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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Time Gone By – A browse through the archives of the Connacht Tribune.

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1913

House purchase protest

The purchase by certain parties in the town of Tuam of the houses of the occupying tenants, who were either negotiating for their purchase or anxious to buy, has evoked a public protest from the Tuam branch of the United Irish League, which was recently re-organised on a sound basis and with a membership embracing the representative people of the town and parish.

It is anticipated, unless satisfactory settlements are carried out, that a severe form of reprobation will have to be taken against the parties.

In view of the approach of the season of “goodwill and cheer”, and when all are expected to cast aside their petty differences and jealousies for the better and happy enjoyment of friendship and peace, we make the suggestion in the hope that it will be adopted; that those parties who are bringing unpleasantness to their very doors should remember their actions, and have restored to them the confidence, respect and goodwill of the people.

At a UIL meeting in Letterfrack, the prevailing feeling was that a determined effort should be made to make 1914 the last year of grazierism in the district.

The Estates Committee sent in a communication they received from the C.D.B. with reference to the Blake estate, and also conveying the information that the maps and documents connected with the Thompson estate had been lodged.

The announcement was received with cheers, and the question of raising the no-rent strike on this estate was left over till next meeting.

The doings of “scabs” and those with whom they came in contact during the fortnight, was under discussion for a considerable time.

1938

Minister for Deuce

At Galway District Court before District Justice Sean MacGiollarnath, John Dowdall, 70, Lower Salthill, Galway, was charged with being in possession of a quantity of poteen.

Supt. Sean Murphy prosecuted. Defendant was not professionally represented.

Garda James Murphy gave evidence of having arrested the defendant. He found him in possession of the bottle of poteen. The defendant was intoxicated.

He asked for his name, defendant replied: “Frank Aiken, Minister for Deuce.”

Asked if he had anything to say, the defendant replied that he was a stranger to the West of Ireland. He met an old pal whom he had not seen since his schooldays and was a victim of circumstances.

In reply to Supt. Murphy, witness said that he had a wife and family in Drogheda. The Justice adjourned the case for three months and made an order that the guards should enquire if he supported his wife and family, if not, a fine would be imposed.

New schools

It is likely that advertisements will be issued within the next fortnight inviting tenders for the construction of two new vocational education schools, one at Gort and the other at Portumna. Plans and specifications, as prepared by Mr. Geo. Lee, B.E., county surveyor, have been approved by the Department of Education, and as soon as the bills of quantities are ready, tenders for the building work will be invited.

At the monthly meeting of the County Vocational Education Committee, the CEO, Mr Sean O Dochartaigh, said there was a little glasshouse erected at Carraroe, and the rural science teacher wished to have a lorry load of suitable soil supplied for it. The soil should be suitable for the growing of tomatoes. It was agreed to supply soil from the nearest point from which suitable soil could be procured.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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The construction of a new wheelchair-friendly footbridge by Galway Corporation over the Friar’s River Canal at Newtownsmith on October 20, 1998. It replaced the old temporary bridge that had become dangerous and could not take wheelchairs.

1922

Posting poor returns

Postal rates and telephone charges in Ireland are at the moment probably as high as they are in any country in the world, higher than they are in most.

The penny post has been restored in Great Britain, following the wage cut, which was introduced without any stoppage in the public service.

And the postal facilities in Ireland at the moment are probably worse than in any civilised state in the world. This is not altogether the fault of those who control the post office.

But, while much of this is due to conditions over which postal officials can have no control, a very considerable percentage of it is due to a badly run post office.

There is something very rotten in a service that loses a million a year, and yet gives the public only very indifferent results; for not merely are the Irish people paying abnormal postal and telegraph rates, but they are paying for the deficit in the form of taxation, so that their letters cost them much more than twopence.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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A little girl celebrates Sarsfields’ success in the County Hurling Final in 1997.

1922

The ‘pay-nobodies’

The righteous wrath of members of Galway County Council very properly manifested itself against the “pay nobodies” at the meeting on Saturday last.

“I am quite satisfied,” declared Dr. Walsh, “that numbers of people who defend the policy of not paying rates are thoroughly dishonest.”

Mr. Kennedy said the policy to-day was to pay nobody and the people who were in debt themselves “wanted everybody else to be in the same position”.

Mr. Tierney invoked the dictum of the Irish Hierarchy in regard to the payment of just and lawful debts. Verily, “there are greater thieves than Cacus” – men who have such noble and patriotic notions that, to their mind, national freedom is synonymous with freedom from just and lawful obligations. It is time the people paid their rates and debts and gave up their outworn cant.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

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Galway in Days Gone By

Galway In Days Gone By

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Oil-covered swans being rescued for cleaning from the water at the Claddagh following an oil spill into the River Corrib in March 2001. A spillage upstream reached the Claddagh Basin and dozens of swans had to be removed to a sanctuary for safe keeping. About 20 swans were so contaminated that they either died or had to be put down.

1922

Temperance club

A long-felt want in Galway has been supplied this week by the opening on Monday night of the temperance club in the Columban Hall.

The club, which will be carried on under the committee of the Pioneer Association, is not confined exclusively to pioneers, but will be open to persons who have a pledge against the use of alcoholic drinks.

There will be an entrance fee of 2s. and a nominal payment for members of 6d. a month will be required to pay expenses. It is intended to provide games, etc., on the premises and in the near future to organise concerts, debates, conversazione, etc.

Rev. Father Stapleton, director of the Pioneer Association, is interesting himself in the club, and those who know the kindly soggarth aroon’s organising capacity have no doubt as to the future success of the club.

Those desirous of joining should call at the hall any night during the week between the hours of 7 and 10.30 p.m.

For more, read this week’s Connacht Tribune.

Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App

Download the Connacht Tribune Digital Edition App to access to Galway’s best-selling newspaper.

Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

Or purchase the Digital Edition for PC, Mac or Laptop from Pagesuite  HERE.

Get the Connacht Tribune Live app
The Connacht Tribune Live app is the home of everything that is happening in Galway City and county. It’s completely FREE and features all the latest news, sport and information on what’s on in your area. Click HERE to download it for iPhone and iPad from Apple’s App Store, or HERE to get the Android Version from Google Play.

 

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