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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

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1914

Bailiff ‘dipped’

The unpleasant experiences of a water bailiff named John Rooney were mentioned at Oranmore Petty Sessions on Tuesday when Peter Duggan (Heavey), Thomas Duggan and Mary Duggan, were charged with allegedly beating and throwing complainant into the river near Oranmore.

In opening the case, Mr. Daly, who appeared for the complainant, said the assault was rather a serious one.

Peter Duggan, one of the defendants, asked to have the case adjourned, as summonses were received late.

Mr. Daly: The alleged assault took place on the 26th February, and I find the summonses were only issued on the 2nd March. Mr. St. George, C.P.S., said the summonses were only applied for on Saturday, the 28th February.

Mr. Daly: My client was confined to bed as a result of the assault. These men knocked him down, kicked him, and threw him into the river as you would a dead rat. The sergeant of the district was called upon to see this man and can describe the condition he was in. In fact, they did not want to murder him by blows, but to suffocate him in the water.

Chairman (to Peter Duggan): What do you want an adjournment for?

Defendant: I had a few witnesses.

Chairman: That you did not commit the assault?

Defendant: Yes, but I came in later on.

Chairman: What do you suggest the witnesses would prove, that you never beat Rooney?

Defendant: Yes.

It was agreed to adjourn.

Mr. Daly asked the injured man to step forward and show the marks on his neck. Mr. Daly also reminded the Bench that he had a black eye.

Chairman: Oh, we are not a coroner’s jury. We have not come to that … yet (laughter).

Mr. Daly: There is an Act brought in which transfers that duty to resident magistrates (laughter). My client is a water bailiff, and the other men, I believe, are poachers, which circumstance explains the attack made on him.

1939

Island isolated

When a young man from Galway quarrelled with a party of friends with whom he was touring Connemara on Sunday, he probably never foresaw all the trouble he was to give the Gardaí of Gort, Recess and Maam.

`Leaving his friends’ car beyond Maam Cross, this young man walked off “in a huff” towards Clifden at a late hour on Sunday night.

His friends, thinking that he would soon “cool off” waited for his return, but hours passed and he did not come back. The party then became alarmed and drove to Recess garda station, where they reported the matter.

The Recess Gardaí got in touch immediately with Gortmore and Maam and a wholesale search of the three sub-districts was instituted at about 2a.m. on Monday morning.

The search continued until late on Monday. Lake shores in the area were carefully patrolled in search of the man’s clothing or perhaps a farewell message. It was when excitement was at its height that a phone message from Galway brought anti-climax by stating that the man had been at home in Galway since early on Monday morning.

It appears that shortly after parting with his friends he met another party who gave him a seat hack to Galway. The Gardai declined to give the name of the young man to a “Connacht Tribune” reporter.

Amusements nuisance

By five votes to three, Galway Corporation at a meeting in the City Hall, decided to terminate Mr. A. Toft’s lease of Salthill Park and not to allow his amusements fair or any other amusements fair to enter the park this summer.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the West of Ireland Bridge Congress at UCG in April 1983 were Phil Carey, Newcastle, Eileen Murphy, Taylor's Hill, Carmel Howard, Cross Street and Claire Burke, Salthill. This year’s Bridge Congress is taking place next week at the Ardilaun Hotel from February 3 to February 5.

1923

Islanders’ distress

A correspondent sends authentic particulars of distress prevailing in the Islands of Aran. There is extreme poverty in Inishmore, especially in Killeany; large numbers in the village are on the verge of starvation, kept alive by the charity of neighbours, with scarcely a healthy child amongst them.

The people own no land, notwithstanding that the Congested Districts Board has a large tract; they fish and labour when the former is profitable or practicable and when the work can be found. To-day they are without either.

Similar stories come from other island villages. Yet last October Mr. Blythe stated in the Dáil that £1,000 had been granted for the relief of distress on the islands. The money was placed at the disposal of the Galway Rural District Council, which refused to have anything to do with the scheme.

Accordingly, the grant was never made. It is alleged that the inhabitants of Inishmore have refused to pay rates, but islanders state in reply that rates were not collected for some two years, nor were demand notes issued. The whole position is so grave that it should be looked into without further delay, and we understand that all the circumstances have been referred to Deputy O’Connell for this purpose.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Students Yvonne O’Byrne, Edel Comer, Janice Butler, Orla Casserley, Lisa Small, Sinéad Irvine, Emer Burke, Alva McManus and Ciara Hanley who took part in the Dominican College, Taylor's Hill, production of the musical 'My Fair Lady' at the Rosary Hall in January 1998.

1923

Narrow escape

A party of four men, who arrived in the village in a motor-car, engaged in a murderous attack on the barracks occupied by the unarmed Civic Guard at Ahascragh, Ballinasloe, about three a.m. on Wednesday.

Shots and bombs were fired through the windows, and some of the sleeping guards had narrow escapes from bullets, and subsequently had to dash through the petrol-inspired flames for safety.

The village is a peaceable one, and the Guards have recently been carrying out their work in it with quiet efficiency. During the recent warfare, there had been no disturbance in the neighbourhood.

The Guards retired as usual on Tuesday night, and about three a.m. on Wednesday morning they were awakened by the crash of rifles.

A moment later flames sprang up, and it was seen that the barracks had been sprinkled with petrol and fired. Bombs were first fired through the windows, then petrol was thrown in, and the place was set on fire.

The small body of four Guards found themselves compelled to seek shelter from the bullets, and then they had to make a dash to escape the flames that were springing up around them.

Sergeant Rodgers had an exceedingly narrow escape, a bullet grazing his head. Guard Grimes was sleeping beneath a window when it was broken and petrol thrown over his head.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Taking part in the Coláiste Iognáid production of A Tale of Two Cities in the Jesuit Hall, Sea Road, in February1998 were Cathal Cunningham, Michael Roche and Richard Curtin.

1923

Education is key

This week or the beginning of next, Irish boys and girls return to school. On the work that they do there during the succeeding years will largely depend the future of Ireland, for as the plant is bent, so shall the tree become.

Judged by the present day standard of ethics and conduct, something has been sadly lacking in the spiritual and secular training of the past.

Recently, a controversy – if it could be dignified with the name – has been running in the correspondence columns of the “Tribune”, on the future of education. It seems a thousand pities, if, indeed, it is not a definite national drawback, that intelligent men like national school teachers cannot discuss a subject that is of vital interest to them and their country in temperate language, without getting lost in a miasma of irrelevant abuse.

Yet it must be frankly and sadly confessed that those who have entered into correspondence on the subject have added little to the discussion. The controversy was begun by a contributor, who had very definite views, with which we did not altogether agree, but if the points at issue had been adhered to, it might have served a very useful purpose.

Teaching journals are clamouring that the general public do not take any interest in education. If to take an interest in education is to bring a hornets’ nest to one’s ears, then surely the invitation is a little ungracious.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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