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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1914

Volunteers’ parade

The historic town of Loughrea was en fete on Sunday, when a meeting was held to speed on the Volunteer movement which had been inaugurated there during the previous week.

Prior to the meeting, a parade of the Volunteers was held, in which between three and four hundred participated. Their steady marching and admirable discipline created a most favourable impression, and reflects the highest credit on their instructions. After the parade, the meeting was held outside the Temperance Hall, and a very large and enthusiastic crowd was present.

Mr. Farrell, T.C., having been moved to the chair, received a hearty ovation, which showed in a marked manner the regard with which the few survivors of the Fenian movement area held.

He said that his heart was bursting with pride at that day’s magnificent demonstration. He remembered the time when, if men met for drill and parade, as the Volunteers were now doing, they would be arrested and put in jail.

The Volunteers would see that such a time would never come again. The Volunteers would prove to Sir Edward Carson and his Orange followers that no four counties would be allowed to stand in the way of freedom for the Irish nation (loud cheers).

Mr. Geo. Nicholls, B.A., Solr., said the Volunteers were not formed to fight Carson and the Ulster Volunteers, and would not do so unless Carson deliberately provoked the rest of Ireland.

The promoters of the Irish Volunteers wanted to unite all Irishmen in a great national army. Grattan’s Volunteers, having won independence, made the fatal mistake of thinking that their work was accomplished, and they disbanded.

The result was, that through bribery and corruption, the liberty they had won was filched from the Irish nation and Ireland was again like a corpse on the dissecting table.

1939

Garda outwits Romanies

The quiet little town of Clifden, was afforded an unusual and most exciting spectacle on Thursday, when a member of the local Gardaí was seen running helter-skelter through the streets, followed by an angry band of ferocious-looking Romanies.

The Garda ran into the barracks with seven stalwart gipsy-men close on his heels. The barrack door closed promptly as the last of the pursuers entered, and a crowd of townspeople who had gathered outside had mental visions of the building going up in smoke.

Angry voices were heard from within the barrack for some time; then there was a lull, and shortly afterwards the pursued Garda appeared at the door politely showing the “visitors” out.

The Romanies were heard to mutter strange maledictions as they strolled sulkily and slowly back to the encampment at the end of the town.

Later, a “Connacht Tribune” reporter learned the cause of the commotion. It appears that some weeks ago a band of the Romanies were fined in their absence at a district court in Mayo for assaulting the Guards.

Apparently determined not to pay the fine, the band drew reinforcements from three other bands, and the combined “army” consisting of about a score of hefty men and several women and children moved over the border into Connemara where they could easily outnumber the Gardaí garrison in any individual sub-district.

When they arrived in Clifden, however, and pitched an “armed camp” in the local fairgreen, Garda Peter O’Halloran got a brain-wave.

Realising that it would be courting disaster to attempt to arrest them in their stronghold, he decided on a strategy. On seeing one of the band cash an army pension voucher for £3 in the local post office, the Garda trailed him to his camp.

Approaching the Romany, he asked him if he were an ex-soldier and if it rightly belonged to him. The Romany became indignant, and producing his credentials with a flourish, held them under the Garda’s nose.

The Garda promptly snatched then and, turning on his heel, ran for dear life. When they entered the barrack in their wild pursuit of the offending Garda, they were surprised to find the whole station party awaiting them with batons drawn. Seeing that they were trapped, they soon realised that there was no alternative but to pay up their little account to society.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A man lies on a bed of nails at the opening of Galway Shopping Centre, Headford Road, on October 26, 1972

1921

Silence is golden

Leaders on both sides have stated that the best assistance the country can give in the making of peace is to keep silence.

During the past week there has been a great deal of speculation, most of it harmless enough, as, for instance, the enterprising American journalist’s “exclusive” on the first meeting of the British Premier and the President of the Irish Republic; much of it positively mischievous, as the case of the efforts of a certain journal, which has grown hoary in the reputation for throwing in the apple of discord, to anticipate failure in advance.

Our American colleague was on surer and on safer ground when he told of how de Valera and Lloyd George met.

“Mr. Lloyd George,” he cabled, “was sitting at his desk when the Irish President entered. For just a minute these two gazed fixedly at one another. Then the British Premier walked across the intervening space and shook de Valera by the hand. He led him to a seat where they sat side by side. The atmosphere was tense. They faced one another. Then Lloyd George reached down for a box of cigars. But the Irish President is of Spartan mould. He neither permits himself to drink nor smoke. He politely but firmly waved the box away. Mr. Lloyd George, however, selected and lighted a Havana, and as the smoke curled upwards the atmosphere became decidedly easier!”

Good planning

The wise and practical man always lays by a store against the time when supplies will be scarce. One of the most serious effects of the prolonged drought is the scarcity of supplies of fodder for cattle-feeding during the coming winter and spring.

The hay crop is not more than half the average yield. The corn crop is far below normal. Turnips in many districts are a partial failure. We have frequently emphasised the importance of growing catch-crops to supplement other feeding stuffs raised on the farm, but it is only under circumstances such as the present that their utility is brought home to farmers. Owing to the early harvest, a larger area than is usual can and should be put down this season. This would make good, to some extent, at least, the shortage of hay and other feeding-stuffs.

The demonstration plots laid down by the County Committee of Agriculture have shown that catch-crops, such as vetches and rye as well as other mixtures, can be successfully grown in all parts of County Galway.

We would urge on farmers the desirability – nay, the necessity – of procuring seed and making early preparation for the sowing of an increased area of catch-crops this season.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Children dancing at the Clonbur Festival on July 5, 1980. An article in the Tribune at the time detailed how this was the fourth such festival with events covering set dancing, figure dancing, art, fishing and an old-time waltz competition.

1921

Peace at last

Hope “hath happy place” in this land of ours to-day. Those who disappoint it are the enemies not only of Ireland, but of civilisation. Before proceeding to the preliminary conference with Mr. Lloyd George at 10, Downing-street, yesterday afternoon, Mr. de Valera said that he thought the outlook for peace both from the British and Irish points of view was better than it had ever been in history.

The Irish leader would not make this statement unless he had good grounds for it. We may accept it as the confident prediction of one who has proceeded with extreme caution throughout these momentous negotiations.

Yet patient confidence in ultimate justice and patient endurance for a little are needed. There are those who would, if they could, thwart the coming of peace, but they will be borne aside by the widening will to peace, and the larger outlook that the coming of the Truce has brought.

The agony of these days that are past, as we hope for ever, is like a nightmare. Only last week, the pages of the “Tribune” told of the trials and tribulations through which the mothers and sisters of County Galway had gone. The stories related at the Quarter Sessions afforded some index of the hell of ceaseless apprehension and the dread which the women and children have had to bear for many months.

It would seem as if there could be no requital for their sorrows upon this earth. But there is sometimes a balance of justice in human affairs. To-day, as Ireland hopes and prays, this balance is about to be meted out as a common national inheritance.

The Truce has been observed in the spirit of mutual forbearance, good-will and generosity. One can conceive that the horrible conditions of the past nine months will ever be recalled. Indeed, there is no person who would desire or contrive at such an eventuality. Its very contemplation makes us fearful of the outcome of these fateful conferences.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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CITY TRIBUNE

Galway In Days Gone By

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A section of the crowd in the stand before the start of a race at the Galway Races at Ballybrit in July 1965. Organisers of the festival this year are awaiting confirmation that there will be a return of similar scenes in two week's time with plans to allow 5,000 punters in under eased Covid restrictions.

1921

Theft in Renmore

At about eleven o’clock on Saturday morning two employees of Miss Behan, carrier and forwarding agent, Galway, delivering a quantity of groceries, cigarettes, etc., at the Army and Navy Stores, Renmore, were held up at the turn of the road leading into Renmore by six men who had come down from the Oranmore road.

The drivers were requested to stop the horses, and this being done, two members of the party searched the cars minutely. One of the two who had searched the cars took away a box of containing a quantity of cigarettes to the value of £30.

The drivers reported the matter on arrival at the military barracks and subsequently investigations were made but without success.

Death in pavilion blaze

Set ablaze early on Friday morning last, the pavilion at Athenry tennis and cricket ground was destroyed. Half buried in the debris on the morning following were found the charred remains of a human being.

Shortly after midnight many of the inhabitants of Athenry were awakened by the lurid flames from the north side of the town which shone all over the place. After some time, the local R.I.C. visited the place and found the pavilion had been almost gutted and gone beyond any hope of salvage.

They, however, succeeded in removing a quantity of the wool which the caretaker, Mr. P. Doherty, had stored in an adjoining shed. Delph, costly cutlery, linens and furniture to the value of £100 were reduced to ashes, as were also two sets of harness and a small sum of money, the property of the caretaker.

When the place ceased smouldering on the following day the charred remains of a human being rendered unrecognisable by the flames were found in the cellar.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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