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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1914

Volunteers’ parade

The historic town of Loughrea was en fete on Sunday, when a meeting was held to speed on the Volunteer movement which had been inaugurated there during the previous week.

Prior to the meeting, a parade of the Volunteers was held, in which between three and four hundred participated. Their steady marching and admirable discipline created a most favourable impression, and reflects the highest credit on their instructions. After the parade, the meeting was held outside the Temperance Hall, and a very large and enthusiastic crowd was present.

Mr. Farrell, T.C., having been moved to the chair, received a hearty ovation, which showed in a marked manner the regard with which the few survivors of the Fenian movement area held.

He said that his heart was bursting with pride at that day’s magnificent demonstration. He remembered the time when, if men met for drill and parade, as the Volunteers were now doing, they would be arrested and put in jail.

The Volunteers would see that such a time would never come again. The Volunteers would prove to Sir Edward Carson and his Orange followers that no four counties would be allowed to stand in the way of freedom for the Irish nation (loud cheers).

Mr. Geo. Nicholls, B.A., Solr., said the Volunteers were not formed to fight Carson and the Ulster Volunteers, and would not do so unless Carson deliberately provoked the rest of Ireland.

The promoters of the Irish Volunteers wanted to unite all Irishmen in a great national army. Grattan’s Volunteers, having won independence, made the fatal mistake of thinking that their work was accomplished, and they disbanded.

The result was, that through bribery and corruption, the liberty they had won was filched from the Irish nation and Ireland was again like a corpse on the dissecting table.

1939

Garda outwits Romanies

The quiet little town of Clifden, was afforded an unusual and most exciting spectacle on Thursday, when a member of the local Gardaí was seen running helter-skelter through the streets, followed by an angry band of ferocious-looking Romanies.

The Garda ran into the barracks with seven stalwart gipsy-men close on his heels. The barrack door closed promptly as the last of the pursuers entered, and a crowd of townspeople who had gathered outside had mental visions of the building going up in smoke.

Angry voices were heard from within the barrack for some time; then there was a lull, and shortly afterwards the pursued Garda appeared at the door politely showing the “visitors” out.

The Romanies were heard to mutter strange maledictions as they strolled sulkily and slowly back to the encampment at the end of the town.

Later, a “Connacht Tribune” reporter learned the cause of the commotion. It appears that some weeks ago a band of the Romanies were fined in their absence at a district court in Mayo for assaulting the Guards.

Apparently determined not to pay the fine, the band drew reinforcements from three other bands, and the combined “army” consisting of about a score of hefty men and several women and children moved over the border into Connemara where they could easily outnumber the Gardaí garrison in any individual sub-district.

When they arrived in Clifden, however, and pitched an “armed camp” in the local fairgreen, Garda Peter O’Halloran got a brain-wave.

Realising that it would be courting disaster to attempt to arrest them in their stronghold, he decided on a strategy. On seeing one of the band cash an army pension voucher for £3 in the local post office, the Garda trailed him to his camp.

Approaching the Romany, he asked him if he were an ex-soldier and if it rightly belonged to him. The Romany became indignant, and producing his credentials with a flourish, held them under the Garda’s nose.

The Garda promptly snatched then and, turning on his heel, ran for dear life. When they entered the barrack in their wild pursuit of the offending Garda, they were surprised to find the whole station party awaiting them with batons drawn. Seeing that they were trapped, they soon realised that there was no alternative but to pay up their little account to society.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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