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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

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1914

Connemara Land War

The Connemara cattle driving prisoners, Messrs. P.J. Wallace, P. McLoughlin, A. McDonnell, John Lacey, D.C., Pat Heanue and Martin Faherty, who were released on Friday morning last from Galway jail, received a memorable welcome home.

That Connemara appreciated their self-sacrifice and suffering for the cause of ‘The Land for the People’, was made evident in no uncertain manner by the romping welcome they received from a huge concourse of people when the 4.30pm train steamed into Clifden station on Friday evening.

As soon as the train was seen slowly making her way into the station, a mighty cheer was raised, which was continued until the train drew up alongside the platform, and everyone rushed forward. The carriage door was thrown open, and the cattledrivers were seen sitting smiling inside.

The cheering was deafening, and before one could be aware of what was happening, the prisoners were raised high over the crowd and borne aloft on stalwart shoulders, and placed on a brake which was waiting outside.

The horses were unyoked from the brake, and a score of stout young men pulled it out from the platform, and along the streets followed by the band playing and the great procession of people cheering lustily.

Gruesome find

A shocking discovery was made on Monday afternoon at Newcastle, situate about three quarters of a mile outside Galway, when the body of an infant was found in a box buried in a field. A man named James Kelly was attracted by the conditions of a freshly dug up patch of ground, and on kicking away the earth, he found a box in which was the body of an infant neatly dressed. The condition of the body would go to show that the child had died within 24 hours of its birth.

1939

 Refusal for cottages loan

In a letter to the Galway County Board of Health, the Minister for Local Government and Public Health referred to the proposal of the Board to raise a loan of $105,000 for the acquisition of lands and the building of 300 labourers’ cottages in the county; and stated that owing to insufficient evidence of the need for the cottages being submitted, he should withhold sanction.

Children on tour

One hundred and twenty persons, including two unaccompanied children aged nine and seven from Tuam, embarked on the Cunard White Star liner, Scythia, on her first outward bound-trip of the season from Galway on Sunday morning.

Many of those who embarked at Galway port were girls making their first trip to America. Fifty-five sacks of mails were put on board.

Fatal accident

Three motor accidents, one of which had fatal results, occurred near Galway on Wednesday. The fatal accident occurred at about 7 p.m. at Merlin Par, when Thomas Cummins, a farmer of Derrydonnell, Oranmore, who was travelling home from Galway, received terrible injuries when, it appears, his Baby Ford car ran up on the embankment near the railway bridge and overturned.

Mr. Cummins was thrown from his car to the other side of the road, where he was found lying in an unconscious state by Capt. Waithman, who reported the matter to the Gardaí at Eglinton-street.

A car on the top of which a coffin was tied and stated to be driven by Joseph Bannerton, Ahascragh, came into collision with another car alleged to have been driven by Christopher Daly, Westport, at about 4 p.m. near the electric power station at Bohermore, Galway.

Both cars were badly damaged, but the occupants luckily escaped with slight injuries.

A delivery van stated to be the property of McCambridge and Co., Shop-street, Galway, and driven by Michael O’Neill struck a young child near Whitehall. The child escaped with a slight cut on the arm.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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