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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune

Enda Cunningham

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on

1914

Was it ass flesh?

A peculiar case was heard at Gort Petty Sessions when a local butcher named Martin Kelly was fined 5s. and 13s. 6d. costs for having sold meat which was unfit for human consumption and which baffled a host of analysts, including Sir Charles Cameron.

George Heaney, shoemaker, Nestor’s Lane, Gort, swore that on the evening of January 12th, he was in Mrs. Cloran’s house in Church street.

He saw Martin Kelly come in and offer meat for sale. Witness inquired what sort it was, and Kelly told him it was pork. Witness bought a piece, bulked (1lb), for which he paid defendant fourpence. He got it cooked, but felt suspicious about it, and brought it to the police barracks and entered a complaint. It was not a porksteak, though it might be beef.

Mr. O’Beirne, D.I.: I had the meat forwarded for analysis to Dublin, and received this report: “It is not mutton, beef, horseflesh, or pork; its composition will not answer any test.”

“So you see” added that District Inspector, “it has baffled Sir Charles Cameron and a host of other analysts. It is a most extraordinary piece of meat.” (Loud laughter).

Sergt. Callaghan: Several people in the town are complaining of this man.

Mr. O’Beirne, D.I.: It is very general, but lately the practice has got more serious. The meat, if pork, would be 8d. or 10d.

Mr. Coen: It is very dangerous, and it might be poisonous.

Mr. O’Beirne: Sir Charles Cameron is doubtful if it is ass flesh, as he says there is no real test.

 “No sleep made me drunk”

At Galway Petty Sessions, Constable O’Connor had John Francis summoned for being drunk on the public street. Defendant said he was at the fair of Athenry on Saturday, the 7th inst., and was up all night.

“I was not drunk,” he added, “but want of sleep made me more drunk than all the drink I had taken.” (Laughter).

The Chairman asked defendant if he would take the pledge, and Francis replied that he would, and that if he was caught again, the Bench could give him six months (laughter). He was fined 2s. 6d.

1939

Ashford mystery deepens

The mystery of the sale of Ashford estate appears to be getting deeper. A “Connacht Tribune” reporter was informed on rather reliable authority last week that the estate was not actually sold at all yet.

His informant said that the Forestry Department had made a certain offer but the sale was by no means completed. It appears that the Hon. A.E. Guinness is insisting on certain conditions in the interests of his former employees at Ashford.

Mr. Guinness attended a meeting of the trustees in Dublin last week and it was then he is reported to have disclosed his alleged attitude. He is stated to be insisting that the employees of Ashford should be left undisturbed by a change of ownership.

Failing his obtaining such guarantees, it is said that Mr. Guinness is prepared to buy out the interests of Lord Moyne and Lord Iveagh and keep on the estate himself.

Meanwhile an atmosphere of uncertainty prevails in Cong. None of the management in the office there are prepared to talk and the strictest secrecy is being observed as regards movements and happenings within the castle grounds. Intending visitors to Ashford have been refused admission at the gates.

A “Connacht Tribune” reporter learned, however, that events took a surprising turn there during the weekend, when the auctioneers who have been preparing for the auction marked over three hundred of the more valuable articles “withdrawn”.

Guards fast

“A policeman’s lot is not a happy one.” At least this was the unanimous opinion of the station party in Maam garda barracks when a reporter found them waiting for their breakfast late on Tuesday morning.

Their housekeeper lives some distance from the barracks and the heavy rains on Monday night caused flooding, which marooned her in her house.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

 

 

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

Participants in the Eucharistic Procession pass through Eyre Square on June 20, 1965.

1920

Unparalleled turmoil

Even the long and tear-stained history of Ireland can find no parallel for the terrible happenings of the present week. Nearly forty people have come to violent and sudden deaths.

Sunday’s tragedies in the Irish capital and the sequel at Croke Park might well drive men who hope for, and long for, peace to utter despair. But courage is the quality that is required to-day, not despair – moral courage to point the path to peace and just dealing between man and man.

We live in the twentieth century of civilisation – though the surge of horrors that surround us might make it difficult to realise that fact – and God is in heaven. His Commandments still hold, though some of his people may forget them for a time. It is the duty of all men in authority to recall them so that the terrible passions of our time may subside and that a Godly peace may once more be promoted in our midst.

The tragedy of Father Griffin’s death stuck us more nearly than anything that has happened even in these days of horror. He was God’s anointed, the servant of the Prince of Peace. By the tradition and practice that governs all Christian peoples, he should stand as a man apart from the vengeful passions of the multitude.

During the recent riots in Londonderry, the one fact that lit up a sordid picture with a flame of light was that the violent mobs on both sides held their fire whilst the priests crept out from the side of the streets to succour the wounded, to console the dying.

And Fr. Griffin dwelt amongst us for two years. The little children of our streets knew him, and in many respects he was like unto one of these. All life lay before him in the most sacred, if not most responsible calling, that man can enter.

This was the man of whom the ghastliest story since the days of Cromwell has to be told. All who have hearts have been touched, all who have tears have shed them by his bier.

The funeral

Amidst scenes of most profound public sympathy and inspiring devotional expressiveness the remains of the late Rev. Michael Griffin were solemnly laid to rest beneath the shadow of the eastern wing of the Cathedral in Loughrea on Wednesday.

That feeling most intense has been aroused all over the county by the shocking tragedy was painfully in evidence. Nothing that has ever happened in the county in modern times has wounded the public conscience in such a way.

Popular to a degree, the deceased young priest was a man of much promise, full of personal charm and affability. The events of Wednesday will live long in the history of his native diocese. The position of his last resting place is one which must always attract the notice of the visitor.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

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on

A view of Galway City captured from atop Galway Fire Station in 1979, taking in Wolfe Tone Bridge and some of Fish Market Square. The site of McDonogh's Fertilizers is now home to Jury's Hotel, while there have also been significant changes to the buidings on Quay Lane over the years.

1920

Workers for peace

English Labour, which appears to have found itself as impotent in the face of the mechanical Coalition majority at Westminster as the Irish Party found itself against Carsonism in the days of the Curragh revolt, has at last been afforded an opening towards making an effective bid for peace with Ireland.

The Irish Trades’ Congress this week accepted the British workers’ conditions of settlement, and noted that their teams, unlike those of British Ministers, leave no loopholes and are devoid of ambiguity.

Briefly, the British workers suggest that the present campaign of militarism against the Irish people should end; that a constituent Irish assembly should be elected by proportional representation, and that it should devise a constitution subject only to the safeguards of minorities and the naval and military interests of the British Empire.

It is a significant advance that democracies on each side of the Irish Sea find themselves not merely in agreement as to the methods by which peace may be brought about, but ready to translate these methods to action if the opportunity is given.

Older politicians, however, will not fail to register the initial criticism that when British parties are out of power, they are always ready to extend the hand of friendship to Ireland and to back up the gesture with promises that they cannot at the moment fulfil.

Witness to the case of Mr. Asquith who as Prime Minister in 1914 gave the lead in the doctrine that the Irish minority must continue to rule the majority and in 1920 when he is out of power, pours his anathemas upon his successors for carrying his policy to its logical outcome.

Nevertheless, we have not lost faith in a constitutional settlement. It must be obvious to all sane thinkers that sooner or later peace will have to be brought about by negotiation. The sword can never produce a settlement; only those who would recklessly ignore the lessons of history could hold with the doctrine that force can remedy a situation that has become intolerable.

There is a strong will to peace in Ireland to-day, and it is clear that the cumulative effect of the limited publicity that has been gained from present-day conditions in Ireland is having its effect upon English opinion.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

Stephen Corrigan

Published

on

Over 100 locals had roles as extras in the production of The Quiet Man which was filmed at locations in Galway and Mayo, including Ballyglunin and Cong.

1920

Kitchen flogging

One of the most singular cases of flogging yet recorded occurred in Tuam on Saturday night (writes our North Galway representative).

About 11 p.m. a number of men with revolvers knocked at the house of Mr. Pk. Canavan, town clerk, Foster-place, and, finding the door open, rushed into the house.

Mr. Martin Canavan and some young men lodging in the house were sitting in the dining-room, and were about to retire for the night. Mrs. Canavan and her children were in bed.

According to an eye-witness’s account of the affair, there were fourteen or fifteen men in the raiding party. Some were dressed in overcoats and soft hats, and some wore Glengarry caps.

They ordered all in the room to put up their hands, and asked if the house was Cooney’s. Mr. Canavan said Cooney’s house was next door. He and the others were then searched, and a young man named McDonnell, a draper’s assistant was asked if he was a Sinn Féiner.

He said he had nothing to do with Sinn Féin. Then he was asked, “what about your confederates,” and he said he had no confederates. Two private letters from a sister and a brother were taken from him and read, but it does not appear that there was any references in the letters to anything political.

Mr McDonnell was taken out to the kitchen, stripped, and put across a sewing machine, and flogged with leather straps and buckles for about twenty minutes.

Mrs. Canavan came down to inquire what was wrong. She and Mr. Canavan protested against the treatment of Mr. McDonnell, a young man who had no act or part in politics.

She was ordered back upstairs. Her children screamed with fright. Those in the dining-room were asked “on their honour” if they had any gun or revolvers in the house, and on their stating that they had not, they were told to sit down. On leaving, the leader of the party turned back and bade them “good night.”

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app

The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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