sunburn.

A Status Yellow ‘high temperature warning’ from Met Éireann – issued on Tuesday – remains in place for Galway and the rest of the country until 9am on Saturday morning.

It will be even hotter in the North Midlands, where a Status Orange temperature warning is in place.

One of the more uncomfortable aspects of our current heatwave has been the above average night-time temperatures and the high humidity levels – presenting sleeping difficulties for a lot of people.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Property Tax hike voted down in Galway City

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune – A proposal to boost Galway City Council coffers by half a million euro every year by increasing Local Property Tax (LPT) did not receive the support of city councillors.

Councillor Peter Keane (FF) failed to get a seconder at this week’s local authority meeting for his motion to increase the LPT payable on Galway City houses by 5%.

Cllr Keane said that the increase would net the Council €500,000 every year, which could be spent evenly on services across all three electoral wards.

It would be used to fund services and projects city councillors are always looking for, including a proposal by his colleague Cllr Imelda Byrne for the local authority to hire additional staff for city parks.

The cost to the taxpayer – or property owner – would be minimal, he insisted.

“It would mean that 90% of households would pay 37 cent extra per week,” he said.

Not one of the 17 other elected members, including four party colleagues, would second his motion and so it fell.

Another motion recommending no change in the current rate of LPT in 2022 was passed by a majority.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway City Council needs 40 more workers to help deliver on projects

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From this week’s Galway City Tribune –  Forty more workers are needed at City Hall ‘right away’, the Chief Executive of Galway City Council has said.

Brendan McGrath has warned city councillors that the local authority is understaffed and it needs to hire more staff immediately to deliver its plans and projects.

The total cost of the extra 40 workers, including salary, would be between €1.75 million and €1.95 million.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council had a workforce now that was below what it had in 2007, but the city’s population has grown and so too had the services the Council provides.

The population of Galway City grew by almost 11% in the 10 years to 2016, he said, and total staff numbers in the Council fell by 13.6% during that period.

Though more staff were hired in recent years, Mr McGrath said that the Council was at 2007 and 2008 staffing levels, even though the Census will record further increases in population since 2016.

Mr McGrath said that the City Council now provides 1,000 services across a range of departments, far more than during the 2000s.

He said that currently, 524 staff are employed at the City Council. This equated to 493 Whole Time Equivalents when part-time workers such as school wardens and Town Hall workers are included.

Mr McGrath said that 12% of all staff are in acting up positions, with many more in short-term or fixed-term contracts. There was a highly competitive jobs market and the Council was finding recruitment and retention of specialist staff difficult.
This is a shortened preview version of this article. To read the rest of the story, see this week’s Galway City Tribune. You can buy a digital edition HERE.

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